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  1. #1
    scootermm's Avatar
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    viewing photography....

    I had an interesting thought while out shooting and reading today. I was sitting on a bench. had found an image to take but needed to wait for the earth to spin to the right point.
    I was writting in my sketch book and found myself writting about an interesting concept. The whole idea of perceiving and viewing your own artwork. We as creators of a photograph, painting, sculpture, or whatever your chosen pursuit is, we as the creators will never be able to perceive or view our own artwork from that of an unblinded eye. I mean we will always have our hopes or dreams for that piece of art in our mind when viewing this finished piece. I think even so after time away from the creation... it still there. Its an interesting concept.
    I know I love viewing others artwork, paintings, photographs all of it. because of how new and intriguing it is. Fresh. sort of an interesting concept. sometimes I wish it were possible to remove me from myself and view what I create from this tertiary perspective. I think it would be interesting to say the least. perhaps it is possible and someone out there will speak of a way to accomplish this.... I guess that was sort of partly why I thought to post this... to get others thoughts on it.

    the whole concept of removing yourself from your work when viewing it is something I find a strange juxtaposition. on one side I long to be able to do this.... on the other side I shutter at the thought of it... it is me... I want it to always remain me it is a creation of mine that represents my hopes and aspirations for a artistic creation, so understandably when viewing it I want to keep all that in the conscious.

    perhaps random babble... but nonetheless this is the Ethics and Philosophy section

  2. #2
    blansky's Avatar
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    Try viewing it in a mirror.

    It is an interesting perspective and somehow it often feels new.

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #3

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    the whole concept of removing yourself from your work when viewing it is something I find a strange juxtaposition.
    I dont think it is, I cant speak for others but I certainly wish I also had this ability. Just think how much more easy it would be to edit your prints, to judge what to send to a gallery or magazine, to be able to say with certainty "well this print sucks, I might as well throw away the negative."

    As you become better, judging your prints becomes harder. You think it is a juxtaposition, let me tell you, get back to me when you have 30 7x17 prints you consider good and are trying to decided which ones to show.....

    Of course the other side of the road is one where you become so critical of your work that you become paralyzed, making a decision becomes agony.

    In the end after selling close to 80 prints on e bay in 6 months I have learned 2 things. One, you will have a few winners (you will know them when you get them.) Two, you will have your favorites that nobody likes... but given the choice between being able to detach myself when viewing my prints or keeping the passion and always striving for making an even better photograph, I choose the latter.

  4. #4
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    As you become better, judging your prints becomes harder. You think it is a juxtaposition, let me tell you, get back to me when you have 30 7x17 prints you consider good and are trying to decided which ones to show.....
    hmmm Im not sure what this part is meant to convey?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I choose the later
    as do I.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by scootermm
    hmmm Im not sure what this part is meant to convey?
    I meant to say that if you wish you had this ability now, wait until you have more work and having to make a desicion that might mean getting a show or not....then it becomes really tough.

  6. #6
    scootermm's Avatar
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    oh man. I gotcha. couldnt agree more jorge.

  7. #7
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    Hey Matt,

    about a year or so ago I came across a print that I didn't know existed, I thought it had been destroyed. For a split second I had the ability to see it as something other than a creation of my hands. At first I didn't recognize it and thought it was someone elses, so for that split second I almost looked at it with impartial eyes and... I'm not sure that what you're wishing for would do any good!

    If what we hone as artists is not the muscles in the arm that flick the paintbrush just so or the ability to develope our negs perfectly but rather the eyes to see what we want to create, what good is it to see with someone elses eyes? I think it's that very ability to see for yourself that ultimately is what makes your art art. And...there just ain't no shortcuts.
    "If I only had a brain"-Some badly dressed guy made of straw in some movie I think I saw

  8. #8

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    This idea of seperating yourself from your work is confusing to me. In a post here couple of years ago someone even suggested "stop shooting film" and then some syco mumbo jumbo justification to go along with it. While I agree that sometimes accidently seeing an image you shot sometime ago sheds a fresh light I think it is better to get absolutely immersed. Buried in your vision or ideas and let them dictate whatever corrections or adjustments. A stagnet pond is full of nutrients yet eventually dissolves itself and dissapears. So if we mix these nutrients with current ideas and tools eventually there is growth. Growth of a new or an abberation on a current theme. Even if this growth yeilds nothing immediately the platform for growth is broader.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  9. #9
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo
    Hey Matt,

    about a year or so ago I came across a print that I didn't know existed, I thought it had been destroyed. For a split second I had the ability to see it as something other than a creation of my hands. At first I didn't recognize it and thought it was someone elses, so for that split second I almost looked at it with impartial eyes and... I'm not sure that what you're wishing for would do any good!
    interesting point mateo and a distinct possibility that it would do no discernable good at all. but nonetheless, I still would find it interesting and a strange concept to be able to do.

    If what we hone as artists is not the muscles in the arm that flick the paintbrush just so or the ability to develope our negs perfectly but rather the eyes to see what we want to create, what good is it to see with someone elses eyes? I think it's that very ability to see for yourself that ultimately is what makes your art art. And...there just ain't no shortcuts.
    hear hear. I couldnt agree more. The eyes we possess as artists and individuals, as photographers, as painters, as sculptors, as writers, these eyes are what makes up individuals and what allows us to express an individual voice and expression. But I do admit to an admiration of those that are on the other side, as the viewer. They are able to view our art from that completely new and naive perspective and I admire that. Much the same way that I admire and respect the opinion of fellow photographers or painters when they tell me their thoughts on my artistic pursuits. Its invaluable and immeasurably appreciated.

    I cant agree more with this statement as well mateo
    "I think it's that very ability to see for yourself that ultimately is what makes your art art. And...there just ain't no shortcuts."

  10. #10

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    Scootermm

    I have been struggling for the last 2 years, trying to do the opposite. I want to be able to see better through my eyes. I shoot to please me, to create and expose a little bit of me and the way I see the world.
    I dont want to seperate myself from my work I want to get deeper into it. I want to understand what it was that attracted me to the scene, view, flower etc. Something that eludes me at present.
    I look for other peoples opinions on what impact my images have on them but I will always know what it means to me. Without this it is not my image.

    Phill

    PS I think you do just fine looking through your eyes.
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

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