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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeMitchell View Post
    You must be thinking of Hiroshi Sugimoto?? He's a LF black and white master. Though he's doing color work now.

    You make it sound gimmicky, but it's all gorgeous work.

    His seascapes are wonderful too.

    Link: http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/works/theaters/
    I guess in a way I meant for it to sound gimmicky, but what I was trying to say is that a lot of conceptual or cutting edge (how ever one defines that!) art can first appear that way. But if one can get past that idea, it may have a very valid message. I look at a lot of contemporary art with a very skeptical point of view. That does not mean that down the road I do not accept the work as valid, important or relevant to me in some way. For example I do find relevance in Ad Reinhardt's black canvasas, but I still do not find the work of Jeff Koons anything but pure schlock.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by davetravis View Post
    It seems that at every show I do, I get at least one fruitcake who wants to argue some abstract point with me about photography. I've pretty much talked it all, so too many to list here.
    But this one guy at my last show tried to convince me that if someone shoots an image of a completely dark room, I mean completely dark, like my color darkroom, that the resulting image should be considered a "photograph." He argured because the print would be all black, and since B&W is still around, that makes it a photograph.
    Is this guy wacko, or am I just being too traditional?
    DT
    You should have asked him, "if I punch your lights out, are you still awake or are you looking at a photograph in a black room".



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #23
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    I liked the idea so much I went into my dark room with my digital camera. No need to waste film (I waste enough on real pics). Once again, I find it's impossible to accomplish a perfectly simple picture with a digital camera. And don't give me any of that read the instruction book crap.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimgalli View Post
    I liked the idea so much I went into my dark room with my digital camera. No need to waste film (I waste enough on real pics). Once again, I find it's impossible to accomplish a perfectly simple picture with a digital camera. And don't give me any of that read the instruction book crap.
    Jim:

    The automatic flash went off again, didn't it?

    Matt

  5. #25
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeMitchell View Post
    You must be thinking of Hiroshi Sugimoto?? He's a LF black and white master. Though he's doing color work now.

    You make it sound gimmicky, but it's all gorgeous work.

    His seascapes are wonderful too.

    Link: http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/works/theaters/
    The "Conceptual" part of it is gimmicky because he could arrive at the same result if there was no film in the projector. But the result, on purely aesthetics ground is very beautiful. Which of course is the downfall of a conceptual approach.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by davetravis View Post
    But this one guy at my last show tried to convince me that if someone shoots an image of a completely dark room, I mean completely dark, like my color darkroom, that the resulting image should be considered a "photograph." He argured because the print would be all black, and since B&W is still around, that makes it a photograph.
    We should keep in mind that the translation of "photograph" is something like "drawing with light".

    So in the absence of light, no photograph can be taken.
    Last edited by Petzi; 10-09-2006 at 07:14 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeMitchell View Post
    You must be thinking of Hiroshi Sugimoto?? He's a LF black and white master. Though he's doing color work now.

    You make it sound gimmicky, but it's all gorgeous work.

    His seascapes are wonderful too.

    Link: http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/works/theaters/
    Whoa, that guy is in trouble. They are going to get him. He is committing a copyright violation. And he even posts it to the Internet.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    The "Conceptual" part of it is gimmicky because he could arrive at the same result if there was no film in the projector. But the result, on purely aesthetics ground is very beautiful. Which of course is the downfall of a conceptual approach.
    What is the gimmick?

  9. #29
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoPete View Post
    What is the gimmick?
    That he "recorded" an entire movie (or its idea) by letting the shutter open during the entire duration of said movie.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  10. #30
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    That he "recorded" an entire movie (or its idea) by letting the shutter open during the entire duration of said movie.
    I guess I don't see that as gimmicky. To me it is an interesting exploration of the nature of time as expressed in photography. Instead of the very thin slice of time normally captured in a photo, he gives us a full two hours and it changes entirely the focus of the picture- the part of the scene the audince would have focused on- the screen- is completely devoid of information, and what they might have hardly noticed- the architecture of the theatre- is rich with detail. It is the opposite end of the same spectrum as, say, sports photography, where the capture of a very brief period of time, rather than a long one, sets the focus for the image. I think that some of the images in your gallery are also part of an exploration of the relationship between time and the photographic medium, although yours also add elements of spatial location.

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