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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The commitment to Analog, and APUG

    In view of Brooks Jensenís recent question to this Forum itís perhaps time to rethink the way we approach the Digital / Analog dilemma.

    We canít fight the tides of change but we can educate and we must.

    The major problem is our materials are no longer on the shelves in many ďHigh StreetĒ photo stores which leads the masses to think theyíve gone. In the town I live in B&W paper and chemicals are in the store room, and have been for 4 or 5 years.

    What we must do is show teenagers and young people what alternatives are available to digital, and each and every one of us should make a positive effort.to encourage and nurture new practitioners

    I am doing just that and my nephew and one niece are now working in B&W, my niece in LF & wanting to use my 10x8  Now itís important to say they approached me there was no coercion.

    If we want conventional materials to survive we must ensure a constant new intake of young photographerís wanting to try using analog imaging.

    We need to make a positive effort to redress the balance

    Ian

  2. #2
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Contact Bostick and Sullivan and ask about their new foundation to help educate the public and new generations about photography and historic processes.
    Non Digital Diva

  3. #3

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    It's not just the average consumer. I keep on hearing from colleagues in aerial archaeology variations on the theme of "Well, I've had to go digital now they've discontinued 220 Tri-X". I have no idea how that myth got going.

    David.

  4. #4
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft
    "Well, I've had to go digital now they've discontinued 220 Tri-X". I have no idea how that myth got going.
    David.
    Perhaps it was the way they phrased their application for new digital equipment. I doubt they mentioned other ways of continuing using film. . . . .

    Ian

  5. #5
    MattCarey's Avatar
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    It strikes me that I see a fair amount of new people joining APUG moving away from Digital or adding analogue to their lives.

    It's not just analogue, though. I recently heard from a family member: "they still make Black and White film?" The basic attitude being, why would anyone want to do B&W now that color is cheaper?

    Matt

  6. #6
    BradS's Avatar
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    I agree. We need to perpetuate the craft and the best, most effective way to do that is through education.

    I don't think it is all about film and chemicals however. It seems to me, the digitial revolution started or, was at least enabled by, the disappearance of the Pentax K1000 (i.e. inexpensive, all manual camera) from consumer retail outlets. Overnight, the auto focus, auto exposure, auto pick-your-nose-for-you-so-that-even-a-brain-dead-idot-could-snap-a-photo cameras displaced the all manual 35mm slr at the low end and a generation of potential photographers were lulled further into the coma that is now known as digital photography. There was nothing interesting about photography. There is no challenge. You simply drop the film in the camera, point and click. You drop the roll at the one-hour lab and when it gets back you are further lulled to sleep by the sheer mediocrity of the results. Anybody can do it and get equally shitty results - so, who cares? Only the energetic and the rebelious could muster the energy to scratch further below the surface and discover the true craft. Face it, there is a whole generation of sniveling, fat assed, idiots growing up with no interest in life beyond the next release of thier favorite video game.

    As an aside, I noticed that the local Long's Drug store still has a place for Tri-X and Kodachrome 64 on the big film display wall (both spots are empty though ) and there is a bin in the photo isle at Walmart for B&W film (ok, so its not real B&W but....).

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Being out in public with the big camera helps. It may be a little eccentric, but in my profession that's allowed, and I don't mind attracting curious questions.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    \
    I don't think it is all about film and chemicals however. It seems to me, the digitial revolution started or, was at least enabled by, the disappearance of the Pentax K1000 (i.e. inexpensive, all manual camera) from consumer retail outlets.
    Right on. I have owned two versions of that camera, and it really was the perfect beginners tool. I still love calculating f-stop and shutter speed, and kids need to exercise the part of the brain that does that kind of practical math. Photography is great science. When kids make the connection between a scientific principle and practical results, they LEARN. With point and shoot, that element is removed.
    Robert Hunt

  9. #9

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    Not so easy...:-(

    I sell photo equipment for a living, and let me tell you, it is only the dedicated ones that even think about buying a film based system. The biggest wrench in the analog push is that people are, by and large, very happy with their digital cameras. Keep in mind that the vast percentage of photographers are snap shooters. The current crop of digicams are more than capable of giving them what they need, and they are cheap enough. Like it or not, the days of the new snapshooter using film are pretty much over. It no longer pays to have any compact camera fixed and digital cameras are just too convenient and cheap for most people to give up. It's the "serious" photogs that we should concentrate on... Only the people in which ultimate image quality is paramount will be interested. That has always been a minority of photographers, but the good news is that they are much more likely to pursue every angle to get the best results.

    Around here, most of the "artistic" types in schools still prefer to use film, mostly black and white. I try to keep them interested in moving up in formats, using different developers, etc to maintain interest, and it seems to work fairly well...

    Isaac
    See my adventures in Yemen here:
    www.isaharr.com

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhphoto
    Right on. I have owned two versions of that camera, and it really was the perfect beginners tool. I still love calculating f-stop and shutter speed, and kids need to exercise the part of the brain that does that kind of practical math. Photography is great science. When kids make the connection between a scientific principle and practical results, they LEARN. With point and shoot, that element is removed.

    We do sell several cameras like the K1000, but they are not even the most popular cameras among photo students. Most seem to want one of the entry level autofocus models instead, even if it costs a little more.

    Isaac
    See my adventures in Yemen here:
    www.isaharr.com

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