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  1. #31
    blansky's Avatar
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    As has been alluded to by others and irreverently mentioned by me in another thread is that all photographer take crappy pictures.

    We love to put our heroes on pedestals and think they can do no wrong but every "artist" goes through transitions, has a bad day, gets horribly bored and even has periods of genius. (maybe)

    But what is never mentioned is that they experiment, and some are failures. Perhaps they are housebound on a rainy week, or stuck inside in a cold winter, or their girlfriend left them, so they are depressed and they begin to "doodle" photographically.

    Some of what is out there are his doodling. And if you asked him about those doodles of his floating around he would probably cringe, while people are falling over themselves uttering exquisite praise in between fainting spells.

    This picture in question may or may not be that.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    "... But what is never mentioned is that they experiment, and some are failures..."
    Good point. There was an example of this at an Andrew Wyeth exhibit I saw recently. There were ten or fifteen sketches, watercolors, and tempuras done over a period of years that were nothing more than "studies" for his final painting called "Groundhog Day." Some of the studies included a person. Some included her dog, too. Most were done looking into her kitchen window. The final painting had none of these. It was done from inside the kitchen looking out.

    All the other sketches and paintings were just "experiments" that "failed" to convey his final vision.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob01721
    All the other sketches and paintings were just "experiments" that "failed" to convey his final vision.
    I must say that I am a bit confused. Like or dislike the photograph as you will, but I know of no historical information that suggests that this photograph was an "experiment" in any sense other than all our photographs are experiments in our struggle to define of our own view of the world. Weston was in his mid-40's when this photograph was taken and had been working at "realism" for several years. He also had been working on the "vegetables and shells" series for two years. It seems a tad presumptuous to suggest that someone was picking through Weston's trash to grab up his "experiments" and flog them as "final concepts". Most certainly this is not as famous as his "Eggs & Egg Slicer" or "Pepper 30" photographs, but it is as valid a "realistic" study as they.
    Cheers,

    Doug

    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    - Ansel Adams

  4. #34
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Thomson
    Weston took this photograph in 1929 and while today it seems cliche, in 1929 it was not. Weston was a pioneer of the art form and was very much challenging the accepted tenants of the day - in fact in 1929 he was challenging the "style" that made him famous. In 1930, he said, "I want the stark beauty that the lens can so exactly render, presented without interference of "artistic effect." Now all reactions on every plane must come directly from the original seeing of the thing...only the rhythm, form and perfect detail to consider." In this light I don't think it matters if the print was a Weston original or one printed by Cole, it was a print that reflected the simple, detailed images, utilizing commonplace objects.

    Now the question is, "Is this a good photograph", not "Do you like this photograph." I would postulate that the "goodness" of this photograph is very much related to the "period" in which the image was taken, and the intention of the photographer. To do other is to partake in a kind of artistic revisionism. So, while I don't particularly "like" the photograph, I think it is a "good" photograph.

    n.
    I find I agree very much with Doug's opinion here, it says exactly how I feel about the photo. It did not knock my sox off the first time I saw it, nor does it now, but with Dougs thoughts in mind I also think it indeed is a "Good Picture". If I were to receive it in a print exchange, I wouldn't be too disappointed. It however would never hang in a place of honor in my house.


    Just my opinion,
    Charlie...............................

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Thomson
    "... I must say that I am a bit confused. Like or dislike the photograph as you will, but I know of no historical information that suggests that this photograph was an 'experiment' in any sense other than all our photographs are experiments in our struggle to define of our own view of the world..."
    Doug, I was referring to Wyeth's "studies," not Weston's photograph.

  6. #36
    Doug Thomson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob01721
    Doug, I was referring to Wyeth's "studies," not Weston's photograph.
    Sorry, I did understand that, but thought you were using it to illustrate a point about the Weston image. Interesting discussion methinks.
    Cheers,

    Doug

    A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
    - Ansel Adams

  7. #37
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I'll ask the reverse: Is this a "bad" photograph?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    I'll ask the reverse: Is this a "bad" photograph?
    Please understand that I am a fan of Edward Weston.

    Is this a good or a bad photograph? I see nothing from where I see it that elevates this photograph to the level of greatness. Nor do I see anything that would diminish it to obscurity.

    I would hazard that if this photograph was made by some obscure photographer, it would not even be a matter for this discussion. It is the link to Weston that brings this to the fore.

    This eggplant is a photograph of a "known object". It does not present the transitory aspect of his famous pepper photograph wherein the pepper becomes something different and greater then a pepper. That being that it (the pepper) becomes a study in universal form as apart from and in addition to a "known object".
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  9. #39

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    Here's another photo of "Known Objects". This is what happens to all the fruit not consumed after a food shoot and when one is waiting for film to come back from the lab. No wonder I became a landscape shooter.

    BTW the moon is a cantaloupe wedge.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails fruit landscape.jpg  

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser
    Here's another photo of "Known Objects". This is what happens to all the fruit not consumed after a food shoot and when one is waiting for film to come back from the lab. No wonder I became a landscape shooter.

    Do a series of these and they'll make you a fortune.



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

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