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  1. #41
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I have no opinion one way or another about India in this regard. Don't judge me on it! The point is that I have been given this comment by a person doing a reputable survey for EK. IDK if it is correct or not, nor do I have any way to say more than what I did ("what I am told").

    From my POV we have 2 opinions. One may involve an Islamic POV and the other may not. IDK.

    PE

  2. #42

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    A few years back I heard quite a bit about a book claiming that Asians and Westerners think differently and perceive things differently (The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently...and Why, Richard Nisbett). I didn't read it so can't comment on it, but mention it in case it's of interest to anyone reading this thread.

    There's a bit of related information at this link:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/he...pagewanted=all

    "Culture can affect not just language and custom, but how people experience the world at stunningly basic levels - what they see when they look at a city street, for example, or even how they perceive a simple line in a square".

  3. #43

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    Having worked in very wealthy areas and lived in a very poor area within 3 miles of each other I can say geographical distances are relative (or irrelevant) to finding severely different perspectives from which to view anything. Generationally isolated hegemonic groups are good at tribalizing their views and habits in ways that keep them isolated.

    Certainly as we study each others' tribal identities we will find both commonalities and unusual differences.

    Perhaps geographical distances were once avenues for building wider and stranger variations but that will certainly be slowly reversing as the internet and travel become more ubiquitous.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  4. #44

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    Answering the original post : Absolutely. Dramatically at times. Even within different regions of the same country, different demographic socio-economic groups, ethnicities, proclivities, generational gaps. The first curator who gave me a gig way back cut his own teeth importing shows of Asian abstract expressionists to America. Talk about an interesting blend. No way those particular paintings would have been made in NYC.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by apkujeong View Post
    A few years back I heard quite a bit about a book claiming that Asians and Westerners think differently and perceive things differently (The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently...and Why, Richard Nisbett). I didn't read it so can't comment on it, but mention it in case it's of interest to anyone reading this thread.

    There's a bit of related information at this link:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/04/he...pagewanted=all

    "Culture can affect not just language and custom, but how people experience the world at stunningly basic levels - what they see when they look at a city street, for example, or even how they perceive a simple line in a square".
    Thanks for the link and I like this:-

    To use a camera analogy, "the Americans are more zoom and the East Asians are more panoramic," said Dr. Denise Park of the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas in Dallas. "The Easterner probably sees more, and the Westerner probably sees less, but in more detail."

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #46

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    ppppppppffffffffffffffffffffffffffttttttttttttt !! I have a pal who goes backpacking with me to the same locations. We live nearby. He takes nothing but wide-angle lenses, I don't take any - prefer all longer focal lengths. We look at the same subject and compose it totally differently.
    Just personal inclination, and has zero to do with whether one is from the East or West. I'm sure you'd find just as many personal inclinations
    in the Orient. After all, don't those guys make pretty much the same range or choices of focal length lenses as the Germans do?

  7. #47

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    I think similar to how fashion varies from continent to continent, visual style does as well.

    It is my experience that the biggest difference lies in Eastern vs. Western photography moreso than North American vs. South American vs. Europe vs. Etc.

    Photographs with Western influence appear to be more strong and poignant from a stylistic point of view. They have more of an initial "grab" and "flash" to them which I personally attribute to a more open and relaxed culture.

    When I look at the work of Eastern photographers, I feel as though there is a more subtle style both in terms of subject and aesthetics. The photographs generally have a lot of room for interpretation and have a sense of mystery to them.

  8. #48
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    No. Not with the slow but insipid Disneyfying of international media. On the other hand, there are some really cool Indy films from all over the world and growing interest of global music. The world is shrinking because of technology.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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