Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,689   Posts: 1,548,817   Online: 1079
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,241
    Images
    9
    No, I really don't see differently. On the other hand, when I am shooting color I have to see more than with BW. You have to see the color not just light, texture, relationship and contrast etc..... All of those things that make a fine BW print will make a fine Color photo as long as the color is taken into consideration along with everything else.

    Gerald, I do not agree that the subject of color is the color. It is one part of the whole though.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    243
    I've been shooting nearly 100% color since 1982. Color is a totally different type of photography. A successful color photo needs to be in color. It can't just be a photo that was taken with color film in place of B&W (the problem with at least 80-90% of color photos).

    The successful color photo does not work in B&W - or, will not work as well as a B&W. Seeing images that work because they're in color is a very difficult thing to do, and is what I find fascinating about working in color.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    696
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by steve
    I've been shooting nearly 100% color since 1982. Color is a totally different type of photography. A successful color photo needs to be in color. It can't just be a photo that was taken with color film in place of B&W (the problem with at least 80-90% of color photos).

    The successful color photo does not work in B&W - or, will not work as well as a B&W. Seeing images that work because they're in color is a very difficult thing to do, and is what I find fascinating about working in color.
    I disagree somewhat - I think a successful colour shot should have all the features a good B&W shot has (texture, contrast, form, etc) with colour being almost a secondary feature of the shot. Most of my own favourites work nearly as well as B&W as they do when colour is included.

    But that's just the way I see it ......

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    I agree with Graeme, a successful color image needs texture, contrast, form etc., but for me I warm highlights are something I look for. This is primarily the reason I don't shoot much B&W; I need to separate the two in my mind, since I look for something different when with B&W than color.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    dr bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Annapolis, Md
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    871
    Images
    14
    As this is the “philosophy” forum, allow me to philosophize a moment. I see some scenes that must be recorded in color. As I do mostly landscape, I see a lot of green stuff. To my eye, it is lovely shades and subtle differences in tone and color(s). I would love to make a b&w but after many years of experience, I know better. I know I will get a pallet of flat gray mud that does nothing for me. That scene must be in color to work. I am reminded of the famous picture of the Afghanistan woman with the colorful eyes in National Geographics (cover) a few years ago. Certainly that dramatic photograph would not have worked nearly as well in b&w.

    OTOH, there are images which I "see" must have a more dramatic rendering. Here I find that color can be very distracting. E.g., the portrait of a man wearing bright clothing such as a brilliant red bow tie or shirt when I really want the viewer to concentrate on his expression. Movies: the last scene in Casablanca of Ingrid Bergman looking back at Humphry Bogart as she walks through the rain to the departing plane.

    There are exceptions to all “rules”. What about the portrait of the 4-year-old dressed all in white standing against a gray background holding a brilliantly colored basket of flowers? B&w? Color? Why not both!
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  6. #16
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    I often have an expectation of what the setting will look like when shooting with a particular film. The expectation of the print will often change once I get to printing, but the initial 'vision' is often close. Some times there will be great deviation from intitial vision to final print and sometimes I have no idea when shooting and rely on the beauty of the media to pull me through. At the bare minimum I try to compose in a manner that will facilitate some aspect or goal -- as in: these colours in this patern would be great or these objects in this setting are so ironic/typical/unusual/grotesque/harmonious/telling/opaque. I generally know what conditions I am going to be shooting under and what the subject is going to be so I choose film accordingly, but I have often been dead wrong.

    *

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    243
    Quote Originally Posted by Graeme Hird
    I disagree somewhat - I think a successful colour shot should have all the features a good B&W shot has (texture, contrast, form, etc) with colour being almost a secondary feature of the shot. Most of my own favourites work nearly as well as B&W as they do when colour is included.

    But that's just the way I see it ......

    Cheers,
    I don't think I said anything at all about not having texture, contrast, form, etc. What would make you assume that wasn't part of a color photograph? Certainly I didn't rule out any of those elements. I also never addressed form, space relationships or any of the other myriad elements that go into making a successful photo regardless of media choice.

    The point I was adressing is that a color photo needs a REASON to be in color - otherwise why take it in color? Working "nearly as well" in B&W is exactly my point - thanks for making it again.

    Nearly working as well really means it doesn't work in B&W and needs to be in color - and NOT in B&W - and that's my point.

    Color work needs a reason to not be B&W. When the photo works better in color than in B&W, you've found the reason to make it in color.

    I also don't believe there's an "equal" point where a photo works equally as well in color or B&W. If that's true, then the photo is not fully resolved or realized if the choice of color or B&W doesn't matter.

  8. #18
    Carol's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Australia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    327
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    i think i see things in color a little more than i used to.

    anyone else see things differently?
    shooting b&w instead of color or visa versa and enjoying the results ?

    -john
    After concentrating on B&W for some time now, I have started to keep a roll of colour film in my spare camera. I have found that some things which have always been there suddenly attract my attention and they are subjects which suit colour rather than B&W. B&W is still the main focus of my attention, but there is room for both.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Floriduh
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2,272
    Images
    2
    I've gone back to shooting transparencies for color. For the longest time I got prints, but after going over my old slides and seeing some of the Astia and Provia shots from the past, prints just don't compare anymore. I've also recently thought about getting enlarged transparences and making a couple of light frames for them and maybe getting a projector. I feel that the one thing that you can trust is your taste in things changing form time to time.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    696
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by steve
    (snip) The point I was adressing is that a color photo needs a REASON to be in color - otherwise why take it in color? Working "nearly as well" in B&W is exactly my point - thanks for making it again.

    Nearly working as well really means it doesn't work in B&W and needs to be in color - and NOT in B&W - and that's my point.

    Color work needs a reason to not be B&W. When the photo works better in color than in B&W, you've found the reason to make it in color. (snip)
    I see we have very different philosophies Steve. Nothing wrong with that.

    I see in colour and I approach the idea from the other direction: a picture needs a reason to be in B&W for me to make it so in my print. It needs a reason to NOT be in colour.

    Every departure from the reality of a scene should be made through a conscious decision on the part of the artist, and removing colour from the scene is a pretty hefty departure from reality. Doing so should not be automatic - the choice of media is an integral part of photographic art.

    I'm not having a dig at you Steve: we simply see the world differently.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin