Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,316   Posts: 1,536,725   Online: 1016
      
Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 119
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    White Lake, Ontario.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    342
    Art Critique: One definition?

    The guy who sits in the passenger's seat, knows & shows the way but can't drive the car.

    But seriously, do you feel unable to put into art-speak your feelings about a piece of art? Do you, too, like some of those ACs, want the gift of Critical Response to the Art Product (or CRAP)?

    Simply use this link below and you too can instantly add matching verbiage to any photograph. All you have to do is enter a 5 digit value you place on a piece of art work. For instance, I felt a 12345 value best reflected my feelings about a certain EW photograph. With the help of this wonderful tool, my feelings magically appeared into words: "With regard to the issue of content, the disjunctive perturbation of the spatial relationships brings within the realm of discourse the distinctive formal juxtapositions." My thoughts exactly :rolleyes:

    So here you are, budding Art Critiques, your troubles are over. Go forth and inflict us all with your cryptic verbal diarrhea easily and effrortlessly. Better yet, have that car drive into the ditch why don't you.

    http://www.pixmaven.com/phrase_generator.html
    Last edited by Daniel Grenier; 03-16-2005 at 07:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Andy K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sunny Southend, England.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,422
    Images
    81
    I very rarely comment in the critique gallery. Mainly because I see the majority of work there demonstrating photographic skills far in excess of my own, I therefore do not feel qualified to give a serious critique.
    Another reason is many critiques seem to go out of their way to focus on the negative aspects of a photograph. Personally I never see anything wrong with any photo I view, I may see things I would have done differently, but that does not mean the photographer has made a mistake.
    Also I have lost count of how many times I have seen 'lacking contrast/saturation/sharpness etc' written, I honestly don't see how anyone can comment on anything other than composition, given that every monitor is different?

    If I like a photograph I'll say so, if I don't I see no reason to attempt to impose my personal tastes on others in a 'critique'.

    Remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and every beholder has a different eye.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  3. #13
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022
    Me too! Ed, can I come to your studio during a shoot too???? :-)-chuck
    You are welcome, anytime. Just don't pop in unannounced.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #14
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Grenier
    Art Critique: One definition?
    So here you are, budding Art Critiques, your troubles are over. Go forth and inflict us all with your cryptic verbal diarrhea easily and effrortlessly. Better yet, have that car drive into the ditch why don't you.
    Thanks, Daniel. That added necessary "lightness" to a "dark" discussion!

    I LOVE that automated critique site!!! The great mystery is how it was made to be SO relevant without any specific input from the works themselves ... :rolleyes:
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #15
    blackmelas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Corinth, Greece
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    353
    Images
    24
    First I should say that I spent 8 years in architecture/art school where a critique meant that more or less knowledgable people (professors) stripped you naked for your colleagues to see. In spite of these negative memories (that I sense many people here might have as well) I will probably continue to _only_ post my photos to the critique gallery. I'll have to look to see how and what people said about Ed's work but Apugers have been very sensitive to me and my work. I feel as if the critique gallery is one place where I can be honest and sensitive and get an honest opinion in return. I comment on anything that I feel about the photo, composition included, not because I want to trash a work but by placing it there the photographer is asking for an honest opinion. I put my work there because I'm too invested in it and I want to know how it is perceived by other eyes. If I think a critic is wrong about my work, I suck it up and thank that person with that same words that I use for another critic that praised me. I'm with Chuck, the citicism that I receive from people here is helping me grow as a photographer.
    James

  6. #16
    colrehogan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Shooter
    Large Format Pan
    Posts
    2,016
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    16
    What a riot that link is! Here's one of the two phrases that I got from it.

    Umm... the disjunctive perturbation of the sexy fish notates the substructure of critical thinking.

    ROFLMAO!
    Diane

    Halak 41

  7. #17
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by djklmnop
    Critiquing an image is quite easy. What's difficult is actually receiving a critique, rather. All of our work is part of us as a photographer and we tend to take any negative criticism as a personal attack. The hardest part is to accept the critique and apply them to the next photograph we take. My heart sinks when I see people come back with the same shoddy image over and over again even after they've been told what to avoid or how to correct certain problems.
    How does one judge "shoddiness?"

    A short anecdote:

    I am the "curator" of a modest public Gallery, owned by the Town, and accepting a wide variety of work from artists of every station and ilk.
    One of the exhibitors was a Roman Catholic Nun.

    We got to schmoozing (with all the practice I've had, I should be far better at that than I am) and she asked to see my portfolio. I think, from my submissions here, you may have some idea of its contents. I said, "Uh... I do a lot of figure study work." She replied, "That's OK ... I appreciate ALL art."

    With the assurance that I would not get my knuckles rapped with a ruler, I hesitatingly gave her the portfolio. She proceeded to - really LOOK at each image, and then started her critique: "Nice image, but, the background is too cluttered -the hands should have been placed - so; Cropping like this would have been the way to go...."

    After fifteen minutes of this, with me standing there with my hat in my hands... She looked up...

    "You're not going to do any of this, are you?

    Me: "No."

    RCN: "Good!!! I wouldn't either. This is your work, and trying to mix it with the vision of anyone else can only degrade it. Keep it your own. Nothing is more important."

    There has been a lot written here about how it is right and proper to administer strong, bitter tasting "medicine" to each other in the form of sharp criticism, justifying the total lack of social grace, or mercy, with, "It's for your/ their own good."

    Nah! I submit that the most effective way to ALLOW a photographer / artist to realize their potential is to loosen the soil around their roots, and to apply the nurture of positive re-inforcement.

    DO NOT hammer them into the boxes of our choosing... that can only stunt their true growth.

    One last thought ... we here in Ipswich have been studying, and trying to find ways of dealing with "Bullying" in the School System. This is by no means, an isolated problem, and it has been shown to have a severe negative effect on the quality of education.
    I can't help but wonder - constructive criticism is good; the problem is in determining which is "constructive" and which really fits best into the "bullying" slot.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #18
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Coast, BC, Canada
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    4,195
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    I am the "curator" of a modest public Gallery, owned by the Town, and accepting a wide variety of work from artists of every station and ilk.
    One of the exhibitors was a Roman Catholic Nun.

    We got to schmoozing (with all the practice I've had, I should be far better at that than I am) and she asked to see my portfolio. I think, from my submissions here, you may have some idea of its contents. I said, "Uh... I do a lot of figure study work." She replied, "That's OK ... I appreciate ALL art."

    With the assurance that I would not get my knuckles rapped with a ruler, I hesitatingly gave her the portfolio. She proceeded to - really LOOK at each image, and then started her critique: "Nice image, but, the background is too cluttered -the hands should have been placed - so; Cropping like this would have been the way to go...."

    After fifteen minutes of this, with me standing there with my hat in my hands... She looked up...

    "You're not going to do any of this, are you?

    Me: "No."

    RCN: "Good!!! I wouldn't either. This is your work, and trying to mix it with the vision of anyone else can only degrade it. Keep it your own. Nothing is more important
    Great story Ed!!

    My story is about how people in positions of power can be blind; how people with more experience and knowledge than you can get it totally wrong.

    I was accepted to a fine arts college with nothing but 4x5 B&W contact prints in my portfolio...there were no sketches, drawings, or paintings in it. They let me in on the strength of my compositions, but felt that I could reveal more tones in my prints with further work in the darkroom.

    I took the same contact prints to the head of the photography program at the same college...he said my printing was good, but that my compositions were weak! Moral: never blindly accept the advice of others, no matter who they may be.

    In the last sentence of that Nun's critique, she gave the best advice for artists of all time!!

    Murray

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    I am in the same boat as AndyK. I look at many of the photos posted as "this is how it should be done", sort of a self-teaching thing. I am also aware that a jpeg is not the same as the original print or slide.

  10. #20
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    I very rarely comment in the critique gallery. Mainly because I see the majority of work there demonstrating photographic skills far in excess of my own, I therefore do not feel qualified to give a serious critique.
    Unfortunately, a lot of people have this idea that critiquing an image, means talking about the negative (bad) aspect of the image. Try concentrating on what you like about the image; anyone can do that, regardless of your skill level. It does bring value to the photographer, if they have any sense, because it allows the photographer to see if what they were trying to convey in the image actually got across. When we get hung up on details that may not be perfect, that message doesn't always come across. It is a good way of refining your technique.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin