Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,192   Online: 700
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 60
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    227

    pleasing photographers, or pleasing the general public (viewers)



    I had spent a considerable amount of time working on the print second from the top left (picture of the guy in the boat with the black dog in front, dont have a full scan), and when the guy in the boat saw the print washing in the water, he said it was a really good photograph, which meant alot to me, becuase he usually doesn't say much if anything about my work. A family member saw the print and mentioned that they liked the "light coming off of him", which was my unperfect burning.

    I showed that shot to a photographer and he said that the burning and dodging is so obvious that he'd be embarressed to show that photo to a client. I know thats really easy to say in this era of Photoshop HDR and burning and dodging tools at a mouse click, but it still hit a chord with me. I know the burning is noticeable, but after a certain point I accepted that I wasn't going to use up another package of paper just to try and make the burning less obvious because i didn't think it detracted from the overall image, i accepted that its just an inherent part of an analog print that its tough to burn and make it seem like you didn't.

    i was really happy with the owner being happy with the photo, but since the other photographer made that comment, im wondering wether i should be fine tuning everything so that people that are experienced in photography and printmaking can't find faults with anything. i know theres always room for improvement but i think im taking the side of making my photos / prints for the general public (regular viewers and people that buy books or prints for example) rather than other photographers. what do you say?

  2. #2
    Dave Parker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,049
    Myself personally feel you have to be happy with it first, second would be the client, I don't normally pay to much heed to what another photographer says about my work, we are all at different levels and have a multitude of opinions about our craft. I can tell you this, I don't shoot to make other photographers happy..I shoot to make my client and myself happy.

    Dave

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    Quote Originally Posted by rjas View Post

    i know theres always room for improvement but i think im taking the side of making my photos / prints for the general public (regular viewers and people that buy books or prints for example) rather than other photographers.
    You are the one who was at the scene besides the person in the photograph and most importantly took the shot! I think what you should do is to try to convince yourself first: If you think if you're done with the picture, you're done with the picture, period.

    I often dislike overly dramatized photos by some photojournalists that have so much burining-in on their skys and they are dark as sh-t, but if they did the whole process from the shooting to the printing, and those photos are truly their visions, I have no problem.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    I mean, your prints in the photo above look very nice. So, don't worry.

  5. #5
    bjorke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SF & Surrounding Planet
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,032
    Images
    20
    Impressing someone is only important if you think it's important.

    What's the old line? No one can take away your self-respect without your permission?

    Most of the pictures I take, I take because I want that picture. Or I want to find out what that picture would be (a rephrasing, I think, of GW's "to see how a thing looks when photographed"). When you make a picture in that way, you give yourself permission to be the arbiter of its qualities.

    If you make a picture FOR someone (even for an unnamed future "the viewer"), well, be careful what you wish for. You've given up that much more control.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,312
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    434
    Perhaps you should use this as a moment to push yourself forward technically. There are other tools you can use to solve this problem, aside from the usual burning/dodging with a piece of cardboard. Though not easy to execute, unsharp masking will solve this problem for you in a straightforward fashion. Investigate this option if the burn/dodge issue is sufficiently bothersome that you want to make a "better" print of it.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    306
    Images
    26
    You need to satisfy yourself if you're working at creating Art. I find that usually satisfying the general public is creating to the lowest common denominator. That is not meant to be a jab at the public, its just an observation that the public is not as knowledgeable, or at least is not aware or discerning of finer work - technically or aesthetically.
    I have spent many years in the professional field, working as a photographer, producer, and designer. I once worked on a job for a multi media presentation, where all the text slides had defaulted to a Courier face. For anyone that doesn't know, this is the face that many systems will print if the actual fonts are not loaded. The actual face was supposed to be Copperplate. There is a HUGE difference in these two faces. When the Account Manager saw the slides, he didn't even notice. When I pointed it out to him, and explained that the job would have to be rerun, he said, "Why, the text is fine, I can read it." Swear to God.
    The point is that the creation and execution of your work should be more than Customer Service. Whether other people recognize the difference in a finer quality piece is not half as important as your recognition of the difference.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  8. #8
    jstraw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,703
    Images
    42
    The client comes first. My client is almost always me. When it's not, I do not come first.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    306
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    The client comes first. My client is almost always me. When it's not, I do not come first.
    If the client wants me to make Sh$%%$t. I'll ask him to find another photographer. Generally, you can still satisfy the customer without compromising the quality of the work. Educating him in the process is not such a bad idea either. In the end, people get what they pay for. And I am not cheap.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  10. #10
    jstraw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,703
    Images
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by don sigl View Post
    If the client wants me to make Sh$%%$t. I'll ask him to find another photographer. Generally, you can still satisfy the customer without compromising the quality of the work. Educating him in the process is not such a bad idea either. In the end, people get what they pay for. And I am not cheap.
    I agree with you completely.

    The client still comes first. Sometimes adjusting expectations is hard. Sometimes educating a client is hard. Sometimes turning down a client is hard. But once someone is a client...once you accept the job, the client comes first. That doesn't make the client god. It just means that satisfying my ego or winning a power struggle is secondary to meeting a customer's needs. If I can't, I've failed. I may have simply failed to turn down a job I shouldn't have accepted but I've failed, none the less.

    I don't confuse gallery owners, print buyers, teachers, critics, reception attendees or subjects...with clients, unless they *are* clients. I *always* come ahead of all those people.

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin