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  1. #11
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Who was it that said, "Thirty percent of the world's greatest photographs are nothing more than fortunate mistakes."?
    Not sure, but it's funny how many of those "mistakes" were made by pros, don't you think? (Wasn't it Thomas Jefferson who said "the harder I work, the luckier I get"?)

    (And do you include work that deliberately invokes chance, like that of Philip di Lorca-Corcia?)("Corky Lorky" among a few of my friends -- see this URL: to see a recent London Corky outing (with a couple of hangers-on from Denmark): http://www.botzilla.com/photo/corky2/ (and yes, those ones are d*****l, which is why I don't post them here))

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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  2. #12
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    [quote="bjorke"]
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Who was it that said, "Thirty percent of the world's greatest photographs are nothing more than fortunate mistakes."?
    Not sure, but it's funny how many of those "mistakes" were made by pros, don't you think?

    That was said by Ansel Adams.

    I don't know much Latin ... If "carpe diem" translates to "seize the day", possibly a good motto would be something like "carpe .. errata" - "Seize the errors" ...?

    I'm going to re-post a photograph of mine .. "Abstraction #26" to the Critique Gallery. I'd be interested in the comments.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  3. #13
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Personally, I learned 'proper' technique so that I could forget about technique completely. To me, the best thing technique can do is to get out of the way of the image. Poor technique can break an image, but good technique can rarely make an image.

    Slightly off topic, it's funny how many photographers are / were musicians. You can count me among them -- I began playing the piano 27 years ago at age three. I am absolutely incapable of creating a successful print in the darkroom without music (of some sort) playing. It draws me into the creative process.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheryl Jacobs
    I am absolutely incapable of creating a successful print in the darkroom without music (of some sort) playing.
    I am absolutely incapable of creating a successful print in the darkroom with music (of any sort) playing.

    Remarkable how we all use various different tools to get to the same place.

  5. #15

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    Great pictures can be taken by amateurs devoid of talent & by great photographers. We can thank Kodak, Polaroid & digital cameras for that leveling achievement. I'm reminded of Auggie in movie Smoke who takes a picture of same view same time every day. Occasionally, he'll be lucky in capturing an interesting moment - kind'a like monkeys with typewriters creating a sonnet. Same technique used by fashion photographers - use up enough film with an attractive model and you might get one or two good pictures. Now, we can use a digicam, separate the images, & find a valuable image. Is this photography or more the recognition of value within a pile of rubbish. I don't think that finding the occasional gem among many mistakes can be used to prove that we should avoid or downplay the learning of technique.

  6. #16
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
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    The quote that 30% of your photographs will be lucky accidents is by Brooks Jensen. Originally in LensWork, volume 1 #4 (December 1993). it is reprinted in the current volume, #50.
    A New Project! Transformations 02/02/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  7. #17
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    One other example of "Carpe Errata" (will someone fluent in Latin correct this - "Seize the Error"?) - from a rumored darkroom incident. The "Sabby" referred to here is Sabbatier:

    Man Ray: "Dammit, Sabby, the red light!! Don't just walk into the darkroom with the red light on ...!!!
    Aiiee!!! ... and I'm developing a print ... well, let's see what happened before I toss this one ..."
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #18
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Lipka
    The quote that 30% of your photographs will be lucky accidents is by Brooks Jensen. Originally in LensWork, volume 1 #4 (December 1993). it is reprinted in the current volume, #50.
    I tried to respond once before -- but something happened??

    I won't argue the point. Ansel Adams said this (quoted?) in his Video Tape tape at our local library. I'm not sure of the title - I'll visit the Library and look it up when I get a chance.

    Interesting tape. It shows St. Ansel drying prints in a microwave oven to "sidestep" the "dry-down" effect.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #19
    lee
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    It shows St. Ansel drying prints in a microwave oven to "sidestep" the "dry-down" effect.

    Is he trying to sidestep or test the "dry-down" effect?

    I seem to recall that he was testing the time for the dry-down so it would not ruin the prints he was doing.

    Am I remembering this correctly?

    le\c

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by lee
    It shows St. Ansel drying prints in a microwave oven to "sidestep" the "dry-down" effect.

    Is he trying to sidestep or test the "dry-down" effect?

    I seem to recall that he was testing the time for the dry-down so it would not ruin the prints he was doing.

    Am I remembering this correctly?

    le\c
    Lee,

    My memory coincides with yours. I have always heard that to be a quick way to dry a print to determine dry down percentage. I believe that dry down is a factor no matter how the print is dryed.

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