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  1. #21
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laz
    That photo, and the one of the young girl running down a road after a Napalm attack, will haunt me forever.

    -Bob

    I beleive that one was made by Mr. David Burnett...
    http://www.davidburnett.com/portfolio.html

  2. #22
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    I beleive that one was made by Mr. David Burnett...
    http://www.davidburnett.com/portfolio.html
    Vietnamese photographer, Nick Ut. Here's the story--

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4517597.stm
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #23

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    Another example would be the photographs of Dorothea Lange taken during the Depression for the WPA. For a sample look at http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/lange/

  4. #24
    laz
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    Life changing? I know the question being asked is speaking to profound changes, something that alters the course of one's life, but many things small and large change our lives every day. I think the more important thing great photographs can do is change our perceptions of the world; to have a window to someone elses life opened to us; allow us to see the world differently, more fully. I'm thinking not just of pictures of great drama or even of people or events. A landscape of a place near or far can make our world expand; like all art a good photograph allows us to see beauty more fully.

    A photograph allows the mind to soar beyond one's self.


    It'd been a very somber afternoon for me because of the memories evoked by seeing those 2 Vietnam photographs again. I was 14 when the execution photo appeared on the front pages, it made me physically ill. It was a time for me of great anxiety over the draft. Fear of being drafted dominated many of my generations' young men; It may be hard for those who did not live through it to understand how 14 year old boys could be worrying about a draft that would not come for them for another 4 years, but we did. Vietnam was the issue of the day along side civil rights. I feared nothing more than being drafted and sent to southeast asia with a gun to kill and be killed. And being sent to kill and die is what many did. There are names on The Wall I know, but all fifty thousand plus who died are better known because of photography. Since the day Matthew Brady set up his camera on that civil war battlefield, we've been able to see the faces of war. One hopes that someday the memory of those images, the faces of young men struck down before their lives really began, will help put an end to war, for all time.

    -Bob
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

  5. #25
    Gay Larson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    Wow, What a fantastic project to be involved with. I'd love to see the photographs.
    There will be a National exhibit on November 1st with portraits from 31 states, including three of ours in Washington DC at Union Station. I'll be there and just to brag on our photography group....we are being honored with an Adoption Excellence Award from the Federal Dept of Human Services. However, the award is nothing compared to the rewards of knowing children have permanent homes.
    Prints available in the APUG GAllery
    www.gaylarsonphotography.com

  6. #26

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    Yes, one photo can change life.

    Example: There is one photograph, which contains in lower right corner, sharp foreground image of African boy who is duying of hunger. In upper left corner on background is image of voulpter (is this right expression for bird which eat dead bodies of animals and humans...), blurred, which looks like waiting for boy to die and to eat boys body. Famous photograph. Well, when photographer showed that photograph to "civilized world" people started to ask questions like "did you feed the boy or you just take picture and passed buy" and like. After while, photographer who couldn't stand pressure, made suicide. He was 33 years old if I remember well. And I think he was Magnum photographer at that time.

    So, yes, one photograph can change life. Of photographer and person(s) which is (are) photographed.

  7. #27
    scootermm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    What the title says.

    Can one photo have so significant an effect that it might justifiably be called "life changing"?

    Examples?
    per the original comment. personally I think it can be "life changing" ....
    I read an article in View Camera and saw this image.
    (courtesy of Michael Mutmanskys' website)
    http://www.mutmansky.com/galleries/a...pits1_gum.html

    that image was life changing for me personally. hadnt done anything larger than 6x6 MF and it inspired me to attempt 4x5 and eventually (and presently) 7x17.

    so life changing I would deem it. since it now takes up so darn much of my life/time/money.

  8. #28

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    when i was in college, i studied art + art history
    and wrote a 30 page paper piet mondrain.
    somehow, while doing the research i came upon the work
    of laszlo maholy-nagy, i found one of the photograms that pretty much changed the way i thought about photography.

    http://www.geh.org/fm/amico99/htmlsr...tml#topofimage

    until then, a photograph had to be of something that was recorded with a camera, and a photogram was just something you did in your first photo-class when you emptied your pockets ( pebbles, lint, paperclips, pennies, good luck charms, frogs and everything else ) ... and got the outline of it all.

    the way mahloy-nagy used photo paper, objects and light to paint a 3-d image pretty much changed everything.

    (if you every want to see his "light prop" and the film he made from it "black white and gray" go to the fogg museum at harvard university. they have one of the 3 props, and the film that (at least they used to ) plug-in and show on a weekly basis. well worth it if you are into 30s abstract imagery.)

  9. #29

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    Marc Riboud

    I went to a Marc Riboud's photo exhibit yesterday in Kyoto. I missed the chance to see him in person at the opening a few weeks ago, but I'm glad I saw his original prints in a show.

    One of his famous photogpraphs is the one with a woman named Jane holding a little flower in front of the line of police guards during the anti-war protest back in the 60's. It's a beautiful photograph, I think.

    However, I recall similar events in some of the protests I attended between 2000 and 2002 in the U.S. where some photographers (seemingly professionals) tried to stage this for their own shots . I remember clearly when one photographer paid a young female protester a few bucks and gave her a flower to hold it in front of the police just like Reboud's photograph during the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia in 2000. This was all done in front of us in a large crowd of people, and we're booing him for doing that because that's immoral (and so lame). But it seemed that was apparently a kind of fashion for some photographers to manipulate, so they didn't stop.

    So, that's my take on this topic. Yes, one photograph changes people's lives and it's sometimes rather obsessive.

  10. #30
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laz
    No! The South Vietnamese was being executed by the Viet Cong! NOT AN AMERICAN!
    Actually, it was a South Vietnamese Colonel (General?) who was executing a suspected VC.

    Another one of those life-altering photos from the Vietnam conflict was Nick Utt's photo of Kim Phuc running down the street with her skin falling off from the napalm burns.

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