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Thread: "Archival"

  1. #1
    bjorke's Avatar
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    All should see http://www.wilhelm-research.com/book_toc.html

    A comment: it sure seems like the material that gets the most archival attention is often among the least-interesting. I am reminded of the upper east floors of the Louvre, packed with so-so portraits of petty bureaucrats whose politcial connections got their faces into the museum.

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    Shesh's Avatar
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    Thanks.
    Cheers, Shesh

    Not to know what happened before one was born is always to be a child - Cicero

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    I read their accelerated test chapter and it only confirmed many of the suspicions I have. The have come up with very complete tests for dark and light fading, and some very interesting ideas. But they miss what I think is an abvious element present in everyday display which are atmospheric contaminants. Any gallery or houselhold will have some chemicals which are widely used and can in some measure permeate into the print and cause further chemical reactions.

    The formation of free radicals is a well known process in chemistry and is known as one of the major causes of chemical degradation. The most widely known example is the ozone layer. In a household or gallery many chemicals are used which under the right circumstances can produce free radicals. To name a few, ammonia for glass cleaning, floor wax, etc, etc. Making a light accelerated test under tightly controlled lab conditions with the absence of these pollutants is like cooking a dish and failing to put spices to give it flavor. A little bit goes a long way and significantly changes the final reults.

    Sure a print might last 100 or 200 years according to their interpolation when exposed to ligh under tightly controlled humidity and pollution controls, but once is out in the "real" world we find it fades in only a few years, I fail to understand why under the real life data these people fail to see why their tests are innaccurate.

    Given a little bit of data massage any result can be obtained.

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    Sean's Avatar
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    They probably do have real world results, but they are under lock and key. There is probably also fine print somewhere on all digital materials that say:

    Archival to 200+ years!*

    *this is in total darkness in a temperature controlled vacuum. Results may vary in real world applications.

  5. #5
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    Actually that's good news. Do you think we should be happy if something really ugly lasts a long time? 8)
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    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    They probably do have real world results, but they are under lock and key. There is probably also fine print somewhere on all digital materials that say:
    Archival to 200+ years!*
    *this is in total darkness in a temperature controlled vacuum. Results may vary in real world applications.
    I have seen similar, but it usually is more closely defined: "Archival Inks that will last for 500 years!!"

    Well, maybe .. but they do not mention the paper, or the life of the inks when apllied to, and therefore combined with, the paper.

    I could imagine - actual document life ~ 2 months... but, "It isn't the ink's fault - it was the paper..."

    They continue ..."GUARANTEED - Or Your Money Back..." but that applies only to the ink ... and who is going to collect after a 499 year failure?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #7

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    Only 500 years? Paula and I guarantee our prints for 1,000 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael A. Smith
    Only 500 years? Paula and I guarantee our prints for 1,000 years.
    You plan on being around to reprint them?...

  9. #9

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    Of course.

  10. #10
    DKT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I read their accelerated test chapter and it only confirmed many of the suspicions I have. The have come up with very complete tests for dark and light fading, and some very interesting ideas. But they miss what I think is an abvious element present in everyday display which are atmospheric contaminants. Any gallery or houselhold will have some chemicals which are widely used and can in some measure permeate into the print and cause further chemical reactions.

    .

    FYI--paper about variables in accelerated testing of inkjets:


    http://iaq.dk/papers/inkjet.htm

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