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  1. #41

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    Okay, I would have no problem with the exhibit if they called the prints what they are: posters.

  2. #42
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Shively
    Okay, I would have no problem with the exhibit if they called the prints what they are: posters.
    Agreed. If I went to a gallery expecting to see fine art prints, I would leave if all I saw was ink jet prints.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by severian
    Edward Weston's sons could not make a more successful realization of Edward Westons vision because they are not Edward Weston.

    Jack
    Jack:

    This is an interesting outlook, and I certainly see a lot of logic in it, but I also think of some other parallels.

    I think most photographers who print and then reprint their work find that their prints change and evolve over time. I would guess that at least some of that change may very well arise because of feedback from others' reactions to earlier versions.

    I certainly have learned new things about my own photographs because of the inciteful comments of others - in essence my vision (concerning a particular photograph) isn't necessarily static.

    I think it is clear that each print is an interpretation - a performance if you will. I think it follows that just like in music, there is the original author and the original piece, and then there is the performance, and sometimes the musician who wrote the piece, learns a lot from someone else's performance of it.

    I would expect that there are Edward Weston photographs which have been printed by his sons which, if he had the opportunity, he might have said something like "I wish I had thought of printing it like that - it communicates much more of what I intended when I made the exposure in the first place".

    Examples of this might be few, but the incorporation of an additional artistic sensibility into the process certainly makes it possible. This is what I was trying to refer to in my original post.

    Thanks for your response to my post.

    Matt

  4. #44

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    In Japan, there are quite a few museums (and/or galleries) that occasionally run the exhibits of the works of some famous artists by setting up with the replicas, not the original pieces. Some purposes of digital imaging are very similar to this. It's pretty shocking.

    Would I even bother to go to these shows? No, I'd rather stay home and watch TV. That way I might have a better chance to see the original works on a public channel.

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanders McNew
    And, as bad as you all think inkjet prints are, can they be any worse than the tiny crappy versions reproduced in countless copies of Let Us New Praise Famous Men? As between those small blurry facsimiles and the large-scale inkjet prints now on display, which do you think Evans would have preferred as a medium for the public to encounter his work?

    Sanders McNew
    www.mcnew.net/portraits
    Sanders:

    I will acknowledge ink jet prints there place. As I would also acknowledge newsprint, gravure, or any visual printing technique you could think of. The question I always have when I see ink jet prints in an exhibition is why are they "masquerading" as photographic prints? I can't support this idea and have voiced it in several threads on this forum, (and anywhere else I can get an audience).

    Regards,
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  6. #46
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've had the experience occasionally of seeing photos in a gallery that I had known previously from books and being surprised by how small and intimate the originals were, usually because they were contact prints.

    Once certainly learns more about the early career of Andre Kertesz, for instance, by seeing his 3x4"and smaller contacts than by seeing modern poster-sized enlargements. Look at these and pay attention to the dimensions, particularly for any print earlier than 1927--

    http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2005/...rtesz_ss1.shtm
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #47

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    think on these things

    Sanders,
    good thread. Makes me think about issues that I would rather avoid.

    Jack- Severian, Autarch of Urth

  8. #48

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    Is the composer of piece of music the only one who can successfully conduct it?

    In my opinion, the only things that matter are whether the exhibit looks good, and they're honest about the works on display. I've no idea whether that's the case here. I'd have to go look.

  9. #49
    Mike Té's Avatar
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    A very thought-provoking thread...

    The digital process allows Mr. Hill and Mr. Martson to uncover details embedded in the negatives, outside the tonal range of the old silver gelatin prints: a shadowy girl in the doorway of a roadside stand near Birmingham, Ala.; numbers painted on a telephone pole beside a gas station in Reedsville, W.Va.; penny-picture faces in a window of a photographer’s studio in Savannah, Ga. The new prints modulate and unify the midranges of grays in these pictures to soften contrasts and give a warmer ambience to photographs that were often sharp and austere in Evans’s gelatin silver prints.
    This one part of the article seems to suggest that the digital process "allows" a more refined or at least more complete rendition of the information contained in the negatives. I can't help thinking that this sounds like the the author of the article is underestimating Walker Evans, as if presuming that he wasn't aware that those details are present in the negative. Mr. Evans was surely aware of what he was shooting and printed what he desired to show in his prints, just as the digital printers decided to print the negatives in their own fashion.
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  10. #50
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Yes, I think Evans preferred the sharp and austere to the warm and soft.

    Before Romanticism there was generally no particular attention paid to the intention of the artist or its corollary--the integrity of the text. In the 1700s it wasn't unusual to perform Shakespeare's tragedies with happy endings. While I have reservations about seeing artistic intention as the whole meaning of a work, and might find interesting really radical reinterpretations of old negatives as new art, the concept of "softening" Evans's austere renderings of his own negatives just seems feeble to me.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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