Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,854   Posts: 1,582,941   Online: 1002
      
Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678
Results 71 to 75 of 75
  1. #71
    Bandicoot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Eastern England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    201
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    With the arrival of the post-modern, abstract expressionist movements, the interest in relating to those humanist ideas has gone away, to be replaced by a de-humanization and abstraction to the point that art is now only about art, and not about the people who make it.
    I know what you're getting at, but I think that is a little sweeping, Not all post abstract expressionist art is so 'abstracted' - consider someone like Anthony Gormley. And of course there are those who have deliberately created works that draw on explicit references where the whole point is about how we approach the use of such references - Jeff Wall, Cindy Sherman...

    Similarly, even (to go back in time) someone like Mondrian put a great deal of himself into how he chose to place the elements in his works, as is clear from his writings. This sort of work appears abstracted, but it is not truly de-humanised: perhaps it is a distillation rather than an abstraction.

    But for all that, I am picking up on the exceptions - I don't dispute your point that a lot of more recent art has gone in the direction you suggest. Some of it I like for that (Anish Kapoor, to cite just one), but some has become arid and sterile.


    Peter

  2. #72

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,355
    I think art is always about the people who make it.

    Some artists are braver at revealing themselves in their work than others, and at crossing the boundaries of art and craft - one name that springs to mind is Grayson Perry, who won the Turner Prize a few years ago.

  3. #73
    kaygee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    B.C., Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    91
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by Bandicoot View Post
    That said - there are plenty of excavations that will take volunteers on, some even run specifically as training digs, and you might find someone that was very happy to have you get involved and use your photographic skills.


    Peter
    Ah, I figured by the sound of it one of those had to at least be in the Middle East! I tell you, the more I grew up, the less I wanted the bullwhips and the pistols, and more just the quiet digging .

    You know, you make a good point, I think I might try to find a dig to piggyback on.

  4. #74
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Mississauga, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    420
    MurrayMinchin you are correct. Artists are born, not made. However born artist still need to work 18 hour a day, and it is not difficult to him, but rather make him happy. Bull in school - bull out of school.
    Ancient Greek artist did his task the best he could and it was not at the end of his brain that people, young and old, men and woman, will talk about him and his work thousands years later, he just toiled hard for his bread. And without knowledge of his work any today artist will have hard life, photographers too. Without knowledge what is meaning of "working of the soul" and wishing to be called artist right now (money sake) is like walk at night through a junge. Art is a continuous process and without knowing history of art many will call and dig*** joke "huge art", or even invent a name as "dig*** photography", and store and store and store, which is the very first sign he do not knows what he is doing. This is an example of a point where to them Academy (I mean real Academy) is really a must. But, well such people addorned this planet throughout history, and stupidity will never end.

    And to original question: One of great think I got on Academy is not to spend my life looking for definition of art, especialy on internet, but rather seat and work to make living, and also to distinguish between mediums and to know limitations of each, and so to choose right one for the task.

  5. #75
    DrPablo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    796
    Images
    63
    I am an academic myself, though in the field of medicine.

    I've found that when reading the primary literature in fields like social sciences, humanities, and arts, it is becoming more and more systematized and scientific. That doesn't mean that it lends itself to the same quantitative rigor as physics or chemistry, but it seems to me that the effort is there to add stringency to artistic study as well.
    Paul

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin