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  1. #21

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    Two more examples of going to the same place twice and having different reactions to tripods: the Kremlin of Moscow (two visits days apart) and Old Goa (two visits years apart). Old Goa wouldn't even allow monopods but they didn't mind when we rested our cameras on museum display cases, tombs or walls...

    Cheers,

    R.

  2. #22
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    My experience is the enforcement of 'laws' - real or otherwise - has been completely random. I go to places with the assumption anything public can be photographed. I always seek if I need a permit ahead of time and usually get it.

    I've photographed public places without incident where others have been stopped or questioned and vice versa. Sometimes I've gone back to places where I have stopped and had no hassles what so ever.

    Do I think about the 'laws' when I photograph? Not really.

    I agree that posting specifics - perceived or real - of specifc places is kind of nice to know. What disturbs me is the 'photography is my right, so I'm going to photograph it, no matter what' attitude. I can't remember where I was but I remember this guy with a 4x5 arguing with a monk in Thailand why he had the 'right' to photograph a temple. He probably did, but he was wrong anyway - know what I mean?

    Regards, Art.
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  3. #23

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    Often, a useful response is the 'sturdy answer' praised by the late Master of the Rolls, Lord Denning: "Who says I can't?"

    In the absence of a satisfactory answer -- which can include, as Art suggests, common decency -- the answer is that you can...

    Alas, this attitude has all but vanished from today's Britain -- as has the legal support offered by the likes of Lord Denning.

    Cheers,

    R.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    That sounds like Scottish French!

    Steve.
    Nope its danish and means
    "you'll get a better pic after nightfall when the lights are on"

    Cheers
    Søren
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  5. #25
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    PhotoPermit

    International law links can be found in the "Links" and tips for travellers in the Forums.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  6. #26

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    I have never been harassed by authorities when photographing here in DK not even at night, well once the cops did look a little distrustful. they didn't stop to ask though
    Civilians and drunk people are another league. Once I had to abandon a shot because of a drunk getting a bit aggressive.
    Cheers
    Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  7. #27

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    Here in New Mexico there are many places you cannot take photos. Others require a fee be paid. Indian reservations come to mind. The one close to my house requires a fee be paid to the Govenor's office. The fee varies depending on who you are and what you want to do. They do not allow any photos of the church, plaza, or their dances. They have a heard of buffalo though, that you may photograph without a permit or fee. The next pueblo up the road prohibits all photography, as does the next one. There is one west of here that charges a daily fee but allows no tripods. My only advice on indian land is to call the Governor's office before you go. These reservations have lots of cops nowadays, thanks to casino money. Having the permit in hand will avoid lots of trouble. Someday I shall try to make a list of all the tribes in the state and their photo laws. You have to be very respectful of them or they get offended.

    Other than that, the usual restrictions apply, like no photos in shopping malls, stores, etc. The federal courthouse downtown has a bunch of goons who harass people on the sidewalk. Over by the base they get upset about taking photos near the fence. There are no Albuquerque city ordinances banning photography. The cops there sometimes harass people, just for fun I think. There may be restrictions in Los Alamos County, but I don't go up there so am not sure. They have installed inspection stations up there (like the border) and it is hurting their tourism. Santa Fe has some sort of commercial permit but I don't know how it's enforced.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Another photographer friend of mine, Garrie Maguire from Australia, was doing essentially the same thing, minus the scanning back. The authorities finally caught up to him after about four days of shooting and put the kibbosh on his plans.
    Hi I am he, (Garrie), the full story was i shot at Angkor in Dec 99 on 5x4 without trouble. in 2002 i got back to the park, much had changed with the administration by then. I attempted to get a press pass via the Apsara Authourity, who are in charge of the keeping of the park, but go no replys to my emails. I arrived at the park with the camera, got a couple of shots away in the park before the sercurity guys got me. I spent the rest of my week arranging to get a pass, for the 5x4 (it was approved at 9pm less then 24 hours before i was to leave. I feel it is fair that a poor country looks after its assests. I believe that we as photographers should give back to the administration of the park if we are going to make money out of their assets. Their issue is that they should receive a fee for professional imagry shot at the park, i agree with them, the days of colonisation are over. Their web is http://www.autoriteapsara.org/ they are great people, they can be beauracratic, but... they get paid poorly, and have a great responciblity.

    also if you don't want your film to be put through xray, get the bus to Bangkok, it is not negotaionable at Cambodia's airports.

    enjoy its my favourate place on the planet.

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