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  1. #1
    tjaded's Avatar
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    Interesting off-hand comment

    Hi all--
    Something happened to me a few weeks ago that really stuck in the back of my mind and I thought I would share it in case anyone cares! Basically, I bought some film from a local photographer. When I bought it I mentioned the photo lab that I work in. She said that she used to go there all the time, but having gone mostly digital she rarely gets to the lab now. What she said next is what really stuck with me. She said that she really missed the social aspect of going to the lab--it was a place to see/talk to other photographers. I've been trying to think what it is that struck such a chord with me and I think it is this: One of the things about photography (or any other specialized hobby or profession) is the kinship you get with others that are into similar things. I remember when I was a full time photo student the sense of almost relief when I went to a lab or photo supply store and could talk about photography without getting that "deer in the headlights" look that I found with most people. With the whole digital photography thing, it has the potential to get kind of lonely. Going to the lab to pickup/drop off film is obviously gone for those that switched. I have seen quite a few photographers come into the lab to drop off a roll or two and often run into someone they haven't seen in years. The conversation always seems to involve one having "gone digital" and only through the dropping off a roll of person work are old aquaintences reunited. This isn't a digital bashing post, just happened to feature prominantly in my story, btw. Anyway--I found it an interesting off-hand comment and thought maybe some others here might find it of interest (if not, that's cool....I tend to get hung up on weird stuff. I drive an Edsel after all....)

    Adios,
    Matt


    P.S. If you live in San Francisco and go to Newlab, say hello to this fellow APUGer behind the counter!
    --------------------
    "Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it." -Paul Strand

    www.glasskeyphoto.com

  2. #2
    Curt's Avatar
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    That is true, the last time I was in the local camera shop they seemed short and didn't want to talk, until I mentioned I was looking for a filter for my Nikon F3. At that point they said they, the two men, were sorry they thought that I was another digital drop off. Someone who just comes in to drop off a disk or memory card I guess. They went all out and wanted to talk about their cameras and one even had an F3 like mine. The whole social thing was back the way it used to be. I wanted to stay and talk for hours but had to go. I hadn't thought of it until I saw this thread. If I lived in say New York I would drive them nuts at B&H like I did when I went to school in California and went to Freestyle. Thanks for the thought!
    Curt

    That could be a great line: "Digital Drop Off" or maybe "Digital Drop Out"
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  3. #3
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjaded View Post
    Hi all--
    Something happened to me a few weeks ago that really stuck in the back of my mind and I thought I would share it in case anyone cares! Basically, I bought some film from a local photographer. When I bought it I mentioned the photo lab that I work in. She said that she used to go there all the time, but having gone mostly digital she rarely gets to the lab now. What she said next is what really stuck with me. She said that she really missed the social aspect of going to the lab--it was a place to see/talk to other photographers. I've been trying to think what it is that struck such a chord with me and I think it is this: One of the things about photography (or any other specialized hobby or profession) is the kinship you get with others that are into similar things. I remember when I was a full time photo student the sense of almost relief when I went to a lab or photo supply store and could talk about photography without getting that "deer in the headlights" look that I found with most people. With the whole digital photography thing, it has the potential to get kind of lonely. Going to the lab to pickup/drop off film is obviously gone for those that switched. I have seen quite a few photographers come into the lab to drop off a roll or two and often run into someone they haven't seen in years. The conversation always seems to involve one having "gone digital" and only through the dropping off a roll of person work are old aquaintences reunited. This isn't a digital bashing post, just happened to feature prominantly in my story, btw. Anyway--I found it an interesting off-hand comment and thought maybe some others here might find it of interest (if not, that's cool....I tend to get hung up on weird stuff. I drive an Edsel after all....)

    Adios,
    Matt


    P.S. If you live in San Francisco and go to Newlab, say hello to this fellow APUGer behind the counter!
    Isn't what you're seeking is what APUG is?

  4. #4
    Curt's Avatar
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    Isn't what you're seeking is what APUG is?
    __________________
    Seeking yes, filling a void yes, but a computer screen and a keyboard is not a face and a hand shake. Although it is not to be dismissed as nothing; is it better to write a letter or drop a note than to sit in a room and wonder what is going on?
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  5. #5
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Seeking yes, filling a void yes, but a computer screen and a keyboard is not a face and a hand shake. Although it is not to be dismissed as nothing; is it better to write a letter or drop a note than to sit in a room and wonder what is going on?
    You would be amazed how much fun it is to meet people here in person.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #6

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    Yesterday I went to the Photopusher that stocks the F-mount Zeisslenses to borrow one for an hours testshooting. When I asked if they needed some kind of ID or a signature the ansver was "nah I know you" :o :rolleyes: Just realized Im going there to often, spending too much money
    Kind regards
    Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  7. #7
    roteague's Avatar
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    I like going into the local Ritz camera store and asking if they have any cameras. Actually, they do: 1 Canon EOS and a 6x6 Segull. The manager is an old buddy of mine, and a LF photographer.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #8
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    The social aspect:

    I am a bit spoiled -- I run the teaching darkroom at a university. In fact, I am washing 8x10 negs at the darkroom right now (standing water). Its 11:30 pm, so it is a bit quiet now.

    Having students come into my office with wet prints sure beats clicking on the Critique Gallery! (I just ask them to rinse the fixer off first!)

    Vaughn

  9. #9

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    g'day Matt
    an interesting observation, the change to digital does seem to lead to less human interactions

    but i think it's just another example of the loss of communication skills and opportunity for human intertaction that is becoming the norm in our technology driven society

  10. #10
    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    I just dropped off some 220 format E-6 at a color lab near Boston, and the woman behind the counter was telling me that "in the day" all the wedding photographers in the area would drop off film, run into each other there. Talk shop. Now they are down to 2 1/2 lab technicians from 25, and those wedding photographers who occasional drop off film complain that they miss those professional friendships.

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