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  1. #11
    Andy K's Avatar
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    To an extent I agree. You have to remember the GN was written throughout the Thatcher years, when there was great social upheaval and hardship for millions and things were looking bleak here in Britain.
    The film however was made during the Blair years, of near totalitarian government, a nanny state, and it showed. To be honest, if things don't change soon, then politically Britain isn't very far away from that portrayed in the film.
    IMO, neither the GN or the film are what I would call masterpieces, but I did enjoy them, and each reflects the prevailing attitudes at their respective times of creation quite well.


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    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  2. #12
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Yes, but I think there's more than the changing political context. Perhaps the urgency is not the same, but the movie treatment removed a lot of conflicting internal motivations in characters (Evey, for instance) and put V's method much less into question.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  3. #13
    kaygee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Have you ever had the "oh, you're studying literature, anyone can do that?" The disciplines are partly to blame for their perceived frivolity, but it seems to be a common misperception you don't need to study what everyone takes for granted.
    I've never gotten that response but I have gotten on several occasions... "archaeology? why would you study that?" But not said in an interested way, almost said in a way like they had just heard I collect bird feces.

    I think a lot of that stuff is deemed as unimportant. People don't seem to understand without a knowledge of our history, there's absolutely no way we can understand ourselves today. It's ignorance really, plain and simple.

    Interesting story that happened: a friend said that keeping any sort of pet or animal was ammoral. It conflicts with the animal's basic nature to roam free or some such nonsense. Basically, with this statement all domestication is ammoral, and shouldn't have been done, therefore not creating sedentry communities of people, therefore no civilization. He did not think about it in that manner, because quite frankly, it's an ignorant way to think.

    Sorry - am I going off? I just hate it when people spout things they don't have any education on!

  4. #14
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaygee View Post
    Sorry - am I going off? I just hate it when people spout things they don't have any education on!
    Oh no, keep it coming! With art/literature, the single most annoying thing I hear is that "it's all opinion and yours is as good as mine." I don't think you even need a shard of an undergrad degree to figure that out, but even undergrads themselves have a hard time figuring out the difference between multiple admissible interpretaions and relativism.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I've gotten lots of jokes about my undergraduate degree - English Literature is usually seen as qualifying one for being the most articulate cashier at McDonalds. While it never got me a job by itself, coupled with other qualifications, it has actually been a big plus, because people in the business world have seen it as proof that I can communicate effectively.

  6. #16
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    kayge
    Sorry - am I going off? I just hate it when people spout things they don't have any education on!

    So what you think how many on this Apug are photo-educ yet argue with anyone. I think you are correct, but if all on Apug think that way this site will die. I will not be far off the truth if say max 0.00001% of all "photographers" have some education in photography. So what now? The problem I see is that photography is not a good business so why to study? Some that study it see them free from some math problems (like on e.g. engineering) and great possibility to get "education" on the "easy way". Another side is get used camera register business for $80 and it is all, he/she is a "pro". Now all are same, unlike one that buy injection will never be a doctor. So where is now education in photography?

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  7. #17

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    Umberto Eco, Travels in Hyperreality.

  8. #18

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    When I was young, I studied Literature and went on to do an MA in Contemporary English Literature. I did this because I loved reading and writing about stories, and poetry, and I was lucky enough to get a grant to pursue my studies. I've never seen myself as an academic, but I found that side of things quite easy, and it was a way to allow me to do what I loved doing - reading books -and not have to think about earning a living, or people telling me to do something useful.

    Later (several years ago) and quite a lot of water - family/work - under the bridge, I studied photography full-time. This I found invaluable as I was able to hone my technical skills, learn to work on projects, and learn a lot more about the history and theory of photography (and art).

    Fundamentally, though, I have used both these opportunities not as things 'out there' but as a way of looking within, like an absorption, and what comes from both is something from deep within me. I truly believe that 'within me' would be there whether or not I had studied formally, at different times of my life. But I have been lucky enough in both cases to have the time to devote to developing the 'within me', my creative capacity, without the distraction of having to think about mundane matters like where my next meal was coming from - (though I did have substantial family commitments in the latter case).

  9. #19
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I've gotten lots of jokes about my undergraduate degree - English Literature is usually seen as qualifying one for being the most articulate cashier at McDonalds. While it never got me a job by itself, coupled with other qualifications, it has actually been a big plus, because people in the business world have seen it as proof that I can communicate effectively.
    As an English Major soon to be an English Master (??), I can only assent with your experience. English never got me a job, but it has helped me get most of my jobs, if you catch my drift.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  10. #20
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I've gotten lots of jokes about my undergraduate degree - English Literature is usually seen as qualifying one for being the most articulate cashier at McDonalds. While it never got me a job by itself, coupled with other qualifications, it has actually been a big plus, because people in the business world have seen it as proof that I can communicate effectively.
    Absolutely. Good communication skills are key. Of course, I have seen a lot of business communication I would classify as 'prose fiction'. I also have encountered both CPA's and attorneys that seemed incapable of writing a complete sentence.:rolleyes:

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

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