Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,646   Posts: 1,481,272   Online: 804
      
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 61
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Just north of the Inferno
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    750
    Images
    27
    That is exactly as it should be. If doorknobs fascinate you, for heavens sake, take photographs of doorknobs. Or clouds, or ...
    I once saw a wonderful book based on an unusual theme, "Outhouses"; another on *wonderful* graffitti in the Greenwich Village area of New York....
    Hell, look at Siskand.

    The guy made an AMAZING image of peeling paint!

    Remember, you can find beauty in the least of things....
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  2. #22
    lee
    lee is offline
    lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth TX
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,913
    Images
    8
    I am glad that Robert mentioned Siskind. As I stated before, Aaron Siskind was a mentor to me. He just did not know it or me. He would have been 100 years old this year and there is/was a very major exhibit at the Center for Contemporary Photography in Tucson. I trust Robert went to see the exhibit. Aaron was a photo verison of an Abstract Expressionist. In Black and White....

    lee\c

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    651
    Ader: "what do you do when you know something would make a great photo but when you take it it looks like the proverbial "crap".... I see tons of stuff that I think look great, then when I've taken them and printed them, they look very plain !!!!!maybe I should just be more discerning ..........."

    It is how one sees, not what one sees that makes any photograph interesting.

    You need to see space and not just the ostensible subject.

    This posting is not meant to be an advertisement for our (Paula Chamlee's and my) workshops (we don't need it--they are always full), but your problem is exactly what we deal with.

    Practice alone, if you are not seeing photographically, will not help you. For now, save your film. Look at the work of the great photographers and try to see what the difference between their work and your work is. When you fell you have it, go photograph again.

    Good luck.

    Michael A. Smith

    Michael A. Smith

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pikes Peak
    Posts
    205
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael A. Smith
    Practice alone, if you are not seeing photographically, will not help you. For now, save your film. Look at the work of the great photographers and try to see what the difference between their work and your work is. When you fell you have it, go photograph again.
    I feel I must question this statement, but as your experience and knowledge is so far beyond my own I am probably missing something.

    I have tried what I believe you are suggesting and without the feedback from my own efforts I have made no progress at all. What seems to help is to focus in (pun intented) on a particular subject such as the famous Weston green pepper and see how close I can come to duplicating it. Not so that I can show "my pepper photo" but so that I can learn how to achieve a particular look as to framing, posing, exposure, processing etc. Just because I photograph a pepper and it looks blah doesn't mean there isn't something there.

    For me the same applies to landscapes and architecture and sometimes requires that I travel a long trip back to the scene of my failure and try it again after analysing the results. If I haven't learned HOW I can achieve a particular look I will probably continue to feel that it was just not a suitable subject instead of a failure in my technique or vision.

    I have always felt that if you don't waste some film you will never learn. This despite my addiction to numerous books.

    Bob

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,627
    Images
    154
    I agree with Bob, Micheal that statement is rediculous!
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    229
    Lately I seem to find myself in the position of wondering why Michael's statements seem to provoke ire. I'm not sure what the problem is.

    While I don't have the expertise to advise folks authoritatively I'll agree that sometimes we're better off looking with our eyes rather than through a camera. There's something often alienating or distancing about that lens and focus screen. It can distort our vision.

    A typical example of not *seeing* occurs when newbies are surprised that a polarizing filter sometimes turns skies nearly black. They've never actually scanned the entire horizon. If they had they'd recognize that at certain times the sky is naturally polarized. Add an ultra wide angle lens, polarizer and Velvia and you have a recipe for blue-black skies. But they never take that camera away from their eyes to simply *see*.
    Three degrees of separation from Kevin Bacon.

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    651
    Well, I see that some of you out there in photography land simply don't get it. There is no such thing as a subject that would not make a wonderful photograph if it were seen in an exciting way. No subject matter is out of bounds. I am willing to bet you guys, and anyone who feels as you do, that a good photographer can make a fine photograph anywhere. I know I can. That's the easy part and is really rather uninteresting. The point of making photographs, as I see it, is to challenge oneself and to thereby grow, not just to make good pictures.

    Just the other day our assistant, having a few hours off, wandered over to a place where we are doing some construction and made a wonderful photograph of a rough concrete slab. This slab was something I would certainly walk right past, and I warrant everyone reading this would, too, without even vaguely considering that it was worthy subject matter.

    if you are somewhere that moves you to photograph, and you cannot get a good photograph of it be asured that it is you, not the place or subject that is the problem. Always.

    Now about "practice," I'm not against using lots of film. The way anyone learns the most is from their own mistakes. But Ader wrote that the problem he was having was a continual problem. At a certain point, if you are not getting it, there is no sense in using more film. something else has to change. That is what I was talking about. It appears you (Thomas and Bob F) took my comment about practice out of context--out of the context of who I was responding to.

    When you are stuck (as a photographer or at anything else) it doesn't make sense to keep repeating the same thing--in this case making more bad pictures--something else has to change. When you are spinning your wheels you don't keep doing it, you get out, find a board or something, or if you cannot get out of the rut yourself you get a tow.

  8. #28
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ipswich, Massachusetts, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,520
    Images
    26
    Lately I seem to find myself in the position of wondering why Michael's statements seem to provoke ire. I'm not sure what the problem is.
    Guys...

    Provoke ire? Why? Does the idea that someone else has a different point of view, or different modus operandi seem somehow not acceptable?
    I'm not suggesting that anyone accepts anything on its face value... we all should listen to what was said; and consider that even wholly different points of view can possibly contain SOME truth in them.

    I'll toss an idea into the arena: It is true that at times we try too hard. In pencil sketching, it is called "overworking" - and considered as a mortal sin. The antidote is the "one-minute poses", where all the artist has TIME for is to get lines on the paper, without squeezing the living hell out of themselves in an effort to be perfect. The results are invariably surprising - weighted heavily to the "good" side. It is amazing, literally, how well we can do if we let ourselves be directed by our pre-conscousnesses.
    Those statements can only be considered with due attention to degree. The quest to learn is a noble one, and must be maintained.., but the "moment of truth" is NOT the time for practice or learning. At that moment, we have to DO ... let our "innards" take over - and NOT think or try, but let the idea of getting the image to the film be the only thought.

    There is a parallel exercize in photography. DO NOT use the viewfinder. Hold the camera at arms length and press the shutter release.
    I've taken panoramas where I've held the camera overhead to clear parked cars) and simply pointed the camera in the general direction of "across the street", and tripped the shutter on every third or fourth step. Developed and printed, and then mounted in sequence, these can form an interesting and successful image.

    This is one of the most difficult assignments for neophytes. Losing control, without the security of that viewfinder, is a frightening thing. But - why? Some strange and bizaare image *might* be the result, but I haven't heard of an explosion, or grave physical harm to anyone yet.

    The neophyte usually does "burn film" in his/her enthusiasm. Expensive, but not necessrily a "bad thing". I've yet to meet anyone involved in photograhy who didn't care about their work... and no matter how much film we burn, or how rocky the road is, we will all learn - whether we WANT to or not.

    We can hope to smooth the way, and eliminate some of the pain, if we try to help, gently ... n.b. "GENTLY". Suggesting a different way of "seeing" ? Interesting. Why not? Will there be an explosion ... or might it just work?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Pikes Peak
    Posts
    205
    "Provoke ire"?? I have noticed many attacks on Michael but I sure hope that wasn't refering to me as there was absolutely no sarcasm in my admiration for Michael's experience and knowledge. I love his work and wish I could afford some examples of it to help me on my learning curve. And maybe decorate a wall. :-)

    I simply wanted to understand what he was saying as it didn't make sense to me but the second post clarifies it and I have nothing to dissagree with. APUG is a forum for exchanging ideas and if you don't "get it" ya need to ask, so I did.

    Bob

    BTW Ed that's a good Idea, just do it and see what happens. Reminds me of learning tennis when I was told to quit thinking and just react, my game improved immediately. But of course I had already learned some basics first.

  10. #30
    Aggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    So. Utah
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,925
    Images
    6
    ..

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin