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  1. #11
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    Thanks for the link! I just spent some time checking out the different threads there and I must say I am now even more paranoid than before! I guess I have been somewhat lucky (or maybe being 5'10, 250lbs helps) compared to what many people at PhotoPermit.org describe. It's the "photo vigilante" who I am most concerned about. My fear is not knowing what level of stupidity he or she may reach while "defending" or "enforcing" some imaginary rights. Unfortunately here in Florida very little can be done when one's civil rights have been violated. If you have the time and money to spend on a top notch attorney, then you might get some justice and possibly monetary restitution. In my case, I would be out one of my treasured collectable cameras and/or lenses.
    If you look at the posting dates, you'll see tat "vigilantes" are rather rare.

    If you get one, assuming they're not nutty (I was verbally and profanely assaulted once at SLC airport -- in front of my small children -- by a woman who was freaked out by me carrying a camera, which I was not using. A few minutes later the PD came by and carted her off), the best strategy is usually to start asking them questions and treating them like a helper. Makes 'em feel important, and often they WILL be helpful....

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  2. #12
    snegron's Avatar
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    I am starting to think that the best approach is to simply lie and say that I am working on a book about one or another particular region and I am gathering visual research. After all, books take a long time to complete and it seems somewhat believable. Maybe not ethical, but after all, it's the paranoid lunatics that forced this situation to begin with.

  3. #13

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    It really varies a lot depending on where you live. I have gone down to southeastern New Mexico, to Carlsbad and Artesia and shot all over the place, with a tripod at night. People walked by and said hello, even the ladies. Cops drove by without even slowing down. I must say I wouldn't mind living down there if there were plenty of jobs in my field and it wasn't so hot. Around here (I'm one of the victimized posters) I'm not going out as much since I was assaulted.

    Another suggestion: Don't go out alone. Yes, people are impatient with photographers because we stop so often. Try taking a dog. I've never had any trouble when taking a dog along. It distracts people and they are afraid of getting bit.

    Doug

  4. #14
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    ....simply lie and say that I am working on a book...
    Why not make a book then?

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  5. #15
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke
    Why not make a book then?
    That doesn't sound like a bad idea! Problem is I would probably have to sell half of my equipment just to get it published...

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    That doesn't sound like a bad idea! Problem is I would probably have to sell half of my equipment just to get it published...
    Just do a small limited edition book on your own. Print yourself and mount, and then find a local binder to bind them for you with a cloth cover. Or something like that. Just do 10 or 20. Or 1 or 2.

    I saw a gorgeous one of Eggeseton's at the MOMA, hand done prints, all mounted in this large gorgeous leather book. Not sure how many were in the addition, but I'd gather not many. I wanted to flip through it so badly, but alas it was in a case.

  7. #17
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeMitchell
    Just do a small limited edition book on your own. Print yourself and mount, and then find a local binder to bind them for you with a cloth cover. Or something like that. Just do 10 or 20. Or 1 or 2.

    I saw a gorgeous one of Eggeseton's at the MOMA, hand done prints, all mounted in this large gorgeous leather book. Not sure how many were in the addition, but I'd gather not many. I wanted to flip through it so badly, but alas it was in a case.
    By mounting do you mean like in traditional wedding album style? I had not thought about it, but I remembered there are several companies that provide albums in book style print.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    By mounting do you mean like in traditional wedding album style? I had not thought about it, but I remembered there are several companies that provide albums in book style print.
    I just mean finding a nice cotton rag/rice/'archival' paper that a binder is able to hinge or Japenese bind or etc, and then mount your image to this, probably dry mount. I'd probably also opt for tissue btwn pages.

    It's a lot of work, but when finished it should be a 100% hand done book.

    There are very nice pre-made books you can buy for scrapbooking and albums which are just blank pages w/ tissue, you could do one of these w/ photo corners or artists tape and do a book-portfolio-album of your town.

    Or, go the very opposite direction and start a blog on the town with scanned prints and stories from your ramblings, what you see, who you meet.

  9. #19

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    I have self-published a postcard book with my photos (30 images), which is small enough to be a very handy sample package on some occasions. That's done half digitally, so I don't want to self-promote too much in this site.

    But when I approach people to take their photographs, I say a very few words like, "Can I ...?" That usually works. Or a bit of a smile on my face before framing the camera and firing the shutter.

    When they ask me where those photos will end up, I say "in my portfolio."

    For this reason, I don't run a website for myself but just give them my email address and phone# in case they need to contact me. I just try to stay away from the commercial aspect of photography at this point.

    But other times, I don't ask permisson to anyone and just snap away.

  10. #20
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    I have to admit that when I shoot in smaller towns I have more concern about this than walking around NYC. A lot of the concern is probably in my own head - a kind of self-conciousness that people are all looking at me wondering what the hell I'm doing.

    I find that once I just "do it" and start shooting I get over the self-conciousness as I "get into the groove" of framing and composing etc.

    Also, when I see a kid as a potential subject I often "bracket" shoot him or her by taking pics of other people or scenes in between. This (I like to believe) makes it less "treatening" since I'm not just "concentrating" on the kid like some kind of pervert.

    Probably all this more resides in my own head rather than reality - but it is true that to a considerable degree - street photography is "intrusive" toward others - and it's wise to be sensitive to that fact.

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