Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,900   Posts: 1,584,390   Online: 663
      
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 52
  1. #41

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    Well Mr. Mcblane we are esserntially in agreement except the part about the very large print. The rendition of the scene provided by the larger negative photographed so that it produced a much larger image upon the negative certainly should have and may well actually have better clarity and should almost certainly have better gradation. However, If I were to be using my Dust S45 and a 35mm negative with an appropriate lens then I would without a douibt be able to project an image from which one could make a very large print..the enlarger allows tilting the head by 90º. The baseboard itself can hold an easel to use 30X40 paper.

    I tend to highly appreciate the capabilities of larger formats than 35mm. I have just decided to use a different set of tools. Actually, in some cases the 35mm camera and lens could result in more effort being used.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  2. #42
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    I have just decided to use a different set of tools. Actually, in some cases the 35mm camera and lens could result in more effort being used.
    The fact that you've decided to use whatever tools that you want is all fine, but the "perfect" tool is what was discussed. I could use a hand saw to build a house and it would work just fine, but a "power saw" would probably be the "perfect" tool.

    The fact that you work very hard with a 35mm still does not make it the perfect tool to end up with 30x40 even though you put a great deal of effort into it.

    The "perfect tool" would probably best be described as the one that allowed you to work the "smartest" not the hardest.




    MIchael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    May I opine that the perfect tool is but a compromise?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  4. #44
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    One intersting thing is I remember about reading an interview with John Szarkowski (sp?) about Gary Winnogard's work is how Winnogard's contact sheets would usually have 23 misses and one hit or keeper. I don't think that is a dillution of any effort, just how a street shooter works.

    Funny you should mention that, because in the May issue of Art in America there is an interview with Szarkowski, and apropos Winogrand he says: "Winogrand certainly did expose a great deal of film, and until his very last years he had an astonishing percentage of successes even by his own high standards. The proof sheet containing the famous picture of the crippled beggar at the American Legion Convetion includes three or four other pictures--never printed by Winogrand--that most photographers would count among their prizes."

    We may never know whether great photographers are just great editors or intrinsically gifted. We only know that they published great photos, regardless of what it took them to get there.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  5. #45
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    May I opine that the perfect tool is but a compromise?
    Life is full of compromises.

    One could argue that 2 1/4 is a "compromise" tool entirely.

    But the argument was about the perfect tool for the job. And granted perfection is rarely attained, but then we still must try to get as close as possible to the perfect tool or else our compromises will reach such a level as to make them useless.

    Large format at a fast moving sporting event, or a scenic 35mm-30x40 print sitting beside a 8x10-30x40 print.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    Would it be fair to say that the perfect tool is largely difined by the desires of the end user's goal.

    Say that you had an older person, me. Say that while he was still employed he realized that while he could at that time afford a good sized expenditure in equipment but that he realized in the near future he would become, as has now happened, retired and be able to spend less on his photography. This person has thought carefully about what he wants as an end result..6 1/2x9 3/4 inch prints on 11x14 mat board. Some prints being trimmed to a different aspect ratio due to the way he interepreted the subject at the photo's taking.

    Would you conclude that he should have chosen 8x10 over 35mm?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #47
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Would it be fair to say that the perfect tool is largely difined by the desires of the end user's goal.
    I would suggest that in almost all cases this is the definition. And in your scenario I would suggest that 8x10 is overkill. Perhaps even 4x5 is overkill unless movements are needed.

    If that scenario were my choice, I would use 2 1/4. On the other hand if financial constraints, physical constraints, etc were the order of the day, the "perfect tool" would then be the "tool" that he has.

    But, in my opinion, given the choice, 35mm would, and almost never is the choice. (sporting events, trekking up Mt Everest etc being the exception)


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    Underwater photography with a variety of focal lengths? Copy stand work? Scanning macro photography. Slides taken for audio-visual work? Court room reportage? Available light photography?
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  9. #49
    blansky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Wine country in Northern California
    Posts
    5,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Underwater photography with a variety of focal lengths? Copy stand work? Scanning macro photography. Slides taken for audio-visual work? Court room reportage? Available light photography?
    I never do that stuff, so it does not apply to me.

    Available light in 6x6 works just fine.

    I did say "in my opinion". But if 35mm works for you, then its your perfect tool.



    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    Well we have both found our own best choice. Even though the choices are different I somehow feel this is a memorial day..or is it a Memorial Day?

    Mr McBlane appreciated is your taking the time to amuse an old man. Thank you Michael.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin