Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,746   Posts: 1,515,664   Online: 789
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Is it or not?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,231
    Images
    9

    Is it or not?

    I have heard this a lot lately:

    "It is the final image that matters, not the process that created it."

    I have a hard time accepting this but I do not know why? Maybe it is because I am too close to the process. Maybe it is a part of my nature. I don't know.

    I know there are some who feel the same as I do and others who do not. I am curious as to your reasons why.

    Maybe I should post this on a predominently digital site and see what they have to say too
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #2
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    I have heard this time and time again. Last Fall, I was lucky enough to show a Gallery owner from New Zealand around the many galleries of the SF area. We went up to Napa Valley one of my favorite places. At the Mumm Winery they have a very good photography gallery. Half of the space is taken up by a rotating display of around 40 or more of Ansel Adams photographs. When we were there they had argueably one of the better digital printers/photographers side by side with Ansels pictures. If any had seen the comparison we were fortunate to see, the final image would have been obvious. the digital was a poor distant representation of a photograph compared to what Ansel had accomplished. Yet until you saw them side by side, you would have thought the digital were great and the man had done an excellent job. You might have even started to consider digital, they were that good. Poor man suffered when the side by side prints hung there as testament to the fact that digital is not as good as analog photography. The digital came off as poster art.
    Non Digital Diva

  3. #3
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by mark

    "It is the final image that matters, not the process that created it."
    It's not clear to me exactly what you are asking. Since a lot of people here are hobbiests, then the image matters, but the "process" of getting out and taking pictures as well as the darkroom process, is what they enjoy probably more.

    As a pro, the "process" of how we got the final print is secondary to delivering a great print. Meaning using the best possible methods (including archival). Obviously the "process" of doing the work must be enjoyable or we would do something else. People here have said if you want to ruin a great hobby, do it for a living. For me that is not the case.


    If you are talking digital vs analog, as a hobbiest, do what you enjoy. If it's for sale you probably owe your clients the best possible process ( including archival) that is available. IF you are a graphic arts type of photographer then I would guess that you need to be digital.

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  4. #4
    shyguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    North East USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    128
    Relative to the B&W traditional (wet) process; I would say that the end result is all that maters. I think many of the "masters" would agree. Most negatives require some manipulation to get the print you want. A.A. did lots of this. If you take the stand that you can’t manipulate the negative, you will not produce the finest work you and the negative are capable of. It may be honest, but it is also crap.

    Just my 2 cents.

    S.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,231
    Images
    9
    It is the statement that bugs me.

    Definately not an analogue versus traditional thing, or a manipulate don't manipulate thing.

    As a hobbiest I go through the process that will give me the image I envisioned from the start. the two, image and process, are inseperable for me, the creator. So it is not just about the final image. It is the journey that makes the final image that much sweeter. As a buyer of images I find that I am first drawn to the subject of the image. From there my connection is deepened by knowing the process. Probably just my nature but I feel more involved with the image because I feel I better understand the journey the creator undertook. Things might be different if I did not take photographs.

    I hope that makes sense. Maybe the reason the statement bugs me is because of my love of the journey.

    I thought about posting it on a digital oriented site just to see if the answers would be different or similar.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Århus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16
    I am interested in the content, not the form.

    My favorite, non-photography artist is 100% digital image maker Ray Caesar.

  7. #7
    Helen B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen, New York, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,557
    Images
    27
    I use whichever process I am capable of that will give me the end result I require for each particular piece of work, so to me the end result is the only important thing. I do it as well as I can, but hope that the content is always more interesting (not quite the right word, but the best I can think of right now) to the viewer than the craft.

    Oddly enough people get sidetracked by the technical quality of my inkjet work more than they do about my traditional work - probably because they see a lot of bad inkjet prints while most traditional work is so good.

    Oh, I've just thought of the one thing that is more important than the image (let's be honest, I just take snapshots) and that is the glazing. I'm obsessive about the glazing. Only anti-reflective. Not plain and most definitely not 'non-glare'. If you ever see my work you'd better say how much you like the glazing...

    Best,
    Helen

  8. #8
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    We went up to Napa Valley one of my favorite places. At the Mumm Winery they have a very good photography gallery.
    Mumm Winery, mmmmmmm...... Great place.

    I just had one of my images printed for a poster on an Epson 9000 (high end ink jet). When I compare the poster with the same image made on Fuji Crystal Archive it is obvious that the ink jet falls way short; the depth just isn't there.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    I work only in analog form. I only wish to work in analog form.. that being said one factor, in my mind, above and beyond the appearance of the end product is "how long will it last"?

  10. #10
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,932
    As Mr Blansky very aptly pointed out above, it all depends. I'm not even good enough to call my self a hobbiest (despite having been at it for more than twenty years now) so for me, it is almost all about the process. Going out in the field with the 4x5 and spending an hour to set up a shot...waiting for the clouds to move or the wind to settle down a little...that's therapeutic for me. Most times the image is mediocre at best but, I'm thrilled anyway.


    I remember former president Nixon saying something about "The end justifies the means"...seems like it was said in reference to his secret bombing of Cambodia or something equally insidious. This generation has forgotten all about that. We're right back at it. No, I don't think the end justifies the means. Never did, never will.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin