Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,660   Posts: 1,481,552   Online: 944
      
Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 143
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    photographic vision does not exist. This ability is nothing more than being able to find beauty in the common things and that is only acquired by practice. I bet most of the great phtographers have shot thousands of rolls and sheets to arrive at a particular style. Even then not all of their photographs are memorable, there are only a few keepers in a life time. The basics can be taught and then is up to the photographer to grow, as the saying goes, practice makes perfect.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    London, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    21
    I bet most of the great phtographers have shot thousands of rolls and sheets to arrive at a particular style.
    Friedlander has repeatedly said in interviews that a lot of his images and contact sheets are a load of junk and that he may just find one that he thinks is good and prints. He always gets asked the sort of "what is your secret"? question. He usually just laughs, saying that there is no secret.

  3. #13
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,136
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by jdef
    What's the going rate to learn to "see photographically"?
    $595.00 and an open mind for Michael's and Paula's workshop. Biggest bargain out there. No MFA program will improve your photography more.

  4. #14
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    We are running the risk of becoming *mired down* in semantic duelling.

    I consider "Vision" to be that element of photography - and all the other "art" disciplines- that area that cannot be explained using logic and reason.

    Technique - the use of the associated "tools" (oh, go ahead - include the so-called "rules" of composition) *CAN* most certainly be taught, and learned .
    To me the technique is important - and well worth the effort to learn ...but it is secondary to the "Vision" - that unexplained - and unexplainable - essence that links our being to the work.

    Why did I take that photograph, -- and this is grinding fine -- that *particular* image, given the choice of the infinite number that pass in front of the lens every second? What was the mechanism inside of my psyche that caused me to trigger the shutter at that particuar instant? Why did I choose that specific subject? - And why do I choose to work in a certain "area" ... landscapes, or nudes, or cute little kittens...?

    More than that ... Why does one image fascinate me --- try to explain "fascination" - and why does one image "work" for me, and not another? I can't even begin to define "work" in this context.

    To all that, I can only answer, "I don't really know" - and quite some time ago I accepted the idea that I would never really know. Trying to slavishly hold to the scientific ideal - that, "It doesn't exist if it cannot be explained", was a crushing burden that only served to sap my strength.

    We had a *wonderful* artist in the Cape Ann area, here ... named Helen Van Wyk. She taught art - oil painting - and I never missed any of her shows televised on PBS. One of her favorite sayings was, "The `Doing" is not all that hard ... we can all, with enough effort, learn the techniques - the `doing". The `What to Do' -- That is the hard part."
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #15
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    photographic vision does not exist. This ability is nothing more than being able to find beauty in the common things and that is only acquired by practice.
    Hmm. I don't know ... I, and I know others (mostly children) who constantly find beauty everywhere - and I don't think either of us have every practiced - at least not consciously.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #16
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,136
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    ... I, and I know others (mostly children) who constantly find beauty everywhere
    I'm always amazed with what my 7 year old daughter does when I turn her loose with a Hasselblad, which she can't even focus. If I can learn to see like she and her sister (who's 9) do, I'll rule.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    154
    I alway thought I was a much better photographer until I learned how. The freedom that children have when they don't know the rules they just play. I agree, Just imagine if we as adults could retain the rules of focus and exposure then step back to 7 or 9 years old and "just play". Course my wife thinks I act like 10 year old anyway so maybe i'm halfway their.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    Ah yes, I have heard of this children are great and so free. The truth is there is a lot of parental pride, and they are shooting from below 5 feet, try it, your pictures might look like your kids.

    WHat I am talking about is creating a negative and a print which will wow people...not one where they say ah thats nice...
    I have seen these children pictures...and to tell the truth they were not good...but wanted to keep the parent as friend so I never said so..

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    154
    I just put a picture my 9year old neice shot of her sister one day when I gave her my camera, my only sugestion to her was to try and keep the horizon line straight. I love this so I used it as a concept for a job later that year.

    It's in the no-gallery

  10. #20

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Rome Italy
    Posts
    56
    Images
    1
    Ok I'm grabbing my courage, the few word of english I know and try an give my contribution on this topic.
    Often when talking about photography the word vision comes around, it is used as if the ability of taking good photos was a gift. Something like a blessing. I've been thinking the same line for a long time and I've been about to quit taking photos. I have to admit it: I am not blessed or gifted. But I believe I have something to say, emotions to rappresent, to record, to exchange with others. That's why I keep shooting, experimenting and learning. Sometimes it appens I manage to express what I have in mind to say. It takes a great effort, often it is frustrating, but I feel it is worth it.
    Ciao,
    Marcello

Page 2 of 15 FirstFirst 1234567812 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin