Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,219   Posts: 1,532,245   Online: 812
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,132
    Images
    289

    Numbering Objects in Titles

    I've been thinking about this lately... I'm sure we've all seen the "12 Posts" or "7 Rocks" pictures out there. They are in no short supply. At first I dismissed this as cheese, though the photographs are often anything but... On second thought I must admit to counting those objects when numbered, it's almost impossible for me not to.

    Now I'm wondering, does this take away from the image by changing the focus to specific objects within the photograph, when generally, the photographs with these names are minimalistic and more about the organization of tone and form? OR Does it simply stop the passerby/non-artist/layman and offer them another way into the sometimes esoteric world of fine art photography? After all, if you're counting objects then you're engrossed in the photograph in at least one way, and it may lead to other discoveries...

    I haven't really formed an opinion and am curious what others think.
    Last edited by Shawn Dougherty; 01-24-2007 at 01:47 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Spelling

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Dougherty View Post
    I've been thinking about this lately... I'm sure we've all seen the "12 Posts" or "7 Rocks" pictures out there. They are in no short supply. At first I dismissed this as cheese, though the photographs are often anything but... On second thought I must admit to counting those objects when numbered, it's almost impossible for me not to.

    Now I'm wondering, does this take away from the image by changing the focus to specific objects within the photograph, when generally, the photographs with these name are minimalistic and more about the organization of tone and form? OR Does it simply stop the passerby/non-artist/layman and offer them another way into the sometimes esoteric world of fine art photography? After all, if your counting objects you're engrossed in the photograph in at least one way, and it may lead to other discoveries...

    I haven't really formed an opinion and am curious what others think.
    Dear Shawn,

    I think you're probably right. Fascinating idea!

    Cheers,

    R.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    53
    I don't like 'em.

    I think titles are something to put thought into, not just objectify whats obvious. I can count the damn posts if I want to, but wheres the emotion in that?

    Good titles can change a good photograph into a great experience, and transport the viewer into timelessness.

    Josh

  4. #4
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Once upon a time, there was an entry in the Eurovision Song Contest called "99 Luftballons". I tend to place anything with that kind of title in that same category. I may miss out on some great pictures (and songs) that way, but at least I'm spared a lot of drivel!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,240
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    Once upon a time, there was an entry in the Eurovision Song Contest called "99 Luftballons". I tend to place anything with that kind of title in that same category. I may miss out on some great pictures (and songs) that way, but at least I'm spared a lot of drivel!
    Sorry to disagree Ole, but I remember that song too - it was very popular over here, in both English and German versions. I enjoyed the German version best, but that may be due to the fact that I basically don't understand any German .

    Come to think of it though, it might have something to do with the Video of the song, and the lead singer, and the fact that I was single at the time ...... no, that couldn't be it, could it?

    Matt

  6. #6
    reellis67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,887
    Images
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by joshverd View Post
    I don't like 'em.

    I think titles are something to put thought into, not just objectify whats obvious. I can count the damn posts if I want to, but wheres the emotion in that?

    Good titles can change a good photograph into a great experience, and transport the viewer into timelessness.

    Josh
    I agree with your assessment. A title, or the lack of one, can fundamentally change the way a photograph is viewed. Sometimes when I am looking at photographs I try to not read the titles on the first pass and then go around again reading the titles to see how it changes my perceptions. I'm usually surprised at least once in any given exhibition on that second pass.

    - Randy

  7. #7
    eddym's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,927
    Images
    26
    I don't know... Did anybody really listen to Paul Simon sing "50 ways to leave your lover" and try to count them?
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  8. #8
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,631
    Images
    40
    If I use a title like "Three Snags" it is because it makes it easier to tell it (from the title only) from a photograph called "Two Snags" . No big deal.

    Since my titles are not on the front of the mat, the title does not influence the viewer, so again no big deal.

    If the photo is in a show and there is a lable with the title below the print, typically, the viewer sees the image first from a distance, perhaps moves in for closer lok, then looks at the lable with the title. The first impression is already made before knowing the title, so yet again, no big deal.

    Hopefully, finding out the title adds to the impression that the viewer already has of the photograph. If the viewer has a bias against certain types of titles, that's his/her problem...no big deal.

    Vaughn

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    53
    How about taking the time to make a thoughtful title?...no big deal.

  10. #10
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,631
    Images
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by joshverd View Post
    How about taking the time to make a thoughtful title?...no big deal.
    If a thoughtful title adds to the work, great. My usual subject is the light on the landscape. "Thoughtful" titles would be rather contrived artifacts for much of my work.

    You seem to be saying I should create special unique titles for every photograph. Not something I agree with. I photographic under the Redwoods a lot, quite a bit over the last 25 years...I can only use such titles as "Monarch of the Forest" , "Fallen Warriors" and "Ancient Giants" so many times!

    As I wrote in another post somewhere... a title can add to a photograph as hand gestures add to a conversation.

    "Good titles can change a good photograph into a great experience, and transport the viewer into timelessness."

    I agree, but a thoughtful title is not always needed to do the same thing...sometimes the image is enough. And sometimes a thoughtful title can limit the viewer's experience...to channel the viewer's experience into the narrow confines of the phtographer's thought.

    Just think how sad it would be if the artist of the Mona Lisa had included a title that expressed why she was smiling! All the wonder of that smile would be gone.

    Vaughn

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin