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  1. #1
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Is APUG actually about physicality?


    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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  2. #2

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    It is a community and therefore a product of the photographers taking part. Whatever than means. In essence it is I think. It is in part about producing photographs that 'are' in their own right, without the sterile barren perfection of d******. The culture we have here I think is largely about the art, print and photographer being indivisible....if I am making sense. The Analogue Trinity!

  3. #3

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    "its all about the ‘critical discourse’ surrounding issues of representation and how the work relates to Rosalind Krauss’s ’sculpture in the expanded field’ essay. or so i’ve heard." Oh, that sounds so impressive...but what did he say????

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew B. View Post
    "its all about the ‘critical discourse’ surrounding issues of representation and how the work relates to Rosalind Krauss’s ’sculpture in the expanded field’ essay. or so i’ve heard." Oh, that sounds so impressive...but what did he say????

    I can't translate that but I can translate what you just said. You said:

    "I haven't any idea what's in Rosalind Krauss' essay and I'm not going to read it in order to find out if the statement would be perfectly clear to me if I did. I'm just going to ridicule the artsy-fartsy talk because that's easier."
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  5. #5

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    Oh thanks for that, that was funny. The fellow who buries his photographs... to cure them? Of what, though, I wonder. Reminds me of an acquaintance of mine back in Canada who used to grow high-grade marijuana. When his crop was harvested and cured, he'd bury it over the winter in his back yard. Said it did wonders for the aroma and taste!

  6. #6
    jstraw's Avatar
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    My latest, new policy: Ignore art-bashing posts in art threads since the art-bashers won't ignore art threads.
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  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    My latest, new policy: Ignore art-bashing posts in art threads since the art-bashers won't ignore art threads.
    *2

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
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    I think this is an important and valid point to be mentioned in contemporary photography and art in general. I do think some of people here are consciously or unconsciously dealing with this issue of physicality.

    I think there are two fundamentally different issues at stake.

    One is the issue of sterile-ness in contemporary images which, I think, has a lot to do with having an ultimate control over image-making as one person pointed out in the comments. It has to do with photographers' self-consciousness and not "letting other things happen." I cannot quite articulate it, but photographs used to carry more poignant feeling because it was more spontaneous and transient. If you remember what Fredrick Sommer said in an interview on a radio, you know what I mean. It lacks depth because it can only go as far as a photographer can consciously think of.

    We see these images regardless of digital or analogue. Certainly staying or going back to analogue does not guarantee otherwise at all.

    The other issue is about physical properties of photographs- photographs as objects. I think more and more we are exposed to images without physical forms whether it is on a computer screen or TV crossing different media without any respect to the inherent properties. I think people are feeling a little empty or at least nostalgic about the way we used to interact with images. I mean what is the point of having a self-rotating LCD picture frame? We are giving up a quite lot for these things, which you will only appreciate when they are completely gone.

    For this using analogue will certainly help and develop a sense of tactility and physicality in things around us which we are replacing with mechanical, chemicals, as well as electrical experiences.

    I think, though, ultimately a good photograph is supported by good form.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi
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  9. #9
    jstraw's Avatar
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    There is a definite striving for physicality on APUG. Witness the postcard and print exchanges. One of my favorite things about the postcard exchange beyond the pure substance of a concrete object in my hands is the realities of the object. Which side is "up?" What's on the back? What happened to the photograph in transit? Where did it travel from?

    If the image itself was all that mattered we'd be satisfied with the galleries.

    We are not.
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  10. #10
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Much as I am averse to theoretical discussions of the "angels and pinhead" variety, there seem to be 2 questions here:

    1) APUG and physicality. The main strength of an electronic bulletin board is that it provides a platform for ideas, whether verbal or as images, for anyone who wants to join in from all over the world. This does not exclude any physicality in the form of exchanges of actual prints etc. but this activity must surely come (and does come, in my view) a very distant second. If your main interest is in physically handling images, you need to find, for example, postal portfolios running in your own country.

    2) Bjorke posts a link to a photographer bewailing the sterility of his [digital] work. Call me an old curmudgeon, but if a photographer is producing what he/she feels are "sterile" images, the most likely reason by far is the emotional emptiness of the said photographer's mind. To blame the sterility on the characteristics of the technical process being used seems grossly mistaken. Paper manufacturers have toiled day and night without rest to produce digital papers which offer a more tactile experience than glossy, but these will not help if photographers are merely making images by the score (or hundred) with their minds in neutral. A little thought and some exploration will reveal, for example, that it is possible to photograph people in a way other than standing staring expressionlessly full-face into the camera, arms by their sides, and that urban landscapes do not need to be photographed empty of people in flat lighting (although to judge by so much contemporary work, this is a very well-kept secret).

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