Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,713   Posts: 1,483,019   Online: 692
      
Page 8 of 22 FirstFirst ... 23456789101112131418 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 216
  1. #71

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    ...photography departments in schools were separated from the other arts...
    Yes, but at least when I was applying to art school (before deciding to read law instead) there were separate courses and qualifications for applied and fine art photography.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  2. #72

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Datchet, Berkshire UK- about 20 miles west of London
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    342
    "can someone define "Fine Art Photography" for me please?"

    Nah, that would spoil all the fun. Just think about all the empty lives if everything had agreed definitions.

    Indicators might be--

    Fine art costs more than the buyer thinks its going to

    Its fine art when its sold through an expensive gallery, with multiple mark-ups.

    Its fine art when the seller or photographer think its good.

    Its fine art when its only functionality is to cover that stain on the wallpaper.

  3. #73

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    photography has always been the ugly cousin of the art world.
    photography departments in schools were separated from the other arts.
    no matter how much people have tried to pass it off as "fine art"
    it is looked down upon ( much the way analog/analogue photographers look down upon people who use digital photography).
    Like ceramics and textiles aswell, there's still a lot of snobbery about subjects that were seen as 'crafts' - but I do think it's changing, the boundaries are much more blurred now.

    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    not saying that photography isn't or can't be artistic, it can, it is just a hard sell ... i am still trying to figure out what "fine art" is... a lot of what i see doesn't seem to me to be art or fine ...
    Something about 'fine art' it's a snobbish thing originally, the idea of the purity of art, the academic nature of it, unsullied by lesser art...
    Ultimately, we choose to call it what we want. I call my work photographs, because I feel comfortable with that, but I definitely believe that photography can be an art form. Whether it's 'fine art' or not ....well, that's partly playing the game of the inventors of that term in the first place, and it's an argument that I think is quite sterile. Also quite divisive when those with 'legitimate' claims to speak about these issues (through being involved in the academic fine art world) appear to lay down limitations for it's full enjoyment and understanding by those outside the academic walls.
    Cate

  4. #74

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    Hello Cate,


    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    In some ways this discussion reminds me of a recent thread on technique in photography, what it means to us, the different elements that are or are not important or necessary, and the value we give to them.
    I recall that thread. It was a very interesting discussion. Glad you reminded me of that one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    Art is about many things and takes many forms. Fundamentally it is about expression and communication - of ideas, thoughts, emotion, feeling - different combinations, different elements. It can be an art primarily of ideas, or it can be a very personal journey of the artist. Sometimes context and analysis is important, even vital, sometimes it isn't, and the power of the art transcends everything else.
    Nicely stated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    Photography is as much of a fine art as pottery can be (when the use of the pot is to be looked at rather than used). It is also fundamentally about communciation.

    What makes it beome 'art' as much as anything else, can be about beauty, and what makes us wonder about the world and what it is to be human.

    Cate
    Agreed. I tend to get wordy in some of my postings, but Cate, you have stated this very well in much fewer words. Well done.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  5. #75

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    . . . . . . . Also quite divisive when those with 'legitimate' claims to speak about these issues (through being involved in the academic fine art world) appear to lay down limitations for it's full enjoyment and understanding by those outside the academic walls.
    Cate
    I think when looking at art history there have constantly been attempts to define or structure art, or fine art. The funny aspect of that is the many great movements of art that were in rebellion to established, highly regarded, or accepted academic notions. The Impressionists, Expressionists, Surrealists, and Dada were some prominent and recent rebellions to the established notions, and attempts of structure by noted museums and academies. Obviously not everyone likes the various works from this time period, but whether or not someone likes the works should not dismiss them as art.

    Just to take the Expressionist time, many of those artists could not get exhibited in the major salons and galleries of their day. Those established and highly regarded institutions attempted to impose a formal structure to art, mostly painting and sculpture during that time. It was only later in time that the Expressionist movement was recognized. This cycle has been repeated many times prior to that, and since that time . . . and probably will continue.

    The museums and galleries attempt to control or define what is art, or what is not art. Exhibits outside established museums and galleries could be viewed as rebelling against establishment. There is rarely consensus in art; almost anything goes.

    My feeling is that if anyone feels confused by my paintings or photography, then I have failed. Hopefully I avoid creating art for artists and people outside acidemia can appreciate what I create.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  6. #76

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by HerrBremerhaven
    I think when looking at art history there have constantly been attempts to define or structure art, or fine art. The funny aspect of that is the many great movements of art that were in rebellion to established, highly regarded, or accepted academic notions.
    Dear Gordon,

    Indeed, and this is why I am deeply suspicious of '-isms'. They are rebellions against, and attempts to structure, rather than an attempt to be true to a vision. The term 'impressionists' was (as far as I recall) originally an insult, while Fauves, Dadaists, Futurists and Modernists were essentially bandwagons.

    Photography, since the Linked Ring and Camera Work (with its poisonous, pretentious hangers-on) has sometimes outdone painting as a source of worthless sell-righteousness.

    Cheers,

    R.

  7. #77

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    Hello Roger,

    Exactly. Some academics might belittle or dismiss efforts of those they consider outsiders. However, there is now even an established outsider art movement. Anyone should be careful dismissing something as art or not art because those in the future could likely see our time in a different manner.

    Seems the history lesson has been that art was mostly defined in hindsight. I cannot predict the future, but I would place a good guess that more aspects of photography will be accepted as fine art in the future.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  8. #78

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Dear Gordon,

    Ah! The Established Outsider! A perfect definition, cf the YBA (Young British Artists).

    Cheers,

    R.

  9. #79
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,029
    But why would anyone care what the "academics" have to say anyways.

    I would be interested in seeing their lists of accomplishments.

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  10. #80

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    But why would anyone care what the "academics" have to say anyways.

    I would be interested in seeing their lists of accomplishments.

    Michael
    Hello Michael,

    I suppose one might care about the academics just enough to not be like them. That would be the rebellious aspect, or lead into outsider art.

    Quite likely some academics have done well. More likely (in my opinion) is that they did little to nothing to advance art movements, other than inspiring others to not agree with them, and not follow their suggestions.

    Does having a degree in fine art make me an academic? Am I not allowed to rebel against established movements in the world of art?

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin