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  1. #11
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    Bruce Davidson. I'll take the East 100th Street photos over the in-yer-face ones any day.

  2. #12
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    I've taught a street photography workshop in Brighton, England for the past 8 years and have noticed some changes in how people respond. I sometimes ask permission but most of the time I make the exposure without speaking at all to the subject. If I think there is more photography to be done by engaging the subject in conversation I will. I mostly use a 20mm lens and sometimes an 80 to 210mm zoom mainly at the short end.

    Children are wonderful subjects but after I had a situation where a parent thought that one of the workshop participants' was photographing her child, accused us of being peadophiles and called the police I no longer point my camera in that direction. Clearly, as responsible people we must first think of the concerns of parents for sadly it's a strange world we now live in.

    My advice would be to make your photographs in whatever way you feel comfortable and don't be afraid to talk to people. Once you have plucked up the courage to do it are unlikely to have further inhibitions. My experience has shown that most people are happy to be photographed and even if they are not they are unlikely to attack you. Those who have refused me simply said no, or sometimes NO but never have I been physically threatened. A relaxed body language and pleasant manner will take you a long way toward achieving success. You should also make quick decisions and make the exposure immediately you see the shot you want for if you tend to hang around and be hesitant you will look uneasy and perhaps suspicious.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  3. #13

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    Maybe you should use one of those 90 deg lens attachments.

  4. #14
    laz
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    I take the shot then approach the person and tell them. I ask them to sign a release and promise not to use the shot in any way if they don't want me to. Either way I give them a personal calling card (I'm not a professional) and tell them to contact me for a copy if they want. (this takes them off the spot they would be in if I asked them to give me their address)

    I absolutely never take a picture of any child whose parent I don't know. As a parent I would have been made very uncomfortable if a stranger took a picture of my child, even if they came up and asked. Sad maybe, but the way of the world.

    -Bob
    [SIZE=1]I want everything Galli has![/SIZE]
    [SIZE=1]I want to make images like Gandolfi![/SIZE]
    rlazell@optonline.net

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    Children are wonderful subjects but after I had a situation where a parent thought that one of the workshop participants' was photographing her child, accused us of being peadophiles and called the police I no longer point my camera in that direction. Clearly, as responsible people we must first think of the concerns of parents for sadly it's a strange world we now live in.
    One of the things I want to try is to take pictures in a real crowded train in Japan. I don't know if I have to ask everyone in the train car first, which is almost like making a real announcement. I don't know it's all that necessary, and If I did that, I might miss the kind of atmosphere that I want to take pictures of. I know I'll need my SLR with a real wide-angle lens, so either way I'll be very noticeable to the crowd. The people in the crowd could probably tell this is not going to be a commercial photo shoot anyway (if so, you need a release form sign by everyone in the finished pictures, etc).

    So, do I still have to ask the entire crowd first? Has anyone done this sort of thing?

  6. #16

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    Whats important here is that you get the picture, your right to exercise your artistic vision should not be compromised in any way by the unknown wishes of your subjects.

  7. #17
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firecracker
    One of the things I want to try is to take pictures in a real crowded train in Japan. I don't know if I have to ask everyone in the train car first, which is almost like making a real announcement. I don't know it's all that necessary, and If I did that, I might miss the kind of atmosphere that I want to take pictures of. I know I'll need my SLR with a real wide-angle lens, so either way I'll be very noticeable to the crowd. The people in the crowd could probably tell this is not going to be a commercial photo shoot anyway (if so, you need a release form sign by everyone in the finished pictures, etc).

    So, do I still have to ask the entire crowd first? Has anyone done this sort of thing?

    I've done this in both the London Underground and the New York Subway using fast film, 3200 ISO, and my trusty 20mm Nikor lens. A useful dodge is to shoot blind, by that I mean don't put the camera to your eye and either pre focus or use auto focus. Clearly there is no way that you can sk everyone in the carriage. Another tip that I have found to be useful is if someone spots you and looks hard at you, I meet and hold their look but not in an aggressive way. I can't stress enough the need to be seen as not threatening.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  8. #18
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
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    * 17 mm Tamron, f11, HP5 - and shoot from the hip
    * 300mm and shoot only a few images before moving on or sit in a sheltered area.
    * TLR - nobody knows what you're doing, looking down into that box on your chest

    A person who agrees to have his or her picture taken is interacting with the photographer - not always what you want in an image.

    That said, I do not take pictures of children without parental permission- ever. Even then, I know you can get in trouble. My student, getting permission from two mothers to photograph their children playing in a park, was harassed and threatened by a third mother whose child may or may not have moved into the field of view some 30 feet further away.

  9. #19
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    Interesting ideas here, all. I definetely try not to take pictures of kids, unles I know them, becuase, as people have said, is quite sad, but that seems to be the way it goes.

    I'll see how people react next time I'm out and about with my camera. And, thinking about it, in a crowded city or subway, nobody's going to know what your doing, especially, as Whiteymorange noted, if you are using a TLR.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean
    I've done this in both the London Underground and the New York Subway using fast film, 3200 ISO, and my trusty 20mm Nikor lens. A useful dodge is to shoot blind, by that I mean don't put the camera to your eye and either pre focus or use auto focus. Clearly there is no way that you can sk everyone in the carriage. Another tip that I have found to be useful is if someone spots you and looks hard at you, I meet and hold their look but not in an aggressive way. I can't stress enough the need to be seen as not threatening.
    Thank you for your advice on this. I'll try that one of these days.

    The thing is, lately in Japan, there seem to be so many perverts who use their camera phones and other devices and hold them under women's skirts in the trains. They get caught, and that's onto the national news almost everyday. So apparently a lot of people do not feel comfortable when they have stand next to a guy who has a camera in a confined space. It's just crazy.

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