Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,775   Posts: 1,484,484   Online: 880
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    471
    Depends on the situation, of course, as to what gear I use but I don't think I enjoy the act of photography more, that when I am using my C330..... No meter. No AF. Just a pocket full of 120, a light meter in my breast pocket and the behemoth around my neck.

  2. #12
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,921
    The camera is just a tool. How one uses the tool to express ideas, to communicate is what makes one a photographer. It doesn't matter one bit whether one uses an automated tool or, a simple one. It is the communication that matters. Use the right tool for the job and develop you communication skills.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Sarajevo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,801
    I am completely misunderstood, but never mind...

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Go right ahead and find yourself some vintage gear and get after it. Then, when you see how truly wonderful advances in equipment are you will come back to the newer stuff. Trust me on this. I started when the only thing there was was manual everything. The only thing advances in technology do is remove the excuses of mechanical failure.[...]
    Luck must be against me, because my 1968 Nikon F cameras still work, as do the very old Linhof, and Hasselblads, while every single, spendy automatic camera I purchased for my wife broke within a year.

    A minor thought - when one surrenders to auto-everything, he's chosen to let the camera choose certain elements of the photographic language. To a writer that is like letting a word processor correct grammar; not all literature, nor every good photo is technically 'correct'.

  5. #15
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    Go right ahead and find yourself some vintage gear and get after it. Then, when you see how truly wonderful advances in equipment are you will come back to the newer stuff. Trust me on this.
    I've used modern cameras, old cameras, vintage cameras and antique cameras.

    Guess what: I prefer the older ones! The extra time and thought required to take a picture with an all-manual large format camera means that I have just about 100% "keepers". So even if I take far fewer exposures, the number of pictures has gone right up!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Sarajevo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,801
    To try to clear even more this issue. What I originaly ment is if anybody start to feel need to leave automatization and to turn to basics what could be force(emotional, artistic, philosophycal, any other) which make that need. And if some of you had that need what was background of it and how do you explain it. And for other what do you think what that could be...

    I know that "use any equipment you want" is correct, but I didn't meant to ask "should I use this or that". And I didn't hope to get answer "I use this or that". That is not the issue here.

  7. #17
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by haris
    I know that "use any equipment you want" is correct, but I didn't meant to ask "should I use this or that". And I didn't hope to get answer "I use this or that". That is not the issue here.
    I see...

    I like big old heavy slow cameras because...

    I don't know really, but I get better results with them. Maybe there are "fewer layers" beween my self and the film?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #18
    SuzanneR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,715
    Images
    135
    I think I'm with Ole, here. I was using AF cameras, with all the bells and whistles for years. When I descided to add medium format, I went with the rangefinder, and just realized how much easier it seemed to be between me... and the film!

    I can never quite manage to get my head around all the functions of my Nikon, and as a result, I probably don't take advantage of everything it has to offer. Oh well... it is still a good tool for certain situations.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Århus, Denmark
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,102
    Images
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by haris
    I am completely misunderstood, but never mind...
    Then I try to respond to your first (and thread-starting) post.

    I have had, and still have, similar thoughts of going back-to-basics and drop all the modern stuff (my camera has the feature of focusing on what I look at by tracking my pupil in the viewfinder with some sort of beam....I never use it, though). But I am too happy with the features (e.g. when shooting kids AF comes handy). The essense for me is to use the features to enhance the quality of the photos by incorporating them into your work flow. The main thing is to see and compose the shot. If you are shooting moving things AE and AF can help you a lot and makes you able to dedicate your energy to composition and finding the great thing to point the camera at. But I agree that I learn a lot by going all manual. I started out with Pentax Spotmatic and learned a lot from the beginning and after that I got more and more features in the cameras I bought next.
    In studio I am almost manual, but in the streets I am using aperture priority and AF a lot.

    So the conclusion for me is that going basic is good experience, but I gain too much from the AF and AE to give it up completely.

    I hope I got closer to what yopu asked.

  10. #20
    Ian Leake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,355
    Images
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by haris
    To try to clear even more this issue. What I originaly ment is if anybody start to feel need to leave automatization and to turn to basics what could be force(emotional, artistic, philosophycal, any other) which make that need. And if some of you had that need what was background of it and how do you explain it. And for other what do you think what that could be...
    I felt this need 2-3 years ago. I felt that I was letting my camera make decisions for me that I thought I should be making. So I switched off the automation and immediately my photography improved. I also discovered that I was enjoying photography more too.

    Since I went manual I have occasionally used partially or fully automated systems (including various digitals). Each time I have felt that they were allowing me to be lazy. I think speed in one area of the process led me to hurry in other areas, probably because I concentrate less. And when I get lazy my photos suffer, leaving me feeling frustrated and disappointed.

    Of course this says more about me than it does about automation. I'm not a luddite - I have a successful career in IT that relies on my technology skills. There's just something about the slow pace of manual photography that I really enjoy.

    I think everyone should at least try non-automated photography. Of course it may not work for you and may not suit the work you do. That's fine - just keep automating. But you may also discover a new creative path.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin