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  1. #21
    highpeak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck1 View Post
    I thought this was a pretty neat article.

    I think it proves that well known statement that "beauty is in the eye (or ear) of the beholder".

    CP
    Well said , Chuck.

    David, very interesting article to read. It's takes a lot for people to stop and listen on the rush hour. Even people with good taste of music, they just simply pre-occupied in their daily routine.

    Alex W.

  2. #22
    DBP
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    I would agree that the experiment would have been more revealing at the evening rush hour, where fewer people are constrained by having to be somewhere at a precise time. I also wonder how many people noticed the music, during the minute or so they were in earshot, but dodged the reporter. As for the lottery ticket buyers, are we really surprised that people who think buying a lottery ticket matters don't appreciate beauty?

    But the title of this thread raises a further question, if we believe Keats. If "beauty is truth, truth beauty", and beauty is irrelevant, doesn't it naturally follow that truth is irrelevant? And do we finally have an answer for Pilate, in time for Easter?

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    But the title of this thread raises a further question, if we believe Keats. If "beauty is truth, truth beauty", and beauty is irrelevant, doesn't it naturally follow that truth is irrelevant? And do we finally have an answer for Pilate, in time for Easter?
    Dear DBP,

    What is Easter?

    (with apologies to Pontius, P.)

    Cheers,

    R.

  4. #24
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks View Post
    Dear DBP,

    What is Easter?

    (with apologies to Pontius, P.)

    Cheers,

    R.
    My first conversation of the day was started by an overly religious friend greeting me by phone with "the Lord has risen". I hadn't.

  5. #25
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    Americans know nothing of the arts -- it is the first thing to be cut from education and the last class to be added as an elective. Had my father not been an artist, I fear I would have passed the violinist, too.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  6. #26
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    I don't know if it's too surprising - I don't think it has ANYTHING to do with talent - so much as what I'd call 'receptivity'. People expect certain phenomena (concert violin virtuosos notwithstanding) to occur in certain settings. No big surprise there! They see buskers as failed musicians who want money from them and are therefore not allowing themselves to hear beauty in the music - because it's not something they're expecting. Likewise - you could take a second rate musician, put them in Carnegie hall, hype them - and receive SOME acclaim. How on earth do you think Britney Spears made her millions.

  7. #27
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    I think you're kind of proving your own dictum. Because you don't expect to see what you think of as 'great art' or 'great photography' to occur in a lightbox - you aren't allowing for the possibility. It's all about the context, right?


    Quote Originally Posted by Pinholemaster View Post
    David

    Thanks for the link. Makes me wonder what would happen if some of the leading modern photographers, whose images grace museums now, had to hang their work in subway stops instead.

    I can imagine a Jeff Wall lightbox in an airport concourse next to all the other lightboxes advertising vacations, cell phones, and computers. NO ONE would notice.

    Not that I think Jeff Wall's work can move people the way Joshua Bell can.

  8. #28
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    I have believed for some time that taste is something that people need to be told to have. If someone is a great musician/photographer who really will notice? I think that most people will need to be told how great something is before they can recognize it. This is also the reason why some works which are promoted as great art are successful even when they are not great art. I could go on and on about this, just from the things I have seen in my life, but I'll leave it at that.

    Great story and beautiful music.

    Patrick

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickjames View Post
    This is also the reason why some works which are promoted as great art are successful even when they are not great art.
    I am often bewildered by the 'art' that is declared by those who display and sell it to be 'great', or at least, significant. I don't always think so. I've decided that the real reason such work attains that stature is that it's lineage is recognizable to those who assimilate such stuff, and those folks understand its genesis from the influences of its progenitors. Because it fulfills their expectations of what should/ought to evolve as a next step, they feel vindicated in their taste. VERY human, I suppose, but mysterious to me.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  10. #30
    Sparky's Avatar
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    Well, Jovo - you can't please everyone all of the time, right?? Thank GOD we don't all like color photos of sunsets! An example of what you're talking about might be an edward weston photo that is an absolute piece of garbage - which I'M SURE he's done - but that fetches a price in the thousands or tens of thousands because of the name. But then again - it IS valuable in terms of it's art-historical lineage - perhaps to a gallery or to a museum because it's a 'broken link'... because it shows how his work changed from 'this' to 'that'. There are many factors out there. Taste is as flexible as the human mind - which is what makes it so rich, varied and contentious at times.

    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    I am often bewildered by the 'art' that is declared by those who display and sell it to be 'great', or at least, significant. I don't always think so. I've decided that the real reason such work attains that stature is that it's lineage is recognizable to those who assimilate such stuff, and those folks understand its genesis from the influences of its progenitors. Because it fulfills their expectations of what should/ought to evolve as a next step, they feel vindicated in their taste. VERY human, I suppose, but mysterious to me.

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