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  1. #111
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    It is the 3rd of June, 1976 - Fort Worth, Texas. It's not spring and yet not summer either. The freshness of spring has gone from the air. The oppressive heat of summer is hinted at by early afternoon. The kids are out of school. Our nation is already starting to celebrate its bi-centennial. The neighbors are gone on summer vacation and we're watching their house. None of us bother to lock our doors. There are power lines running through the yard, a peanut farmer in the white house and a hostage crisis that will change the course of politics in America and the middle east for years to come. We americans are still reeling from the "Energy Crisis" and our involvement in Vietnam. The neighbor's kid is home from college and parked his new, Japanese economy car on my side of the street. A house, a yard...a place to call home. More than even some Americans can hope for really. And yet, maybe this IS as good as it gets. Life can be like that.

    Yawn. ...indeed.
    Carter was president from 1977-1981. Ford was president in 1976. Interesting that the only completely unelected president happened to coincide with the bicentennial.

  2. #112

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    OK Grant. You've now had 11 pages of opinions without much general consensus but I suspect that you knew you'd get both of the above in advance.

    So who took the picture and why and what was your reason asking for opinions in a thread as opposed to the Critique Gallery?

    Genuine inquiry on my part by the way.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser

  3. #113

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    yea.. all those nobodies.. shore, sternfeld, eggleston, meyerowitz, atget, misrach, freiedlander, winogrand (they're just normal people walking around), evans, kertesz, klein, strand, doisneau. most of their work are just 'snapshot's of the world around them.

    i can understand not enjoying someone's work, or agreeing with a vision (that fact that i'd prefer a print by misrach or strand over one by ansel doesn't mean ansel wasn't a great photographer.. just means i prefer the other aesthetic more.

    and i have heard the same type of feedback about adams.. gee. .it's only a photograph.. how hard can it be to take a picture.

    jim

    Quote Originally Posted by davetravis
    I've never actually come across any ones dog (or granny, or kid) who actually can

    No kids or grannies?
    Perhaps not, but this is like elephants that "paint," and someone calls it "art."
    I'm glad I missed this nobody's "body" of work!

  4. #114
    DBP
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    I don't like it. I have never cared for the school of art that says that representations of ordinary things are art because they capture the essence of ordinariness in daily life, or some such drivel. Warhol was a one trick pony whose work was more interesting to talk about than to look at. This falls into the same category in my book.

  5. #115

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    The painting Georgia O'Keefe did of the night sky through an open tent flap opened my eyes to the magic possible by seeing the ordinary in an extraordinary way. For me, that is truly art.

  6. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Shively
    The painting Georgia O'Keefe did of the night sky through an open tent flap opened my eyes to the magic possible by seeing the ordinary in an extraordinary way. For me, that is truly art.
    One of my photography teachers always stressed that "impact" was created by taking an ordinary thing in an "unordinary" manner.

    The photograph is question that started this thread certainly doesn't do that for me.

    I think it was Polanski or Hitchcock that said if you want to create suspense or horror, don't use a medieval castle, use an ordinary apartment building or house. ( I think Polanski in reference to Rosemary's Baby)

    I believe the magic in photography IS the use of the ordinary or even mundane in an unusual manner. BUT just photographing the mundane doesn't pass the test.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    One can find significance in any finite visual pattern.
    JBrunner, I must admit that you have made me aware of my fondness for these collages of faded crappy house shots. If you live in the country, it's always a bit sad to see the houses for sale, because they are hardly glamorous, and the pictures are badly taken, usually overexposed etc.

    But like the Shore photo, I don't think I would have any fascination for such photos taken in isolation. I find that the one that was singled out at the beginning of this thread to be of little interest. Some photos work as part of a series/reportage, some photos work as a standalone object. There has been much debates about the serial/standalone issue in photo, given that the serial makes you closer to cinema. Still, I like Shore, and I find his best pieces stand alone.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  8. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    The photograph is question that started this thread certainly doesn't do that for me.
    Michael
    although i like Shore's work as a whole a lot, this individual image by itself doesn't work as much for me

  9. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    But you said previously that "it wasn't as scary".
    It isn't. It's your story that's scary.

    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    Does this innocuous middle American suburban picture now carry more weight.
    It carries more significance than it did before, because of the story you have told.

    As an image, on it's own, it doesn't carry any more significance than it did before, and doesn't (IMO) carry as much significance as Shore's.

    Shore's success is in implying possible scariness (maybe only to me!), which is, as your story indeed suggests, a part of life in Suburban America.

    For me, that's the mirror he's held up to us, and that's what makes him forward-looking for his time : not merely recording or documenting, not saying "this is what it is like" but "is this what it is like?"

    Cate

  10. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    It isn't. It's your story that's scary.



    It carries more significance than it did before, because of the story you have told.

    As an image, on it's own, it doesn't carry any more significance than it did before, and doesn't (IMO) carry as much significance as Shore's.

    Shore's success is in implying possible scariness (maybe only to me!), which is, as your story indeed suggests, a part of life in Suburban America.

    For me, that's the mirror he's held up to us, and that's what makes him forward-looking for his time : not merely recording or documenting, not saying "this is what it is like" but "is this what it is like?"

    Cate
    Cate, I'm not sure if you were aware when this thread started whose work, the picture in question belonged to, so I don't know if you are adding in elements or emotions to the picture that are not there for me.

    That being said, we live in different environments, with different life experience, but if you can, would you tell me, or try to analyze for me what in the picture, disturbs, implies danger, or what is it that leads to the conclusions you have described.

    I'm truly interested.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.



 

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