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  1. #11

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    I love to cook. What is a recipe?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  2. #12
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    I have lots of recipes for "finger foods", and I won't share them because they are digital.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    I don't know if Andy is deliberately misunderstanding this or not. I can only assume that he must be.

    "The end result" is good food. This could be almost any ingredients; it could be cooked over an open fire; or baked in an oven; or steamed; or shallow- or deep-fried; or stewed or cooked in many other ways.
    So you think the end result would be good food if you used a microwave and poor ingredients? I don't think it is me being deliberately misunderstanding here. I will spell it out for the obtuse:

    You... will... not... get... good... food... if... you... rush... the... process... and... take... shortcuts... , therefore... the... process... is... as... important... as... the... end... result...


    Did I write that slow enough for you to read Roger?*



    *for the deliberately obtuse, this too is a joke.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    I love to cook. What is a recipe?
    Dear Claire,

    Developing for 33 minutes and 32 seconds in Rodinal at 1+86, used at 72.5 degrees F with agitation every 114 seconds. NO OTHER APPROACH WILL EVER WORK.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    So you think the end result would be good food if you used a microwave and poor ingredients?
    Where on earth did I say this?

    No, you can't get good food with poor ingredients -- unless you're a really brilliant cook -- and there are a lot of things you can't cook with a microwave (and a few, such as bacon, that you can). What relevance has this to what I have written?

    Cheers,

    Roger

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    i am lost, how did we get to "who likes to cook" to microwave and frozen foods?

    I loved to cook and to entertain my friends over an evening of food and talk.

    And a nice bottle of wine!

    In fact, we are having company tonight! Better crack open the cookbooks!! And dinner at this time of year is at dusk, so maybe I'll make some portraits as well as a nice meal!

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    <SNIP>

    "The end result" is good food.
    There's the rub. (Well, I suspect that depending on the dish, Andy may be using a very nice dry rub, which I doubt is included in the TV dinner.)

    So, one important issue is that one's definition of "good" ... a good meal, in this case. To me, it's pretty clear that folks who live on processed and fast food (crap in my book), may think the TV dinner is "good". Andy and I (and I suspect Roger and Frances, too) vastly prefer a meal prepared from better ingredients, by hand, with care, etc.

    I suspect Roger has sort of assumed quality materials/tools (e.g., a camera/lens that is of high quality, film or sensor that is of good quality, accurate shutter and aperture control, etc.), of which there are lots of choices. I don't think Roger means an old 110 camera with horrible plastic lens and long-outdated C22 film can produce a superb photo for double gate spread in National Geographic, especially when compared to a Leica with Kodachrome 25. Granted the former could produce interesting results in the hands of a skilled photogrpher, but again the key issue is the definition of "good" for the result intended.

    What Andy has done is take Roger's statement "In both cases, too, it's the result that matters: how you get there is distinctly secondary" and pointed out that the analogy doesn't hold to the nth degree, which is the case for all analogies.

    I think Roger's central point is in his statement "Third, both are a state of mind rather than a matter of precisely following recipes: we've all met cooks who do everything by the book but whose meals are never inspired."

    IOW, give two people the same ingredients and a recipe, and the resulting meals can be quite different ... from disastrous to devine.

    FWIW, I agree with both of you.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl Dunbar
    I think Roger's central point is in his statement "Third, both are a state of mind rather than a matter of precisely following recipes: we've all met cooks who do everything by the book but whose meals are never inspired."

    IOW, give two people the same ingredients and a recipe, and the resulting meals can be quite different ... from disastrous to devine.
    That's about it -- though if you CAN produce a good picture with a nasty camera, once again, no-one cares about how you got it. What I was taking for granted was a higher degree of consensus about what's worth eating; it never occured to me that anyone would include TV dinners in this category.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  9. #19
    DBP
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    I love to cook when there is someone else to enjoy the result, and do it reasonably well. Living alone, I take a lot of shortcuts when cooking for just myself, especially with lots of good restaurants within walking distance. (One of the things I really miss from living in Manhattan many years ago is having a grocer's with good fresh vegetables down the street - it made it so much easier to pick up dinner ingredients on the way home.) Frankly there is some link to my approach to photography - which I also enjoy more with some positive feedback. And I am pretty sloppy with recipes in both, though more so in cooking.

    The microwave, to me, is like d*** photography. It does some things very well -bacon, as Roger mentioned, and steamed vegetables. It can also be a shortcut to adequate results with less set up and break down time.

  10. #20

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    I like to cook, but I'm not so good at following directions. I will look at a recipe to get the basic idea, sometimes even going so far as to follow it, at least the first time. After that I generally will cook by doing what feels right at the moment-a little more of this, a little less of that, although the basic techniques and ideas stay the same.

    This is a lot how I photograph; more by feel and emotion than intellect. I find that if I think too much my photos and food both suffer. I would rather do what seems correct at the time and critique it later which always helps the next attempt. This of course can only be done if one has an understanding of the necessary processes and techniques. I personally prefer a saute pan or a wok, give me a big flame and I'm happy. To make photos I do best with LF, B&W, and fiber base paper. I'm a simple person, it doesn't take too much to keep me going.

    As for recipe ideas, I find them everywhere, cookbooks, magazines, friends, restaraunts...

    Richard Waasserman

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