Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,771   Posts: 1,484,328   Online: 1149
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 40 of 40
  1. #31
    Flotsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    S.E. New York State
    Posts
    3,221
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    Having crossed this bridge myself a couple years ago, my recommendation is to go directly to large format.
    That'll solve your problem. You'll never have to worry about spontaneous, from-the-hip, photography in low light circumstances without a heavy tripod and 20 minute setup again.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #32
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,895
    Images
    63
    Now Neal, there is a thing called the Speed Graphic ---
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  3. #33
    Nicole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,545
    Images
    8
    I shoot 35mm and MF - subjects are mostly people. I don't like to use the word portrait as it gives the impression of a set, studio shoot where the subject is 'pinned' in place. My people are moving targets at the best of times in uncontrollable outdoorsy conditions.

    So when I'm shooting with 35mm, I use good fast lenses with clean glass and TriX and find that if my focus is spot on and my exposures are correct I can get good prints right up to 16x20. Also I use manual focus as much as I can, depending on the subject.

    Kind regards,
    Nicole

  4. #34
    garryl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    542
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    Now Neal, there is a thing called the Speed Graphic ---
    "The old WeeGee trick". :o Would you believe Bush Pressman?
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    462
    Images
    6
    "I shot 35mm exclusively (for economic reasons alone) with a Canon "new" F-1."

    If you check around you will find that a used 4x5 outfit will cost less, or even a new Calumet Cadet 4x5 outfit with lens & holders still costs less than what your 35mm outfit did.

    You can even get an 8x10 for less if you shop used & carefully.

    Then, you will shoot fewer images of higher quality and the end result is that you still spend less & have a much higher ratio of good photos when you are done.

  6. #36
    garryl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    542
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by WarEaglemtn
    If you check around you will find that a used 4x5 outfit will cost less, or even a new Calumet Cadet 4x5 outfit with lens & holders still costs less than what your 35mm outfit did.
    Yes, you might even be able to get a "BJ" for a reasonale price.... Burke & James that is! :o
    "Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect."

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    98
    I must take exception here. No 4x5, not even a Speed Graphic, is a direct substitute for a 35mm camera. If you are using a 35mm for landscapes, largely tripod photography where you take your time, then yes, you could move up and gain a lot of attractive qualities. But the shooting is very different. If you are doing available light people photography, to pick one example, it's very hard to do that in 4x5.

    Which is not to say that moving to a larger format is not good--I'm a 6x6 guy myself and like shooting 4x5 occasionally. But this thread is about failings in printing 8x10s from 35mm, which should be very doable.

  8. #38
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    The problem isn't in the format, I used to make 11x14" Cibachromes from Ektachrome transpariences from my old Nikon F3 without any problems. I haven't done any 35mm lately though.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    284
    unfortunetly I didnt write his name down but there was a photographer (I believe on staff?) whos photograph was in the print study room at the art institute of chicago, it was a 24"x36" print 'lith printed' in 4 colors (if I recall correctly) it was grainy shot somewhere in wisconsin at night, beautiful!

    The man who shot the photo came out after being called when someone asked a question about the size of photos, as his was one of the largest prints on display in the room he was a pretty good one to ask. Pretty much came to the conclusion 'because we can'. I agree, the image looked great even at that size. I asked him specifically if it was shot on 35mm and he said yes.

    That being said, I used to print 8x10 the majority of the time with my 35mm but have recently moved to 5x7 because its cheaper for more prints, and it keeps a bit more of the sharpness I like, while fitting the papers format much more pleasingly.
    Last edited by Christopher Colley; 03-21-2005 at 09:56 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: elaborate!
    "Where is beauty? Where I must will with my whole Will; where I will love and perish, that an image may not remain merely an image."

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Binghamton, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    264
    I believe you answered your own question, which is that you'll have to stay fast enough to keep camera shake to a minimum, and not try to slip under the ASA (i.e. don't think that you can compensate for underexposing by a half stop or so). Check your enlarging lens for fungus, dust, or separation, and then maybe try something like Tri-X/HP-5/Delta-400 in Microphen, for a little extra effective speed.

    I have 8x12s from 400 negs or slides, and the deciding factor on whether it looks good at that size is camera shake, followed by sufficient depth of field for the subject; except when I've used Delta-3200, it's never the film. You may just want to look into improving your shooting stance by using doorframes or walls for support, pulling in your elbows, or shifting how you balance your camara.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin