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  1. #11
    blansky's Avatar
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    Don's initial thread either self destructed or was intentionally tampered with by someone.

    Could have been OSAMA.

  2. #12
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Sorry I don't remember what Don's definition of MAP was (besides Middle Age Photographer which is certainly me), but I'll try to pick up on the theme from what I can remember.

    My photography is certainly influenced by what I experienced early in life. I think its much more than simple nostalgia. The themes or characteristics of the subjects seem to hold steady through the years amended with new experiences as they are collected.

    I think if one looks at the backgrounds of the Masters, one can see the same thing. These early influences keep surfacing strongly throughout their careers. Weston started as a painter and portratist. This background is underlying his work. Ansel Adams was deeply moved by Yosemite early in his life. He lived there as an adult and made his stake to prominence with photographs from there. Steiglitz was an urban sophisticate - and it shows. Plowden grew up in Middle America and has made fame photographing it. Gordon Parks made his mark portraying the social injustice of harsh discrimination - something he grew up with. These are just a few off the top of my head.

    I don't think of MAP when I go out, at least conciously. But then, maybe I put myself back in the viewpoint of a young boy to find what fascinates me about the image in the lens.

  3. #13
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Most of the greatest artists in any medium are not terribly good at explaining their own work, and I don't think that's a bad thing. Part of what makes it interesting is that mystery that even the artist couldn't explain in any other terms, and if he or she could translate the work into simple expository prose, then the work itself probably wouldn't be as rich.

    Better to leave the explanations to the critics and the historians. That is what they can (sometimes) do well.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #14
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    Weston started as a painter and portratist. This background is underlying his work. Ansel Adams was deeply moved by Yosemite early in his life. He lived there as an adult and made his stake to prominence with photographs from there.
    This is interesting - This is the first time I've heard of Edward Weston as a painter. I knew that he:

    "Trained for track events, took boxing lessons, excelled in archery, took cold baths, and preriodically went on quasi-vegetarian diets (which he claimed purged him body and soul). He was a life-long nudist and sun-worshipper, believed in astrology, rejected traditional medicine, and disputed the virtues of vaccination." - from "Edward Weston - Forms of Passion.
    He was given his first camera by his father in 1902, with instructions to "Take only snapshots", advice he immediately ignored. From then on, it appears that his entire artistic involvement was in photography.

    Adams spent much of his early life in San Francisco - slated by his parents to be a pianist. He had his nose broken as a casualty of the Great San Francisco earthquake of 1906. I don't think he ever had permanent residence in Yosemite. I do know he travelled extensively - just where he "settled" ...I don't remember.

    These are just "little picky obsevations." I agree wholeheartedly with the main idea of what you are saying... Our work is undeniably a product of our experiences... and our reactions to them.

    I am a great believer in the value of "cross-training". The musician has a different view of, and approach towards, life than does the sculptor. Certainly a dancer's view of life is different than that of the photographer; but - the vision of the photographer is expanded and enhanced by "gaining access to the dancer's being" and gaining some understanding of the dancer's underlying philosophies, disciplines and methods of operation.

    Somewhere, someone wrote that they would not try painting, or sketching - or something like that - because they were convinced that they would not be "good" at it. That may be ... but if I were to struggle - very unsuccessfully - with dance - and the net result was what *I* perceived to be an improvement in my photography -- well - hand me my slippers and skin tight britches, reinforce the floor - get ready to laugh your gluteus maximus off - and stand back!
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #15

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    I have read in a magazine that dance can improve photography skills, so let's see a photo of you in those tights.:^)

  6. #16
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    I have to admit that I didn't get the in-jokes off-hand, and thought that Don's "13" was a smilie of breasts... guess that shows where my mind is at! (in other words, my photography has never changed since I started, heh)

    I've noticed the MAP phenomenon but am surprised to find it has an acronym that is known so readily. My own reading of it has been that MAP photography (according to my own demarcation of MAP) is an MLC (mid-life-crisis) compensatory reaction (usually a blossoming that comes along as "I had a camera but never really started examining my creative side seriously until my divorce, my oldest was in high school, etc") that concentrates intently on "the right way" and spends an inordinate amount of time worrying about rules of thirds and esoteric developer combinations, arguing about whether the Summitar is better than the Serenar, sticking close to established themes (generally of the low-impact variety, such as boats at the dock, the Tetons, adorable grandchildren, the Eiffel Tower...), and fretting about how various MOPs (Masters of Photography) would have handled things -- never about taking risks. Generally this suite of behaviours equals (to me) EMP (Extremely Mannered Photography) and it gives me the creeps when it doesn't just make me sad.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  7. #17
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    I don't know about dance improving photography skills, but it's proven to improve football skills. Picture an NFL lineman in tights!!

  8. #18
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