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  1. #1
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    My advice for aspiring photographers

    I recently shared this on a portraiture forum, so my apologies if it's a duplication for anyone reading. The two sites have very different audiences, so I wanted to share it here as well. Although it was written with portrait photographers in mind, most of it applies to all genres.

    ***********************************************

    These are my thoughts, nothing more and nothing less.

    I get asked all the time, during workshops, in e-mails, in private messages, what words of wisdom I would give to a new and aspiring photographer. Here's my answer.


    - Style is a voice, not a prop or an action. If you can buy it, borrow it, download it, or steal it, it is not a style. Don't look outward for your style; look inward.

    - Know your stuff. Luck is a nice thing, but a terrifying thing to rely on. It's like money; you only have it when you don't need it.

    - Never apologize for your own sense of beauty. Nobody can tell you what you should love. Do what you do brazenly and unapologetically. You cannot build your sense of aesthetics on a concensus.

    - Say no. Say it often. It may be difficult, but you owe it to yourself and your clients. Turn down jobs that don't fit you, say no to overbooking yourself. You are no good to anyone when you're stressed and anxious.

    - Learn to say "I'm a photographer" out loud with a straight face. If you can't say it and believe it, you can't expect anyone else to, either.

    - You cannot specialize in everything.

    - You don't have to go into business just because people tell you you should! And you don't have to be full time and making an executive income to be successful. If you decide you want to be in business, set your limits before you begin.

    - Know your style before you hang out your shingle. If you don't, your clients will dictate your style to you. That makes you nothing more than a picture taker. Changing your style later will force you to start all over again, and that's tough.

    - Accept critique, but don't apply it blindly. Just because someone said it does not make it so. Critiques are opinions, nothing more. Consider the advice, consider the perspective of the advice giver, consider your style and what you want to convey in your work. Implement only what makes sense to implement. That doesn't not make you ungrateful, it makes you independent.

    - Leave room for yourself to grow and evolve. It may seem like a good idea to call your business "Precious Chubby Tootsies"....but what happens when you decide you love to photograph seniors? Or boudoir?

    - Remember that if your work looks like everyone else's, there's no reason for a client to book you instead of someone else. Unless you're cheaper. And nobody wants to be known as "the cheaper photographer".

    - Gimmicks and merchandise will come and go, but honest photography is never outdated.

    - It's easier to focus on buying that next piece of equipment than it is to accept that you should be able to create great work with what you've got. Buying stuff is a convenient and expensive distraction. You need a decent camera, a decent lens, and a light meter. Until you can use those tools consistently and masterfully, don't spend another dime. Spend money on equipment ONLY when you've outgrown your current equipment and you're being limited by it. There are no magic bullets.

    - Learn that people photography is about people, not about photography. Great portraits are a side effect of a strong human connection.

    - Never forget why you started taking pictures in the first place. Excellent technique is a great tool, but a terrible end product. The best thing your technique can do is not call attention to itself. Never let your technique upstage your subject.

    - Never compare your journey with someone else's. It's a marathon with no finish line. Someone else may start out faster than you, may seem to progress more quickly than you, but every runner has his own pace. Your journey is your journey, not a competition. You will never "arrive". No one ever does.

    - Embrace frustration. It pushes you to learn and grow, broadens your horizons, and lights a fire under you when your work has gone cold. Nothing is more dangerous to an artist than complacence.


    - CJ

  2. #2
    JJC
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    That says alot.
    "Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Jim Horning

  3. #3
    eddym's Avatar
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    This is good advice not only for aspiring photographers, but for those of us who already are one. I'm going to print this, if you don't mind, and hang it where I can see it often.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  4. #4
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Hi Cheryl,

    Print that puppy into posters!

    Ever think about fleshing each of those paragraphs out, and making it into a series of articles for a magazine? Wisdom is earned...there has to be some good stories in there

    Murray
    _________________________________________
    Note to self: Turn your negatives into positives.

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Thanks Cheryl - a very valuable read.

    I especially like "Embrace frustration" - trust me, it has applicability to my day job (lawyering) as well .

    Matt

    P.S. - come to think of it - if you ever need another name for a band, "embrace Frustration" might work there too.

  6. #6

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    Thanks Cheryl. A good read for sure. Pretty much applies to life in general.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  7. #7
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Most excellent Cheryl. Better advice than Adams or Weston ever wrote.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  8. #8
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Wonderful Cheryl.
    This is going into my ipod.
    Marko Kovacevic
    Blog
    Youtube

  9. #9
    winger's Avatar
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    Great advice - I hope you don't mind if I also print it to re-read frequently.

  10. #10
    BWGirl's Avatar
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    Cheryl, thanks so much for this. I agree with everyone else that this would make a great poster.
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

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