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  1. #11

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    "I have a book of Annie Leibowitz' photos. Several of the pictures presented there - with "film frame" - have been published elsewhere in different (larger) crops.

    Now THAT is blatantly fake. I do not like that at all." Quote.

    Since I have printed much of Annie's work I would be interested in which images you are speaking of? If you are talking of images that might have been reproed in various magazines, you should know that the photographer rarely has control over what the art director/editor desires. And as a side note her name is spelt LEIBOVITZ.

  2. #12
    Ole
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    Sorry 'bout the spelling - you're right of course.

    I don't have a magazine at the moment, but I remember I got the magazine at the same time as the book: "Photographs ANNIE LEIBOVITZ 1970-1990".
    And the tighter crop with added "frames" is in the book...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13

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    Sloppy frames (as I call them) seem to be in style again. I sometimes leave them in when contact printing, sometimes I take a scissors to them and cut them off the sides. 35mm sprocket holes on an enlargement however make no sense to me... they are ugly and distracting. I don't really care if a person's final print is "as it was shot", or carefully cropped. As much as we all try to do our framing and "cropping" in-camera, there are always times that a better composition will occur to us in the darkroom.

  4. #14

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    OLETJ,

    Actually this is one of the projects i worked on with Annie and none of the images were cropped.
    But getting back to the Black boarder. One use for including it on prints is that, if the prints are to be ove rmatted, the black boarder allows you to matt right up to the edge of the image area and helps eliminate the chance of the white paper showing when the print is viewed from the side.

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There are some amusing Photoshopped framelines in an ad in the current issue of _The New Yorker_ (2 June 03), following p. 42. The ad is for a group of resorts. There are four views, each a 6x7 transparency, RDP, numbered sequentially, of four different locations. So if we believe them, the photographer used either shot these views at least 10 years ago or using old Fujichrome 100 that long out of date, went to each location, took one shot, and went to the next location for the next shot. Must have used bulk 70mm film, too, since the frames are numbered from 33-40 (645 numbering).
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
    fhovie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    the next shot. Must have used bulk 70mm film, too, since the frames are numbered from 33-40 (645 numbering).
    Seems to me Fuji film has a separate set of numbers for each format on their 120 film. The 40 series is for 645 format I believe. I thought those started with 40 though - maybe you are right about the 70mm.
    I don't shoot much Fuji 120 any more. When I do shoot color, I like Kodak VC for 120. (OK NC for portraits once in a while - god help me if I have to do another wedding)
    Frank
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  7. #17

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    Frank - God can't help you if you do a wedding as you are already in hell.

    I just dropped off a CD for some Frontier prints (I know....I know...but at least it is REAL photographic paper....besides I needed the stuff in a hurry....), and the guy behind the counter said "Do you want borders with that?" and proceeded to try and show me the "Big Book of Borders" they have.

    Ick.
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  8. #18
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    Indeed

  9. #19
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    IMHO, when it's in a magazine, the sprocket hole thing is more of a page layout graphic design decision [gimmick?] than a photographic one. Often they are shamelessly phony and overused. On the other hand, when Avedon exhibits his series of plain, straight-forward portraits in which he enlarges the entire sheet of film, notches and holder marks included, it is a creative decision that creates a connection between the photographer or at least the medium to the image and it's subject. It is no longer a print of the subject, it is a print of a photograph of the subject.

    From a personal presentation standpoint, I feel that a thin Black border around a printed image serves to separate any fine light tones that are adjacent to the edges of the image from visually running off into the border or White matte. I used to print it in in the darkroom but now I use that Black core matte board so that a bevel cut produces a defining Black line inside the white matte.

    Neal

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    There are some amusing Photoshopped framelines in an ad in the current issue of _The New Yorker_ (2 June 03), following p. 42.

    One of the reasons for starting this topic was a photograph I saw in the New Yorker (May 26,2003 P 101). It shows a very nice B&W photograph by Mary Ellen Mark of Paul Reiser, Kate Blumberg and Skipp Sudduth, but the edges of the photo look like a polaroid or someone holding a photo on a copy machine with the edges lifting. Looks like the photo is about 4X5" maybe a LF camera with a polaroid back?

    I wonder if a photographer has any control over how the work is presented once it is sold to a magazine...

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