Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,907   Posts: 1,555,893   Online: 1017
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 52
  1. #1
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    14

    Is it possible to be a pro and not use digital today?

    So, do you think it's possible to be a professional photographer in 2006 (and beyond) and not use a digital camera? Let's put our analog emotions aside and use our common sense. Obviously, there is no way around having to have your film scanned, but is digital capture absolutely necessary? Do you think there are enough clients who respect film for you to be able to stay afloat financially? Could you have a predominantly analog workflow with an occassional digital rental? I'd like to know your opinion of any of these questions. Does anyone have direct experience with this?

    Personally, (once again, I'm being objective) because most clients have become so used to seeing images immediately, that this is no longer possible. I did a photoshoot for my company using my Blad and some rented lenses. The results were scanned professionally and blown up on to display boards of 14"x48" with breathtaking results. The detail was unbelievable sharp. I have a super critical eye and I was impressed by the results. No one cared how I shot it or what the resolution was. Yet, just last week we shot with this "hack" photographer with an outdated digicam and everyone at the shoot ooo-ed and ah-ed when the crappy images came up on his outdated Powerbook. This is what we're up against.

    Feel free to hijack this post with your own questions relating to the main subject. I want to know exactly how you feel about the future of professional analog photography.
    Ara
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    I think the business is changing, but there are photographers who make a living with just film, but even that number is getting fewer and fewer. We live in a McDonalds society, we want everything now, even if the quality is less.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,086
    Images
    194
    I would guess that architectural photographers will be the last to abandon film. Movements are crucial to their work in ways that photoshop can't really address successfully. True, scanning backs can be used instead of film on view cameras, but still I think that kind of work will remain traditional for a long time to come.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  4. #4
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    I am a working pro and don't use digital and am doing quite well for myself shooting my 35mm, MF and LF gear, in fact customers put effort out to locate me BECAUSE I do shoot film...

    R.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,520
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I think the business is changing, but there are photographers who make a living with just film, but even that number is getting fewer and fewer. We live in a McDonalds society, we want everything now, even if the quality is less.

    this is right on the money ...

  6. #6
    battra92's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    217
    I think it depends on what you do. If you say, shoot weddings, why not? I know of a couple wedding photographers who use 35mm and/or MF. So long as there are labs that do it, and you aren't working for a newspaper ... why not?

  7. #7
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Quote Originally Posted by battra92
    I think it depends on what you do. If you say, shoot weddings, why not? I know of a couple wedding photographers who use 35mm and/or MF. So long as there are labs that do it, and you aren't working for a newspaper ... why not?
    I actually do quite a bit of work for the newspaper here locally as well, but I have th ability to process and scan all of my own films and don't have to depend on a lab if I don't wish to, at worse I drop a roll at the lab, have the negs in about 20 minutes and run through their film scanner, still get work from them, especially color stuff.

    R.

  8. #8
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by battra92
    I think it depends on what you do. If you say, shoot weddings, why not? I know of a couple wedding photographers who use 35mm and/or MF. So long as there are labs that do it, and you aren't working for a newspaper ... why not?
    Yeah, newspapers I can understand. When you're printing at 85 lpi, you could use a cell phone for some photos (kidding).

    The wedding thing is a good point. I was talking to a woman I work with recently who happens to have expensive tastes (she brings her lunch to work in either a Nordstroms or Saks Fifth Avenue bag), and she stated that for her wedding they specifically chose a photographer who shoots film because they felt digital was like a bargain item and film was done by a skilled pro. There's still hope.

    Being a graphic designer, the industry I'm most in touch with professionally is commercial product photographers. Almost all of their shots are placed into layouts, so for them digital is the shortest and most convenient road.
    Ara
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

  9. #9
    Derek Lofgreen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    757
    Images
    114
    There is a good thread on this at Photo District News http://www.pdngallery.com/cgi-bin/ub...c;f=5;t=002066

    From what I can tell it seems there are plenty of pros using film. Probably more than you think. What is happening is the photo magizines and newsletters are all selling ad space to digital camera makers. So there content will be focused on digital. That's how they sell advertizing. Because of that it appears that "everyone" has made the switch. But in reality a lot of pros are still shooting film, MF and LF especially.

    In the end your images are what you are selling. Digital or film the capture is only the tool used to complete your vision. Market your vision and images and they will pay you for that, not by what your gear is.

    Personaly I never show the client the photos from a digital shoot until I have made color corrections etc. I don't know why photographers feel they need to chimp with the client. The photo isn't done when you press the shutter on a film camer why would it be done on a digital one?

    my 2 cents.

    D.

  10. #10
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Ghajanian
    Being a graphic designer, the industry I'm most in touch with professionally is commercial product photographers. Almost all of their shots are placed into layouts, so for them digital is the shortest and most convenient road.
    Ara
    But, I wonder how much of that is just the McDonalds mentality. With a Jobo processor and film dryer it is possible to go dry-to-dry (unprocessed to processed) in about an hour. A used Imacon scanner to scan the trannies, and depending upon the number of shots, you could be talking about less than 2 hours of processing time.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin