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Thread: "Archival"

  1. #21
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Kennedy
    But if you cool things the "dew point" or the point at where condensation occurs becomes lower. Seems like a double edged sword. Too cool and you precipitate moisture out of the air onto the subject. Too dry and you dry out the subject.

    Screw it, I'm only going to work with etchings on titanium surfaces stored in abandoned salt mines....

    geez...talk to the conservators, okay?

    for film & paper, you can't get too cool. If you could freeze your files you'd be in like Flint. the relative humidity though--has to be just right. there's a range of like 20-50% that's good. there always has to be some moisture in the film or it would dry up & crack. the room & the film would eventually even out--but this would be for some dedicated storage spot--not some room with cycling ambient temps & rh's like you described above.

    you'd want to find a place in your house, that is the most stable. like an interior room away from the outside walls. away from windows & doors to the exterior. someplace buffered...if you get good cabinets, or boxes or whatever--you can create a "microclimate" almost--and the changes on the outside will take longer to effect the inside--as long as it stays closed. There are some products, like Artsorb--that are good for cycling rh's. This is an alternative to silica gel--it's "programmed" to keep the rh at a set point, usually 50%. It will release or trap moisture to maintain---comes in sheets and you can line cabinets with it etc. Or you could use paper materials and paper boxes over plastic--paper is better than plastic anyways for high temps & humidities...the thing to avoid, though, is high humidity. If you have color stuff and you have to run up the heat to keep the rh down, then your film will suffer. If the heat & humidity are too high, b&w rollfilm will suffer. The best bet is to shoot polyester based b&w sheet films....

    yes--go to the mines......cool, dry, dark....or shoot large format b&w only, and you may stand a chance, if you can keep the humidity down to 65% or lower.

    then again, nothing lasts forever. It's up to you to decide how long is long enough.

    p.s.--most of this is tongue in cheek--I have similar problems at home in my real-world, personal "archive" as well.

    Just do the best you can--
    KT

  2. #22
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    I'm a trifle confused about humidity being a factor when storing film at low temperatures.
    We are talking about unopened "inner foil packets" and unopened 35mm casettes, aren't we ? The film is packed at the proper humidity levels (as far as I know -- *very* dry) and should remain that way unless opened.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #23

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    It is my understanding that this discussion is about processed materials

  4. #24
    DKT
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    yes...the finished product, negs, chromes and prints. I veered off into cold storage--actually a topic where I'm just a student with a passing interest. The real experts in this field are folks like Henry Wilhelm, mark McCormack and photo conservators.

    KT

  5. #25
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Sorry - I must have jumped the track here somehow ...

    Why is this in "Ethics and Philosophy" ??? - anyway?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #26
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke
    All should see http://www.wilhelm-research.com/book_toc.html

    A comment: it sure seems like the material that gets the most archival attention is often among the least-interesting. I am reminded of the upper east floors of the Louvre, packed with so-so portraits of petty bureaucrats whose politcial connections got their faces into the museum.
    good question--but then what was the purpose of this original post?

    oh, I get it--sorry forgot--stepped out of my place again! Only fine-art photographers can theorize about archival issues...

    I'll let you get back to the "more interesting" aspects of "archival attention", whatever that may be.

  7. #27
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DKT
    good question--but then what was the purpose of this original post?

    oh, I get it--sorry forgot--stepped out of my place again! Only fine-art photographers can theorize about archival issues...
    Was that directed toward me?

    I was struck with guilt when I realized that I had apparently posted an answer that was "off-topic" - so I decided to check on what *I* had done ... and found what I perceived to be an entire thread that was ... well, slightly ...

    How does one imagine that the archival life of art is an "Ethical" or "Philosophical" subject?

    Anyone can have an opinion on *ANYTHING* as far as I'm concerned ... whether their direction is "Fine Art Photography" or not ... why would you think I am advocating anything different?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #28

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    I think we drifted....

    The issue was the ethics of defining what is archival.

    Here is a thought....

    What is the responsibility of the gallery? Should they merely state the true nature of the medium? Or is that a job for the artists only? Should they include care instructions with every sale?
    Official Photo.net Villain
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    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  9. #29
    DKT
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    Ed--my apologies as well. I joined in the middle of the thread in regards to inkjet accelerated testing and drifted off into temp/rh space from there.

    As I see it though--it's all inter-related. In the end, it all comes back to the environment, no matter how you define it. It doesn't matter if you're talking about platinum prints or inkjets. Given the proper storage for them--even if it means sitting in a subzero vault in the dark--they'll outlast other materials that may be in fact more "archival".

    An archive or a museum is pretty much stuck with the material after the fact, unless they commission a piece somehow or can specify the material in use. A gallery that's selling the prints--well, that's another story, and I'm not goig to venture there...

    BTW--Ed, no that wasn't directed at you directly....uhm...but more to the whole point of the first post. I was confused about the link to Wilhelm's book--which is a great resource. I couldn't figure out the point of the sarcasm.


    KT

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