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  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera
    Assuming you're over 21, that you have a car fetish
    And the poster of Maria Carey??
    Robert Hunt

  2. #82
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    This might be an "aside", but I can't resist:

    "The fact is that in painting, as in other arts (emphasis mine), there is no single procedure small enough to be stated in a formula. Look, I have wanted to measure out the oil to be put in my colour once and for all. Well. I couldn't do it. I had to judge it afresh every time. I believe I knew a long time before the "scientifics" that it is the opposition of yellow and blue which provokes violet shadows, but when you know that, you are still in ignorance of everything. There is much in painting which can't be explained and which is essential. You arrive before nature with theories, and nature throws them to the ground."

    I'll keep everyone in suspense, by not revealing the source of that quote. Hint: It was said by a Master of color.

    Damn! I'm searching my library for a certain passage, where a highly regarded critic admonished one of the Great Lights in art: "Someone should tell (him) that he has NO talent, and that he should give up painting for good"! If that advice was followed, art - and humanity wouldl have never enjoyed a wonderful, marvellous, MAGICAL body of work.

    This machine will time out soon. and I'll lose what I've entered here. I'll find the specific passage and quote it here, later.

    I'll will NEVER advise anyone to "give up". In "learning" photography, or any other art, the only logical course of action is to keep going. Stillman Clarke: "Shoot, shoot, and shoot some more. It will come. It WILL."
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #83

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    Ed, I like this:
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    There is much in (photography) which can't be explained and which is essential. You arrive before nature with theories, and nature throws them to the ground."
    At some point, whether painting, photography, playing the violin, or even ice skating, you are alone with the great mystery.
    Robert Hunt

  4. #84
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    This is from another forum: Communityzoe.com. I probably identify with this more than anything else I've read.


    "David", in Group: RE: How do we define good art from bad art:

    Some comments from Diane Arbus:

    "The thing that is important to know is that you never know. You're always sort of feeling your way."

    "One thing that struck me very early is that you don't put into a photograph what's going to come out. Or, vice versa, what comes out is not what you put in."

    "I never have taken a picture I've intended. They're always better or worse."

    "Invention is mostly this kind of subtle, inevitable thing. People get closer to the beauty of their invention. They get narrower and more particular in it. Invention has a lot to do with a certain kind of light some people have and with print quality and the choice of subject. It's a million choices you make. It's luck in a sense, or even ill luck. Some people hate a certain kind of complexity. Others only want that complexity. But none of that is really intentional. I mean it comes from your nature, your identity. We've all got an identity. You can't avoid it. It is what is left when you take everything else away. I think the most beautiful inventions are the ones you don't think of."

    "I hate the idea of composition. I don't know what good composition is. I mean I guess I must know something about it from doing it a lot and feeling my way into it and into what I like. Sometimes for me composition has to do with a certain brightness or a certain coming to restness and other times it has to do with funny mistakes. There is a kind of rightness and wrongness and sometimes I like rightness and sometimes I like wrongness. Composition is like that."


    An interesting read, probably transcribed from a conversation with her. Undoubtedly someone skilled in writing could 'polish' this ... but I think it communicates her thoughts with an unmistakeable clarity just as it is.

    I once read a story about "The Last Primitive Person" on the American Continent, a Yaqui Native American, who had been brought out of the wilderness and introduced into American Society in the early part of the twentieth century. After some months of exposure to the wondrous technology of the Indudstrial Revolution, he was asked which invention seemed to be the most impressive. Those asking the question were astounded by his answer: "The fountain pen." He couldn't imagine how it would be possible to get all those words into that "small stick" - and how they could flow out onto the paper, so effortlessly.

    I think, really, that one of my important goals: to eventually have my work "flow out", at least relatively effortlessly, - and MOST important, with a sense of FREEDOM, onto the paper.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #85
    127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    I think, really, that one of my important goals: to eventually have my work "flow out", at least relatively effortlessly, - and MOST important, with a sense of FREEDOM, onto the paper.
    That strikes a chord. I'm not much of a photographer, but I do consider myself a competent musician. I consider the greatest rock guitarist to be Eddie Van Halen - from the momment his first album came out rock guitar changed (something that can only really be attributed to him and Hendrix).

    Anyway the point is that millions copied him, hundreds maybe even got "better" - that is faster, more intricate, heavier, lounder etc they never SOUNDED like him. The reason was that they copied it and learnt it note for note, but for him (and other GREAT musicians) it was just the way he played. The notes aren't dictated by physical limitations (though it certainly explioted them), but rather the sound in his head came out of the speakers effortlessly.

    To prove the point he also played a bit of keyboard. You can take the keyboard parts, and play them on guitar, and they sound like EVH guitar parts - about as conclusive proof as you can get that the music was in his head, and it just came out through the instrument, rather than being created on the instrument.

    You can make similar examples in other forms of music, and other forms of art. That freedom to have something in your head, and make it real is the genius.

    Ian

  6. #86

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    Someone who takes at least 1 good picture. Dumb luck is as capable as skill but far less likely.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    I'll keep everyone in suspense, by not revealing the source of that quote. Hint: It was said by a Master of color.
    Kinkade?

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #88
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke
    Kinkade?
    No. Pierre Auguste Renoir.

    Interesting critique from one of the eminent critics of the day, writing in the Figaro, about Renoir's Torse au soliel:

    "Could someone please try to explain to M. Renoir that the torso of a woman is not a mass of decomposing flesh, with green and purple spots, that describe the state of decomposition of a body ..." The other paintings exhibited by, among others, Caillebote, Degas, Monet, Berthe Morisot, Pissaro and Sisley, encountered the same incomprehension and contempt.

    - From Philipe August Renoir, by Michel Ferloni and Dominique Spiess


    Would anyone say that that was "useful" criticism? - necessary in some mysterious way - to enable Renoir to "improve"?
    What a terrible loss to Art it would have been if Renoir - and everyone else, had actually listened to, and reacted to, this "top-notch" critic.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #89
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    Flipped

    Quote Originally Posted by billschwab
    Not as much as that damn dancing little banana!
    Thank God someone else saw it as well !, I thought The men in white coats would be here soon to take me to a rubber room on the funnyfarm !.

  10. #90
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Oh! You mean this one???







    Dave

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