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Thread: Natural Vision

  1. #11
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    I read the article also, and wondered about AA and his color photography comment. I took a workshop at his hallowed enclave at Yosemite. One of the reasons he did poorly with color was he hated color. Now how many of you could produce a good picture if you had to shoot something different with a medium you hated? He didn't take the time to get to know color's subtilties as he did B&W.....
    Hmmm. I guess you were far closer to Ansel Adams and his color work than I am, so ... no argument from me. I do have a couple of prints of his color photography... from "Horizons", March 1960.

    I wish I could do as "poorly" as these ... even a little bit.

    I've used these to illustrate "style". Most would not immediately recognize them as Ansel Adams work, being hooked into his image as a "Black and White" photographer - but once their authorship is known, they are obviously Ansel Adams photographs.

    It is nothing short of phenominal to me that he could do this well with a medium he "hated".
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #12

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    I guess it goes to show that basics stay the same.
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  3. #13

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    While everything that others have said is undoubtedly true in their experience, I will take this opportunity to share an experience of mine that occurred in 1984. It was on the 4th of July holiday and I was living in Colorado. I was using 35 mm then and I had my camera set up for extreme close up work so that I could no longer focus the lens and my plane of focus was within 1/4 inch of the front lens element. I was on Peru Creek below Argentine Pass in Colorado. I intended, on that day, to photograph wild flowers and began to do so. While doing so, I became aware of flies on the flowers and was engrossed with them to the extent that I began to photograph them. During that afternoon, I became very involved in the process of "truly seeing a fly" for the first time ever. I saw the hair on their torsos, the irridescence of their wings, and the facets of their eyes. I was involved in the "process" of seeing to the extent that I felt part of a "greater whole".

    I think that in my experience had I continued with the initial object of my attention (the wild flowers), I would have missed a wonderful and meaningful experience. I think that we are all involved in a process of "seeing" in new and unusual ways. To duplicate anothers vision would be to miss ours. To become so firmly entrenched in "usual" ways of seeing would be to disregard that which is there before us.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  4. #14
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I've just uploaded an example of Ansel Adams' color photography in the "Non-Gallery" gallery. Comments?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #15
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dnmilikan
    I think that in my experience had I continued with the initial object of my attention (the wild flowers), I would have missed a wonderful and meaningful experience. I think that we are all involved in a process of "seeing" in new and unusual ways. To duplicate anothers vision would be to miss ours. To become so firmly entrenched in "usual" ways of seeing would be to disregard that which is there before us.
    Wonderfully said!!!

    I follow my muse - (to hell with whether that sounds "trite" or not!). The best work that we do will invariably be that of whatever *fascinates* us. If one is fascinated by doorknobs, by all means - photograph doorknobs. If the subject is female nudes ..... or bridges, or ...
    What else makes any sense?

    That fascination does not have to be long standing. Momentary flights of imagination can be brilliant.

    It has taken a couple of decades, but I have finally decided that, for me, the way to go is to convince myself of my freedom of the moment; NOT "think too much" (Over-thinking is the photographic equivalent of "overworking" with pencil or charcoal); and FORGET every comment made by any critic ... whenever (that is, remove those from conscious thought ... the "good ones" will survive in pre-consciousness).

    So ... every once in a while, I get a "good one". I can't ask for more.

    I could really go out and KILL myself trying (been there, done that ... got the T-shirt) and ... every once in a while, I'd get a "good one"... but, much less frequently.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #16
    Aggie's Avatar
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  7. #17

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    Talk about tunnel vision
    I think we all see differently, and no amount of training or effort will change that. But we do try to expand and refine how we express what we see. If we all did see the same way and think the same way, there would be no point to photography really. Most people (including myself) try not to over-analyze it, for fear that it will become forced or contrived. When the urge hits me, I shoot whatever got my attention, no matter if it is a macro, still life or nature thing. Some people only shoot one type of thing, and to me that would be boring.

  8. #18
    lee
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    a friend and photographer who attended Rhode Island School of Design when Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind taught there, told me once, that at 55, he photographed the same as when he was 15. Only he was better at it. Kinda reinforces what Steve says.

    lee\c

  9. #19

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    being fairly new at photography, starting digital a couple of years ago and shifting to film in the last year, i hardly feel like i can say what my particular 'vision' might be. however, i certainly have noticed that there are certain subjects that are more likely to jump up and say 'there is an image here.' most often they are out in nature, and involve getting close to the subject; abstracting form out of the whole. still, i'm not sure i would want to classify that as my vision. instead it seems more like a natural strong point in how i see things. what that says to me is that there is a whole range of alternate visions out there for me to explore. i may try them and return to what comes more naturally, but i will always walk away from them with new insights that will impact my 'natural vision.'

  10. #20
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    I think Les' journal idea is a great one. I usually have a camera with me and do the same, keeping a file of "current" negs and contacts (these seem to go back about 2 years at any given time), that I might print and revisit until I feel I can file them away for a while, and even then I might take out some that have been filed for a while.

    I shoot a variety of subjects. I favor certain things like architecturals, portraits, and landscapes. I used to do a fair amount of street photography, but that's just not what I'm thinking about lately. I started photographing birds a few years ago as a way to learn about birds, because New York is an interesting region for birding. Bird photography accounts for 90% of what I shoot in color or 35mm these days.

    When I feel I need to do something different I'll do pinhole for a while or 35mm B&W or try some unusual film like XX cine stock or Fomapan T200 or I'll use a lens that I've neglected for some time.

    On the other hand, I can see a danger in becoming too eclectic and losing focus, so I don't feel inclined to abandon the subjects that I'm most familiar with.

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