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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    What exactly constitutes "failure".
    Not getting across the idea you wanted, or not making the statement you wanted, or not making any statement, or not having any idea of what you want to say, or on a simpler note, not producing something that makes you happy, or that you yourself like. It's really easy to feel like a failure in those cases. And when one gets into one of those periods, it can be hard to get over it - "oh, I won't bother, I'm producing nothing but crap anyway." I know I've had times like that, and I'm sure a lot of other people on this site have had 'em too.

    There's an interesting book I've recently read called "Art and Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking" (ISBN 0961454733) that talks about this. At least one of the authors, if not both, is a photographer.

    Will

  2. #12
    blansky's Avatar
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    But a non depressed person would just call that growing pains.

    Remember the old line, we learn more from our mistakes than we do from our successes.

    Probably true.

    Anyway, I know what failure is, but in reality, it's just a plateau on our way up. Because if we look at it in a linear fashion, even when we think we've failed we are usually still farther ahead than we were a month, or a year ago.

    I remember when I was starting out in photography I would see someone's work and think, man, I'm nowhere near that good. But the beauty of it is you can wake up the next morning and start to go after it again.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #13
    cao
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe
    It's the McMansion crowd. Great big huge walls need great big huge art pieces.
    I could not in any way be thought of as living in a McMansion, but why not lots of little art? Seems one could fit quite a range of nice framed 8x10 and 11x14 prints in such spaces. It's probably a dumb question.

  4. #14
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    Creativity comes from not knowing what the hell you're going to do."
    Well, just now I reckon that pretty much makes me the most creative person on the planet...
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davec101
    ... except it's bigger and more boring and in color and much more expensive.
    One of my photogrpahy instructors often quoted (I don't know who is being quoted)

    "If you can't make it good, make it big. If you can't make big, make it red."


  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksmattfish
    One of my photogrpahy instructors often quoted (I don't know who is being quoted)

    "If you can't make it good, make it big. If you can't make big, make it red."

    I wonder where that leaves me; I like big pictures. My favorite size is 20x24. The first time I saw one of my images blown up to 30x40, I just fell over - I love that print.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  7. #17
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    I know what you mean. Most of my prints are 20x24. There is something definitely different about a print that is 20x24 and one that is 8x10. The are not the same print. So I think that women are right, size does matter.

    It may have to do with how a picture is viewed. An 8x10 is usually viewed at about 4-5 feet away and a 20x24 at about 6-10 feet away. Perhaps there is a stronger impression because of the size and the viewing distance.

    I'm also cognisant of the line that "if you can't make it good, make it big" but a bad picture in 8x10 rarely gets much better in 20x24.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #18
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    What Duane Michals says is so true. But I must say I made some prints for a show that were 30x40 and gee they looked nice. But then again they looked good as 8x10's as well.

    It makes me sad when I see people from our community slamming other participants when they post photos taken with "toy" cameras. Finally someone is doing something new, and all they get is abuse.
    www.ericrose.com
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    "civility is not a sign of weakness" JFK

    "The Dude abides" - the Dude

  9. #19
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    I nearly fell out of my chair at the "if you can't make it good, make it big..." line! Priceless, and too often too true!

    However, I can't agree with a broad brushed condemnation of all things big. I mainly print 8x10 and rarely any bigger for a variety of reasons (mainly practical ones), but I know this much: a bad 8x10 will be a HORRIBLE 20x-anything. It takes a good photo to actually stand up to being "exposed" to such minute visual inspection.
    And perhaps that is what Mr Michaels meant: you can't just blow up anything at all in hopes of making it more impactful through sheer size. I did not understand it as a condemnation fo all things larger than 8x10.
    Also, even 30x30 prints do not "require a gallery" as is mentioned in the quote. That is another point that I think moves beyond size itself and into the realm of questioning wehter the artist actually has anything to say if he is making his audience so extremely narrow as to include only those who have access to a gallery. Its a matter of exclusion of potential viewers rather than a discussion of size as an artistic merit in and of itself.

    Just my take on it - I am no artist,

    Peter.

  10. #20

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    Is not that just like D Michels..he is so bored with photography that he can not explain it and then use verbal multiple exposure to illustrate his boredom.

    If he is so bored with photography that he can not explain it he should have just said so and stopped.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

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