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  1. #41
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke View Post
    Few people think it strange that the music that was popular in 1937 is not what is popular now. Likewise the movies and the hairstyle or the (lack of) hats.
    Absolutely. Whilst the music of the 1930's/1940's was popular in its time (obviously), it is now still enjoyed and played but only by a small minority (of strange, eccentric people like me!).

    As for hats....


    Steve.

  2. #42
    jstraw's Avatar
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    Ah, the incomplete overlap of art and popular culture! Art is timeless...pop culture is fashion. Any work of art may or may not have anything to do with popular culture at any given time. Steinbeck once sold better than he sells now but he still sells. Tab Hunter...not so much.
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. In velit arcu, consequat at, interdum sit amet, consequat in, quam.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    You might find this to be hard to believe, but if you look at the historical record. there are no true color images prior to the development of Kodachrome.

    With the development of Kodachrome - people suddenly realized that there was really color in the world - we know this because it could now be documented on film!
    Actually, Europe (France, in particular) was in color before the US. Auguste and Louis Lumiére patented Autochrome in 1906. Unfortunately, color spoiled somewhat during shipping it across the Atlantic ocean, so it didn't come into vogue until better processes were available.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post

    You might find this to be hard to believe, but if you look at the historical record. there are no true color images prior to the development of Kodachrome.
    I hope you are not being literal with this comment? If so, you are quite wrong because there were some beautiful true color three-color carbon prints made as early at the first decade of the 20th century.

    Sandy King

  5. #45
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking View Post
    I hope you are not being literal with this comment? If so, you are quite wrong because there were some beautiful true color three-color carbon prints made as early at the first decade of the 20th century.

    Sandy King
    For an example- the works of Russian photographer Sergei Prokhudin-Gorskii -

    http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/empire/ethnic.html

    These were taken between 1907 and 1915

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