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Thread: Natural Vision

  1. #21

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    I've just uploaded an example of Ansel Adams' color photography in the "Non-Gallery" gallery. Comments?
    Looks like he tried to make a stunning black and white photo in color. Doesn't really work for me as there is no reason for it to be in color. The color adds nothing to the photo and doesn't really aid in telling anything more about the subject.

  2. #22
    Aggie's Avatar
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  3. #23
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve
    I've just uploaded an example of Ansel Adams' color photography in the "Non-Gallery" gallery. Comments?
    Looks like he tried to make a stunning black and white photo in color. Doesn't really work for me as there is no reason for it to be in color. The color adds nothing to the photo and doesn't really aid in telling anything more about the subject.
    I have a few more, really more LIKE Ansel Adams' work... sadly they are printed two pages wide and I don't have software that will effectively "stitch" two partial images together. Personally, I think his work is equally as good in either black and white or color ... it is only more recognizable in black and white.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  4. #24

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    I've seen the book of his color work. I like color photography. So much so, that I've shot nothing but color since 1983 for my personal work. I'm not anti-color or anti Ansel Adams.

    The difference between a really good color photo and a black and white photo of the same subject is that when you look at the color photo and imagine it in black and white - or take a monochromatic viewing filter and look at the photo to see what it might look like in B&W - you end up saying, "no, works much better in color." In other words, the color gives an added dimension to the work that makes the photo work for that subject - and it absolutely would not work as well in B&W because of that added dimension.

    That just isn't true with Ansel's color work. When I look at his color work, it's a scene that looks good (well composed, framed, etc.) but, there is no intrinsic reason that the photo has to be in color. It could be done in B&W and work just as well, or perhaps even better. They are very good photos, they just don't have the added reason that they have to be rendered in color and no other way.

    I've also seen an exhibition of Edward Weston's color work. They were 8x10 Ilfochrome contact prints of the film he shot as part of an Eastman Kodak trial advertising campaign using famous photographers shooting Kodak color transparency film. Interestingly, he went back and exactly duplicated some of his black and white photos in color, others were new compositions. Although they were great compositions, they didn't have that "spark of recognition" that gives his B&W work so much life.

    This may be because he was using some subjects that he had already photographed successfully in B&W, and hence the "rediscovery" in color didn't gain his full involvement, but, even the new subjects didn't have an intimate interaction of the photographer with the color aspects of the subject. This is sort of a long way of saying, "interesting, yes - photos didn't work as color photos."

    To me, this is what makes color photography so difficult. It's a total involvement with seeing the subject for its color qualities and incorporating those into the photo in a way that reinforces the subject. You have to specifically find the reason for making a photo in color instead of in B&W. It's more than just finding a nice subject, setting up the camera, and loading it with color film instead of black and white. I just don't get the "total involvement with color" as part of Ansel's color work. Instead, I get the subsitution of color film for black and white with a subject.

    For all those reasons, they just don't work for me at a basic level as good color photographs.

  5. #25
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    What color photographers have made the work you like the most?

  6. #26

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    William Eggleston, Peter Goin, Len Jenshel, Lee Friedlander, Elgar Esser, Andy Goldsworthy, John Pfahl, Richard Misrach, Joel Meyerowitz - to name a few.

  7. #27
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve
    Lee Friedlander
    I've never seen a Lee Friedlander color photograph. Sounds most intriguing.

  8. #28
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Robert Farber, Howard Schatz, Christian Vogt, Laurie Jefferies, Joyce Tenneson ...
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #29

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    I put a photograph in the Standard Gallery to illustrate what I'm talking about when I say there has to be a reason for the color, and that the photo wouldn't work as well in B&W.

  10. #30

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    I'd like to comment on the original topic, when I saw this a couple days ago I thought wow! tough question. My wife and I where at the rennaissance fair a couple of weeks ago, as we were leaving we were faced with a sea of cars. when we got to the car Karen ask me "how did you know where the car was?"I said "I followed my feet". At first, It's great, this camera makes pictures, all you have to do is push a button. then as we refine we learn the technical, then we refine the conceptual and we soon have a viscious cycle, all along we're shooting images and evolving. At some point the technical becomes a given. At this point your instints have the freedom to kick in. You also have a huge backlog of experiances (film) that have dictated the answers as to what your interests are and I'm sure a couriosity for new experiances. Sooo Follow your feet!

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