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  1. #21
    Max Power's Avatar
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    I visited Budapest a couple of years back with some mates when we were on leave from duties in Bosnia-Hercegovina. Budapest seemed to be in the middle of a boom of sorts, and there was lots of renovation/construction going on. A point of pride for the citizens we spoke to was the complete overhaul of a massive urban park, in the middle of which stood a huge monument to the Soviet Union. I was fascinated that a people who so utterly detested the Soviet yoke would take up the renovation of this monument, as opposed to trashing it. The response to my queries as to the why was always, invariably, that like it or not, the Soviets are a part of the past of Hungary and Budapest and that the monument must stand.

    Just a thought,
    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  2. #22
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarEaglemtn
    So if it showed the hanging of a white horse thief, that would be OK?

    Idaho did hang people in the prisons awhile back so that method of execution was legal.
    That is not the point in this mural, yes, hanging was legal, and if I remember right it may still be in a couple of states...this is not a censorship issue, in the context of the current society, it is more offensive, given the history of America and it should be preserved and perhaps put into a display such as crimminal muesums are now a days, I can't see how it would further the relationships between the Native American Nations and the US, and the Native American Nations are unto themselves in America, it would be another step in the healing process between the communities, that if you live here, you would understand a whole lot better..I don't think the graphical depiction of capital punishment is acceptable in any public building..

    Dave

  3. #23

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    wyno

    Remember what the Taliban did to the giant statues of Buddha.....and the public outcry from the rest of the world.
    Mike

  4. #24
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    Bear in mind that they come right out and say that these murals don't depict any ACTUAL event in Idaho's history. Only what possibly could have happened given that particular artist's understanding of the attitudes of that earlier time. Perhaps I'm overly skeptical, but I doubt that an out of work artist in Southern California during the depression had an intimate knowledge of Idaho history. Anything is possible, but I think it extremely unlikely. It seems to me to be more of a "Hollywood" treatment of the subject. That, in turn, suggests to me that the only historical value of the murals is the simple fact that they hung in the building for 50 or 60 years. Other than that, they are certainly not "icons of Idaho history." Give them to a museum.

    Just my 2 lux.

    Bruce

  5. #25
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    Bruce,
    You may be correct, but trained artists generally have a pretty thorough history background. The historical importance may not be that the event happened as depicted, but that what was depicted was allowed -- or chosen -- to be painted on the courthouse walls.

    An out of work artist is a bit of a redundancy

    *

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcallow
    Bruce,
    You may be correct, but trained artists generally have a pretty thorough history background.
    Perhaps, but the odds of a Southern California artist of that era being well versed in local Idaho lore still seem a bit long to me...

    The historical importance may not be that the event happened as depicted, but that what was depicted was allowed -- or chosen -- to be painted on the courthouse walls.
    Touché.


    An out of work artist is a bit of a redundancy

  7. #27

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    The murals were painted in California and then moved to the court house. I believe they have value, but I don't think the court house is the appropriate place for them. Not because some people will find it offensive, but because they won't get the recognition that they may deserve there. I think it would be best to move them to a museum where those who can appreciate art and history will do so, and those who are offended can run along without stopping for closer examination.

    Everyone is offended by something and there is no way to ensure that all people are equally satisfied to the last degree. All we can do is compromise. Some people won't be happy if the murals are moved, and some people won't be happy if they stay. Moving them makes more sense as the murals could be better preserved in a museum than in a court house.

  8. #28

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    When any artwork is commissioned as a part of a structure, it does not get any special treatment if the structure is modified or removed. If it was a set of paintings it would be easy to move them to another location for viewing, but in the case of a mural on a public building, it is not art as much as it is decoration. So if the decor changes, so does the artwork. C'est la vie.
    I don't think it is a question of offensive or not. If it is practical to remodel the structure, then the changes could necessitate the removal of the mural no matter what the content. Some people however will use the content as a political tool to make a statement regardless.

    Lou

  9. #29

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    Actually keeping the murals up might remind society of the horrific acts done to others in the past and help to guide them not to do it again in the future. Since history has a way of repeating itself, having a constant reminder might just help stop it from happening again.

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