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  1. #51

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    Result.

  2. #52

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    The assumption in most of the answers above is that there is an answer. How can this be squared with the fact that our opinions about photographers can evolve? When I knew Joel Peter Witkin's work only from books I thought it too tricky by half. When I saw one of his big prints I was impressed. On first viewing Gabriele Basilico's work left me cold. A couple of years later I did a 180 on it. For me to maintain the position that I didn't know 'before,' but 'now' I do would be short-sighted as I have no reason to suppose that my opinions won't continue to change.

  3. #53

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    Great post. Coming from the premise that it takes other people to decide if you are a 'good' photographer.

    Should the number of followers who understand and appreciate a photographers' work be an indicator of whether they are good? I don't know if that fits either. It must be relative within their chosen genre. For Photographic Artists; a level of sophistication in their message and in the viewer is necessary in order to be successful (successful in the sense the viewer connects with the work). Also, the right circumstances may need to prevail in order for the viewer to connect with the work - which could take time.

    On the other hand, Salgado is widely regarded as good. He can gain a connection with almost anyone who views his images.

    I still think Passion is wishy washy. Yes it's an important ingredient to be good, essential to be great. But, what of the other specifics?
    Last edited by John McCallum; 02-25-2006 at 07:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #54

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    The Photographer!

  5. #55
    Andy K's Avatar
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    [size=1]What makes a good photographer?[/size]

    The same two things that make all good photographers. Parents.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Great post. Coming from the premise that it takes other people to decide if you are a 'good' photographer.

    Should the number of followers who understand and appreciate a photographers' work be an indicator of whether they are good? I don't know if that fits either. It must be relative within their chosen genre. For Photographic Artists; a level of sofistication in their message and in the viewer is necessary in order to be successful (successful in the sense the viewer connects with the work). Also, the right circumstances may need to prevail in order for the viewer to connect with the work - which could take time.

    On the other hand, Salgado is widely regarded as good. He can gain a connection with almost anyone who views his images.

    I still think Passion is wishy washy. Yes it's an important ingredient to be good, essential to be great. But, what of the other specifics?
    If having a following were indeed important how do we explain an artist such as van Goch. I took a long time for the following to emerge and unfortunately not in his lifetime. Granted his photography wasn't all that good.

    I stated passion because, it is often the driving force to learn the craft, and passion is contageous. Everybody responds to it and respects it.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #57

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    Yes, if the viewer senses passion in the image, it is bound to be attractive. Either passion revealed in the subject by the photographer or somehow imbued by the photographer stemming from his passion for the subject.

    The image Paul Sorenson just posted is a good case in point. I think it is a very touching image - even though I'm not that way inclined.

    And there's no question that passion is a pretty good motivator or the reverse; it might come as a consequence of success in meeting milestones along the way. I didn't meant to belittle its importance.

    Regarding a following - I think that is important to every artist/photographer (whether they acknowledge it or not). Well at least, it is important to have their work viewed and appreciated by others. The ones that are clever enough and have the courage, strive to line up the ducks so they are able to do it for a living. Prof portraiture and the arts are surely very rewarding.

    Some pretty visible angst can be found in artists who don't show their work. Down right scary sometimes. Van Gogh perhaps a case in point there. I haven't seen his photography either. Why wasn't he or the many classic American photographers that are mentioned so often in these discussions, wealthy during their own lifetimes? Was it only salesmanship that was missing in order for them to be successfull?

    Mentioning Salgado again - incidentally I love his work - has been described as one of the most influential photographers ever. At a guess he's doing ok financially from his current work, in his own lifetime. Misery and good work in humanitarianism sells.





    Not sure that my parents made a good photographer.
    Last edited by John McCallum; 02-25-2006 at 09:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #58

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    http://nobelprize.org/literature/laureates/index.html
    Read to the bottom and then relate to this discussion.

  9. #59

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    most of them are dead?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #60
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    The image Paul Sorenson just posted is a good case in point. I think it is a very touching image - even though I'm not that way inclined.
    I think the picture shows love. So I would guess that were all that way inclined.




    But I knew what you meant.



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.



 

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