Switch to English Language Passer en langue franįaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,826   Posts: 1,582,034   Online: 792
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    54
    Images
    4
    My daughter is conducting a literacy through photography program in West Virginia this summer. Most all of the equipment was donated or given through a grant.
    "while a hundred civilizations have prospered (sometimes for centuries) without computers or windmills or even the wheel, none have survived even a few generations without art." David Bayles & Ted Orland Art & Fear

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    192
    At the darkroom that I use (Gallery 44, in Toronto) there is a similar program that has been going on for at least a few years now. Itīs called Outreach
    (http://www.gallery44.org/education/outreach2006.htm), and itīs aimed at teens who are having a tough time of it.

    Iīve been in the darkroom many times when theyīre in as well, and it always impresses me. Some of these kids look pretty rough around the edges. I recognize alot from around town - squeegee kids, panhandlers, etc. And here they are, puttering away in the darkroom, going over each otherīs prints and contact sheets, loupes to their eyes scrutinizing a negative to see if itīs sharp... I love it. They go about their business, and other members go about theirs. Itīs all perfectly īnormalī, which I think helps a great deal. I donīt know how much īnormalīalot of these teens get in life.

    Thereīs no onus to print on fibre paper, or shoot with a Hassleblad. Grants pay for the majority of their supplies, and I expect theyīve got some deal worked out with one of the labs for negative processing. Someone puts in a lot of effort - I donīt know enough about it - but it all seems to run smoothly.

    I canīt imagine anyone arguing that this is *not* a great thing. I would hope similar programs exist in cities through the world. Whether itīs photography, painting, or jazz dance for all I care - It all falls under the umbrella of being a good experience. Kids like these desperately need more good experiences, on top of the fundamentals like food and shelter.

    This is where grants from large companies and organizations prove their worth. Small amounts of money can make a really significant difference in programs like these.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    775
    Images
    28
    photography doesn't have to be expensive. i used to be a darkroom co-ordinator for my university photoclub in ontario and the used camera stores would sell us old nikon/pentax/vivitar cameras for 20-45$ with lenses. they would sell them at cost or give us free ones that didn't have working light meters, winders, etc. that could be fixed up with the proper parts. there's lots of support for programs like that and if you're starting out "quality" is a foreign word. of course a contax slr with zeiss lenses will run you a few hundred, but a pentax k1000 with a 50mm lens goes for about 50$ on ebay and is a great starter camera that when used right can take just as good of photos as any contax/zeiss combo. there's worse ways to spend 50$ -i think it's an amazing project.

    i work in a homeless shelter as a caseworker and every kid who walks through the door with addiciton issues basically started "experimenting" through boredom, peer pressure and a drive to be badass and hard. i think photography at least takes care of a couple of those variables. if they're spending their money on camera gear and film, it's hard to buy crack.

  4. #14
    wheelygirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    [for now] Arizona, U. S. A. [near future?] "Land of Enchantment"[NM]
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    204
    Images
    14
    Howdy everyone!
    There is a specific book that has given me the inspiration to 'do' this type of project, on a smaller scale, I think. The title is, "Shooting Back: Photographic View of Life by Homeless Children" selected by Jim Hubbard. Ihad been homeless, as an adult, and it is very scary at times--I want the children to be able to gain siome sort of comfort, community with their images. Heaven only knows when this idea of mine will get off the ground, but that is a desire of mine!
    [FONT=Verdana]"the real truth of a photographic image is in its ability to evoke emotion."--Bryan Peterson[/FONT]
    [COLOR="DarkOrchid"]My Muse wheels Herself about in a wheel-chair![/COLOR]

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin