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  1. #11
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dorothy Blum Cooper View Post
    Well said, Alex.



    Thanks for not 'personally' bashing me Seriously...I simply saw the preview this evening and was impressed at how someone would base an entire movie (much as books have been written) on this one image. It's impressive as hell how one photograph can speak volumes.



    Ok, hear goes. I didn't want to politicize the 'image' aspect of my post (affiliating myself with the NYT). However, it's an institution (the NYT) whose time has come and can quietly go off into the sunset as far as I'm concerned. I saw their article with a decent write up. So, the connection with 'me' and the NYT was made when I shared their link. I'm just not a huge fan. I posted this in the good faith that it would be what it was started to be. The image and the impact of photography and what it has created for others. Maybe I shouldn't have posted my 'opinion' on the NYT. Just didn't want my fellow conservatives to think I was cavin'.
    Actually, Dorothy, it was your comment about the NYT that seemed to undermine your very request not to make it political.

    But that's transparent.

    I prefer to discuss this on the historical plane.

    Very difficult choices had to be made at the time. The men who raised the flag were an immediate icon. And, if the decision had been to invade mainland Japan and fight a ground war - they would be critical to helping maintain the support of the home front.

    In the end, the decision was made to use the Bomb. And the question then arises - did the attempt to "use" these men further damage them beyond the trauma they'd expreienced fighting one of the most hellish battles ever fought?

    Oh, BTW, I think you will find that even the most conservative of thinkers reads the NYT - I think they consider it an exercise in "knowing thy enemy".

  2. #12
    Dorothy Blum Cooper's Avatar
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    Oh, BTW, I think you will find that even the most conservative of thinkers reads the NYT - I think they consider it an exercise in "knowing thy enemy".
    Ah...but that doesn't necessarily mean they are fans.

    "Keep your friends close but your enemies closer."

  3. #13
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    The book was written by the son of one of the flag raisers (Rosenthal's picture). Of the three that even made it off the island, he was the only one that lived a full life. Ira Hays and the other man both succumbed to alcoholism. As we all know, Joe Rosenthal just recently passed away. Hays was the subject of a movie centered around him and portrayed by Tony Curtis in the late 1950s.

    I noticed that the movie is directed by Clint Eastwood. I'm sure he will do it as much justice as a film maker can.
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  4. #14
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley View Post
    The book was written by the son of one of the flag raisers (Rosenthal's picture). Of the three that even made it off the island, he was the only one that lived a full life. Ira Hays and the other man both succumbed to alcoholism. As we all know, Joe Rosenthal just recently passed away. Hays was the subject of a movie centered around him and portrayed by Tony Curtis in the late 1950s.

    I noticed that the movie is directed by Clint Eastwood. I'm sure he will do it as much justice as a film maker can.

    Yes, Clint Eastwood is one of the best, if "quieter" directors around. That this is his project makes it more compelling. He is one of those artists who carefully chooses his "shots" - his reputation is secure and he projects true integrity.

    BTW: I "googled" the Battle. It finally ended in March of '45 - having taken over a month.

    At the same time, the war in Europe was winding down (Germany surrended in early May) and soon ended.

    To support Britain, the US had placed the ETO as the primary battlefield of WWII. With the ETO gone - and the nascent cold war with the FSU rising - protracted, very bloody ground warfare against Japan in the PTO was frightening to the Truman administration.

    How could you be celebrating a victory agains "Der Fuerer" in Europe while men were dying in Japan?

    And Iwo Jima seemed to be a particular omen. If the Japanese would give their all (this was the battle that memorialized the concept of the Kamakazie) for one tiny islet - how much more fiercely would they defend the mainland?

    This was the unanswerable question.

    And then, in July of that year (1945) there was The Trinity Test.

    What I think is interesting about Eastwood's approach is that he zooms in from the big events swirling around these men to what it meant to them as individuals. Yes they are icons - but that also they lost something by becoming so.

    This movie could only be made now (or maybe, less well, 30 years ago when there was also an open window to reflection).

    Unlike a lot of recent movies dealing with this era (e.g. Saving Private Ryan) I think I want to see this one.

    After all, Eastwood did such a great job with Charlie Parker that I want to see what he does here.

  5. #15
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    Unlike a lot of recent movies dealing with this era (e.g. Saving Private Ryan) I think I want to see this one.
    Well, it the movie is as strait forward as the book was it should be great. No invented charcters or hollywood love triangles (Pearl Harbor) or stuff like that. Just strait forward biographies on the six guys, a detailed retelling of the battle for Iwo Jima, and how the fame affected the survivor's lives afterwards.

    Should be good.
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  6. #16

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    since we're talking images and their effect on the social psyche, what about the image by Nick Ut http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/co...OLLECTI_1.html

    that one image brought the reality of what was happening to nearly every household, I remember hearing about it, and I was but a lad of 11 at the time.

    If one searches for info on Kim Phuc (the girl in the photo) there's an amazing story of survival and what she endured afterwards. just one of many hits: http://advance.uconn.edu/2004/041108/04110803.htm


    erie

  7. #17
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    The movie sound something like "THE BEST YEARS OF THEIR LIVES" kind of thing, from what I gather. Only instead of a bunch of unknowns returning to their small town, this uses men who were immortalized in one of the best know pictures to date.

    The fact that this picture is almost perfect in it's composition is obviously part of its draw.

    The other thing is that the US is a very "military" republic and as such thrives on iconic representation of militarism.

    Possibly the most "unmilitary" representation of a war or war action is the Vietnam Memorial and if you'll remember that it was not well received at first. Then later universally celebrated as a solemn reminder of the people that were lost not just the iconic general on a horse or posing soldier type memorial. Although that was later added to the Vietnam Memorial for some reason.

    As for the one photograph so perfectly representing "and our flag was still there" kind of thing, this picture is iconic perfection.

    Undoubtedly Eastwood used this idea, because like most of us he wondered, where are they now. Who were they, are they still alive? Ingenious filmaking to take a iconic image and create a story around it.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #18

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    Just thought I'd mention that Eastwood has made 2 movies out of this one event, the other being "Letters from Iow Jima" which tells the story from the japanese perspective. All things being equal as Eastwood has made both it will be interesting to see the reaction of most people to the films, I assume the west will prefer Flags and the far east will prefer Letters....

    If come awards time, they are to receive acclaim it would be lovely to see both versions honoured equally as they are opposite sides of the same coin, then again they may suck and fight it out for the Razzies.

    be well

    Seamus
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    Last edited by SeamusARyan; 10-02-2006 at 03:10 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

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