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  1. #11
    jstraw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan McIntosh View Post
    While on the topic of highest selling artwork, here is the record for the highest selling photography from a living photographer. This was just a few months ago.

    Andreas Gursky 99 Cent II Diptychon, $3,346,456, February, 2007

    http://incident.net/users/gregory/wo...99cent_pop.jpg
    Was that a Buy It Now price?
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  2. #12

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    The whole story is hilariously ironic. I'm not even remotely an art historian, but I think this kind of stuff was part of the art movement that was reactionary against the bourgeois intellectual art critics, in a similar vein to the dadaists or whatever, and here's this really amusing story of art authenticity in which these $120million collectors are debating the style of the splatters, and the nature of the drip-strokes, and all that total horseshit! Jackson Pollock would probably be laughing his fool head off at all this!

    I hope the woman gets her money. I think I would have taken the $2M offer and run, but with all this controversy if it is eventually accredited by the art community it'll probably be worth a hell of a lot more than that.

    You'd think the fingerprint match would be enough to at least get some big offers on speculation (I guess maybe that $2M one falls into that category).
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
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  3. #13
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    I'm for anything that drives the average price of art per square foot, upward.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    Was that a Buy It Now price?
    LOL! That was rich.

    Regards, Art (Pun intended)
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

  5. #15
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    Markets correct themselves. Who cares if certain folks remain unconvinced of the value of the maybe-Pollock painting, what matters is that some people are convinced that it MIGHT be of value and therefore worth their $$ to spend as a speculative investment. The "art community" decried here is no more effective than any other politburo, given the liquid nature of any real market.

    Then again, I can't help but feel that this is perhaps a sham story, inventing and declaring some hidden star chamber of art experts (most likely all public-NEA-fund-skimming Democrats who think Andres Serrrano is their God) that just want to keep Nice Reglur Folks down & stuck in their trailer parks while those Liberal Elite Art Community types are sipping champagne in on Fifth Avenue.

    As for the acceptance of science (even, sometimes bordering on junk science, like the fractal-patterning math that's been associated with Pollock analysis), in the REAL art-sales community science is an accepted part of the market. Not an issue of ARTNEWS (or even, say, MODERN PAINTERS) seems to go by without there being at least one or two stories about scientific dating, technological art production, and various sorts of high-tech sleuthing.

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  6. #16

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    When considering the aesthertics of this (or any) Pollock painting, remember that his style evolved over a great number of paintings, many were thrown out as failures, and this could have been an early or experimental piece. It doesn't look like a "mature" or "successful" Pollock to me, though I'm hardly an expert. But the fingerprint is pretty compelling...

    Regarding the snobbery of the art world, that's largely confined to the "collectors and connoisseurs", who owe the lady nothing and have as much right as anyone to be snobbish and elitist.

  7. #17
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    It looked like a Pollack to me. It had all the energy (anger?) and the look of many of the major lines sure as hell looked Pollack like. I agree with mark in that it didn't show some of the restraint (if the word can be used to describe a Pollack painting) of his later and more popular work. The art experts used to represent the art elite may not have been truly representative and the whole thing may be a bit of a scam -- from the truck driving flea market shopping owner through to the 60 min presentation.
    Last edited by jd callow; 05-07-2007 at 02:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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  8. #18
    AgX
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    [QUOTE=Ryan McIntosh;465038]And AGX, clearly you are not familar with the art market. $50 million for an important painting from one of the most famous painter is history is just a low estimate. I'm sure if they prove this to be a real Pollock painting, it will sell closer to $100 million.[/QUOTE

    Well, I am related to the `art world´ for many, many years. But you are right I still do not see through the mechanics of the art market. But still I do not find any painting worth of 50 million. But as indicated I consider the art market, hence market, as a place of offer and demand. So if anyone wants to pay such a sum, whatever his motivation would be, he is free to do. That's the way our society works.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post

    Well, I am related to the `art world´ for many, many years. But you are right I still do not see through the mechanics of the art market. But still I do not find any painting worth of 50 million. But as indicated I consider the art market, hence market, as a place of offer and demand. So if anyone wants to pay such a sum, whatever his motivation would be, he is free to do. That's the way our society works.
    I am not related to the "art world" but I am confused by your use of the term "worth".

    I work in the financial markets - the "worth" of anything, tangible or intangible, is simply what a willing and able buyer offers to a willing and able seller who, in turn, accepts the offer. So if a willing and able buyer offers $50MM or $100MM for a Pollock painting and a willing and able sellers accepts and agrees to sell it for such - then the painting is "worth" the price.

    It is nothing more than that. Obviously, "worth" can (and does) fluctuate depending on market conditions, relative supply and demand etc.

    I think what's fascinating about the 60 Minutes story (which I did not see) is that it feeds into the frenzy of an everyday kind of person "hitting it big" by combing flea markets, tag sales etc. This frenzy, fed by TV productions such as "The Antiques Road Show" etc. makes us all dream a little that behind the boring mundane picture we just bought we will find the last, long lost original of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, or the Magna Carta, or the true Shroud of Turin etc.

  10. #20
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    agreed, george. I find watching the antiques roadshow as depressing as it is interesting, though. SOME people seem to have genuine interest in the objects they present - though it seems MANY just want to try to cash in ... and their esteem for said objects jumps wildly if it's actually worth something...

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