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  1. #21
    Andy K's Avatar
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    At the moment 'recycling' is more a salve to people's conscience than it is an environmental boon.

    About half the UK's 'recycled waste' is shipped abroad. It is all part of the big Green con. We get taxed for recycling, charged for bin collections, told that we are helping to save the environment, and it's all lies.

  2. #22
    Lee L's Avatar
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    One way that I come by enough computer parts to recycle at the drop off is that I recycle before that is done. Through connections to people who have older computer equipment to dispose of because of regular upgrades, I get used computer hardware, assemble working boxes with decent performance, install linux that will do automatic upgrades and run much better and faster than MS on the older hardware, and give them to my kids, their friends, my friends, and installed them where I worked. This puts the stuff to use rather than into landfill or materials recycling. What I can't use in this way gets recycled, and a bunch of people get free computers in the bargain.

    If I came into any digital cameras, I'd likely give them away as well.

    Lee

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stever View Post
    Good point. While I have not taken the time to check it out, the ewaste is sent to state approved recycling plants. One hopes that Govenator Arnold Schwartie is doing the right things. He has been pushing for tougher environmental regulation of CO2.

    Steve
    Steve,

    Actually, my post to yours was not a challenge but an observation.

    I wish you good luck in finding out if the recycling plants are actually located in the Golden Bear State. If so, that is great news. However, even if some such plants are in CA, I would not be surprised to find that much of the pre-sorted eWaste actually goes to China. It's likely it serves as "ballast" on the various container ship return voyages after the finished goods they carried here have arrived at the Port of Long Beach.

    BTW: The reason I would expect this is that already China is the largest importer of recyclable cardboard and paper products. They need it to make new boxes to send us new finished goods.

  4. #24

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    Well, I went to pharmacy stores, medical institutions, municipality offices and places like that with question where I can drop my photo chemistry waste. Answer was nowhere. So, I asked in clinics can I drop that waste with them and they to deal with it when they deal with biological and other waste they have, that is to process it into theire bilogical waste processing infrastucture. They told me I can't.

    So, my options are:

    1. Drop my photo chemistry waste through toilet,

    2. Collect waste year after year and waiting for waste processing plants to start working here,

    3. Export my waste to other countries to process it, and

    4. Get hands up of photography.

    So, answer is obvious, and yes, I sleep well...
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

  5. #25
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    At the moment 'recycling' is more a salve to people's conscience than it is an environmental boon.

    About half the UK's 'recycled waste' is shipped abroad. It is all part of the big Green con. We get taxed for recycling, charged for bin collections, told that we are helping to save the environment, and it's all lies.
    A silmilar story in Northern Ireland found that the council were paying a processing plant to sort and recycle, when in fact they were sending lorry loads up to a nearby mountain and beauty spot to be buried.

    I'm still trying to figure out why taxation helps the planet???

  6. #26
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Holliday View Post

    I'm still trying to figure out why taxation helps the planet???
    Well, a politician would say higher taxes on fuel encourage careful use and less pollution. They get the added bonus that they can levy those taxes on almost anything and claim it is an environmental tax. Then they can go use those taxes to improve society with socially beneficial, and environmentally friendly items like this.

  7. #27
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    I'm sure Mother Nature would agree, she needs money. I hope those new carriers will keep the Argies at bay!

  8. #28
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    At the moment 'recycling' is more a salve to people's conscience than it is an environmental boon.
    I agree. So far as that recycling is not necessarily a cycle.
    We consumers have been made to separate those renown plastic bags to have made those renown park benches from. But what comes after the park bench? In this recycling discussion it is often overlooked that a downgrading is involved, which means that the cycle cannot be closed and the whole thing means merely postponing the incineration.

  9. #29

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    There are city-funded recycling places where I live where I can drop off junk like building materials, ewaste, motor oil, batteries, etc. but after I drop them off I'm not sure what happens to them. I know a lot of my friends are into recycling and re-using plastic bags but when I asked them what happens to their recycling after it's dropped into the recycling bin, none of them could give me an answer.

  10. #30

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    PE -

    you mention that computer-stuff uses selenium, so do a lot of photographers.
    where does their wash water go? into the environment, just like their silver.
    while silver is a benign element, it is still illegal in many places to just pour
    it down the drain. if someone makes money off of their photographic work,
    often times they have their waste hauled away ( i do, or i get fined ), and if someone is a
    hobbiest, often times the believe their little amount of whatever toxic
    chemical they pour down the drain doesn't matter, the sewer system will
    take care of it, or their septic system can handle it ... every little bit
    matters.

    yes, silver is used in the medical industry as a ointment for burns and with
    newborns ... just as selenium is an mineral found in seawater and vitimins,
    but just the same, we keep dumping this stuff we are only making our
    environment toxic. and we all know, we reep what we sow ...



    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Here we are in the midst of getting rid of tungsten light bulbs and introducing the spiral lamps which use mercury. We talk about the reduction in mercury in the atmostphere from power plants offsetting the mercury in the lamps.

    The problem is that dropping a spiral bulb in the home releases a concentrated form of a mercury salt. And that is similar to the problem with digital. Digital this and that contains mercury, arsenic, selenium and a host of other things that are concentrated in the device. These cannot be eliminated. They can go to a dump and be recycled (we hope), but see the article in last weeks Time magazine about the problem of waste dumps in China. Digital products use heavy metals both in the device itself and in the manufacturing process of the device.

    Analog photography uses organic chemicals along with silver. Silver is a very benign metal, used medically for years as an antisceptic. The organic chemicals can be easily disposed of. Any heavy metals present are used at such low concentrations they are difficult to detect and present no significant problems.

    Developers can be evaporated and burned safely with a good environmentally correct incinerator and color bleach and blix, when desilvered, can be used dilute as an approximate substitute for miracid on some plants. We worked long and hard to insure that photographic chemistry is as harmless as possible.

    And now, digital printers want to use pigment inks. Well, some pigments rely on the use of heavy metals. I think this is another potentially harmful item to be aware of.

    This same type of question keeps coming up over and over and over.

    PE
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

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