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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth
    I knew when I posted this that the thoughts I have had would be familiar to many, even if they did not agree. I had felt this way for some time, but it was not consciously acknowledged....my mind was too swamped with photography to give it too much attention. The break of 6 weeks brought it to the front of my mind and forced me to actually think about it before picking up a camaera again. I think what it has told me is to try less hard, enjoy it more and care less. From a creative point of view, I think my ambition to 'suceed' became a hindrance. The sense of liberty gained from having a new job, more time to take images and no need to make a penny from photography cannot be understated
    You said it, Tom. There's nothing like thinking about the fact that someone else will eventually be looking at (and, gulp, talking about buying) your work to make you avoidant about doing said work. I like to quote David Vestal a lot, and I think you would enjoy his article 'The Case For Obscurity' in which he says that being famous would be a horrible nuisance and how could you create quality work under such circumstances.

  2. #42
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    I don't remember the exact details so excuse historical inaccuracies:

    In the late 1890's physics was coming to the end of a boom period. The great names of classical physics had explained virtually all of the natural phenomena around us.

    One of the physics societies actually publised a turn of the century article, explicitly saying that their work was almost complete. In that article they identified 10 "minor" areas which needed to be tidied up before they could declare physics "done".

    Over the next 15 years, tying off those loose ends created relativity and (more importantly!) quantum mechanics - entirly new fields which redefined physics completly. Virtually everything which had gone before was thrown out, or re-cast in a new light.

    When it looked like there was nothing new to be done, they just needed to take a few more steps, because around the corner there was a whole new world to be discovered.

    Ian

  3. #43

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    A colleague of mine has been doing what you would call "straight documentary" photography for decades. It is meticulous work. While there may be nothing new under the sun, there are a lot of old things disappearing all the time. Thus the documentary.

    Regarding the art of photography, well it speaks to itself in terms of reaction, affirmation, comment and that is always, and necesssarily, a moving target to keep the artists and critics busy.

    Vestal's comment follows Marcel Duchamp's in which he said that he quit art because he found he was becoming a professional painter, and that would be the death of an artist.

  4. #44
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    Just "Quietly", gang ...

    "Ornello" has written me via private e-mail. I questioned him as to what he knew about the attitudes of "Artists", and how many he had met.

    He replied, "Back in the '70's, I dated a couple of girls from the local Arts College (- or was it "School"?), and socialized with their friends." End. Nothing more.
    From a massive "base" of knowledge like that ....

    I won't continue. For two reasons; one, that this whole deal with Ornello is a massive exercise in futility; and two, that I do not want to incur the wrath of Sean, or any additional from everyone else here... So, this ends my discussion about/ with Ornello.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #45
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    Yeah... I know what I said, but...

    "Ornello" has just informed me, via PM, that his true identitiy is ... has anyone guessed? ... Michael Scarpitti.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #46

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    The infamous mr M.Scarpitti. Who would have guessed? Its quite fun...rather like watching a school pantomime trying to guess who is inside which costume.

  7. #47

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    Tom Stanworth: "I think what it has told me is to try less hard, enjoy it more and care less. From a creative point of view, I think my ambition to 'suceed' became a hindrance."

    Yes, that's the right direction. Try to think of it this way: Making photographs should be an enjoyable experience and one that leads to personal growth. Looked at that way, it does not matter if the photograph comes out well or not. It is the depth of the experience that counts. If the photograph turns out well, that is a bonus. If you do enough work and have a bit of talent for it, enough will come out well. That is not something you have to worry about. Success? Success is simply being able to do what you want to do. If you achieve that, you are successful.

  8. #48
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    So maybe it is all about losing ones self in the act and what comes will come.

    During a slide show in a sculpture class we looked at a sculptor's work. The work was very energized, exuberant, confident, unique, highly stylized and very cool. The teacher stoped the slide show to talk about 'personal aesthetic' and that the work was totaly unique for the time (1940's and 50's when the artist was young which we didn't know until this talk) and all about this person. He then discussed how we build our aesthetic as we grow and over time. That this aesthetic thing was as much or more about our experiences, hopes, successes, failures and compromises as it is about our ideas, dedication or lack thereof to art.

    He then showed us slides by the same artist toward the end of his life, 40-50 years later when he was well into his 60's and 70's. The work was of simple classic forms, elegant, minimal and arrestingly beautiful.

    This is not to say that what came later was better then what came first, but that maybe, it was always all about who he was and not about the art.

    I think breaking new ground is what is talked about after the fact. I also think that art is not about the medium, but the message and the message can be all about the messenger.

    *

  9. #49

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    I had a conversation with a professional auctioneer today, He made an interesting comment about artists: "Artists way overvalue their work" My first reaction was to dis-agree, but when I started thinking about it, it made some sense. Kind of relates to this conversation in that, If an artist gets so locked in on what it is they have to say or how much $'s they need to make or even what technical perfection they are able to acheive the motivation blinds the freedom for instinctive creation. These things money and viewpoint take up space that is better used for focused awareness on evolving ideas. Creation, destruction then re-creation. I guess it is really easy to say this but we really to not have the freedoms to focus 24/7 on intuition any more. Patrons are not hanging out there to give artists the freedom to not live within the confines of normalsy and to "let go". let it all go! make mistakes and evolve. There is just to much responsibility and pressure for conformity. I'm sure if more people are allowed to chanel their energies then, truly concentrate to a point of absolute mental freedom we would see more artists raising to the level creative freedom. Maybe even inventing new viewpoints. Course one could make the argument that: " If you really want it then you'll make it happen no matter what" But to what expense? It should be: " If you really want IT then let IT happen" I'm so confused!!!
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

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