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  1. #71

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    Yes, all great works of art go beyond just recording a scene on film or throwing paint on a canvas. Michael refers to care and love to make the connection to people. I think of it as having a profound sense of respect for the subject and the audience. Sometimes when I see something that I believe provides a truly wonderful opportunity to make a photograph, I feel a strong sense of gratitude towards the object or scene. It may sound a little crazy but it is like a little voice comes from the subject and says "Someone has finally found me, someone who cares." When I get a feeling like that from a subject, it forces me to approach it with a certain reverence.

    The results may not always be what i expected, but it seems to make the whole experience of photographing more rewarding.

  2. #72
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    dnmilikan wrote

    I have heard the term "uninteresting" used in judgement of what to me are beautiful photographs that you and Paula record. By comparison I had a friend over to my house yesterday and showed them your images in the latest Black and White magazine. This is a person with no photographic training whatsoever. Yet they were absolutely fascinated with your images. It is difficult to understand...you would think the person with the most time in photographing would have the better vision. Such was not the case in this instance.

    Donald, could this be because photographers consciously view hundreds of photographs and analayze them to some degree and are far quicker to discard ones that are redundant, uninteresting or poorly executed. Could it be that we just get jaded.

    Where as your friend, when the work was pointed out to him, for the first time took a good look. He hasn't "seen" (consciously) many photographs therefore it could look fresh to him.

    The average person really doesn't seem to spend much time or care about most photographs, especially scenics/pictorial because they rarely jump out at him. He, on the other hand may be more inclined to look at pictures with people in them, probably just because people have an attraction to looking at other people.


    Just asking,


    Michael McBlane

  3. #73

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    Perhaps it is this "loss of innocence" which results in those personal attacks I mentioned at the start of this thread. Our tastes and our biases are like bespoke suits - they are made to fit us. If we can reason them in a concise and friendly manner can they be judged as good or bad. Stress on friendly!
    Francesco

  4. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    dnmilikan wrote

    I have heard the term "uninteresting" used in judgement of what to me are beautiful photographs that you and Paula record. By comparison I had a friend over to my house yesterday and showed them your images in the latest Black and White magazine. This is a person with no photographic training whatsoever. Yet they were absolutely fascinated with your images. It is difficult to understand...you would think the person with the most time in photographing would have the better vision. Such was not the case in this instance.

    Donald, could this be because photographers consciously view hundreds of photographs and analayze them to some degree and are far quicker to discard ones that are redundant, uninteresting or poorly executed. Could it be that we just get jaded.

    Where as your friend, when the work was pointed out to him, for the first time took a good look. He hasn't "seen" (consciously) many photographs therefore it could look fresh to him.

    The average person really doesn't seem to spend much time or care about most photographs, especially scenics/pictorial because they rarely jump out at him. He, on the other hand may be more inclined to look at pictures with people in them, probably just because people have an attraction to looking at other people.


    Just asking,


    Michael McBlane
    Michael,

    You pose a good question and I am not sure that there is a single answer to this. I think that what may occur sometimes is that because we examine a lot of images that we tend to put things into catagories; boxes if you will. And if an image doesn't readily fit into one of these catagories we discard them out of hand. Thus the image does not get past our inner critic.

    I think that often times we would benefit from that which I have heard you address often and that is "Zen Mind--Beginners Mind". I think that is what occurred in the case of my friend the other afternoon. She had no preconceived notion of how something should appear and she was absolutely enthralled in examining the images of Michael and Paula with an open mind. She took time to examine each one...to notice details. Thus she experienced something that the other person I mentioned failed to do.

    Certainly there are personal preferences that may become involved from time to time. But when these personal preference become encompassing then I think that one would benefit from an examination of what they are and why they exist.

  5. #75
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    I don't get it...
    hi!

  6. #76

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    After being part of this forum for 6 months now I realised that the title of this thread I started should read "Tastes and Biases = EGOS!". One clear example, when someone asks for advice there is a greater than 50 per cent chance that someone will feel that his advice is the best and will point it out, perhaps even start an argument with a dissenting view. This is a human trait I think - hubris. We have a hard time realising that to have choices is what makes this game fun.

    But what I really want to say is that after all is said and done there are a few that share their knowledge without fail time and time again despite attacks and criticisms about their motives. To them I say "Grazie Mille!"
    Francesco

  7. #77

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    I think that at times it's easy to believe that someone who likes what we like is imbued with some special insight or sophistication lacking in others who just "don't get it". I have a hard time understanding how someone could prefer vanilla ice cream to chocolate, but I respect their preference and don't offer them chocolate ice cream.
    I believe that jdef has properly clarified my view with the above quote. No disrespect intended to anybody that participates on this or any other form, but we are all biased in one way or another.

    My simple point is that for my photographs ....these need to satisfy my desires and asthetic <sp> objectives to be successful in my eyes. If others like what I do I am pleased but do not require that be so. I thought this thread was started to discuss an appropriate way to offer a viewpoint on somebody elses work and not a discussion on who "qualifies" as a professional critic.

    Perhaps some folks should step back and consider other aspects of their life. How do you feel when somebody tries to tell you which way to "vote". Or perhaps somebody has gone to great lengths to tell you which vehicle to buy that would be best for you. Is this "THAT" much different that trying to claim that your eyesight, photographic skills and evaluation is so much above anybody else that can see?

    For myself, my selection and tastes in cars, women, and photography (to name a few) please me in the way I want. I do not need or require anybody to re-educate me into believing that their assessment is superior to mine. My brain works just fine in this fashion. I am quite able to learn and re-evaluate things and evolve in an ongoing basis as I proceed throughout this life.

    As the original post suggests "Why is it so important that you tell me how to view the photographic world according to you?"

    I ask "Why can you not just walk a mile in my shoes and accept that I am both capable and happy in making my own evaluations without your insistent views to the contrary?"

    "Why can you not accept that others are not ignorant, unskilled or without the ability to view and evaluate just because they do not aggressively speak out at every opportunity?"

    Kind Regards,
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

  8. #78

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    Ed

    Just for the record on introvert and extroverts

    Think of people like batteries. An introvert, in a social interactions releases their energy in order to stay social. Their batteries are recharged while they are alone or in a situation where they do not have to interact. They stay charged in these situations. Thus they give up energy to the group.

    An extrovert is charged in social siuations and drained out of them. It is hard for them to be isolated or do something unless there is someone there to do it with.

    There are of course varying degrees of each. I am about as introverted as a person can get. I avoid socail situations because even the thought of one begins the draining process.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  9. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    Ed

    Just for the record on introvert and extroverts

    Think of people like batteries. An introvert, in a social interactions releases their energy in order to stay social. Their batteries are recharged while they are alone or in a situation where they do not have to interact. They stay charged in these situations. Thus they give up energy to the group.

    An extrovert is charged in social siuations and drained out of them. It is hard for them to be isolated or do something unless there is someone there to do it with.

    There are of course varying degrees of each. I am about as introverted as a person can get. I avoid socail situations because even the thought of one begins the draining process.
    Mark that is the same manner in which it was explained to me by a professional in the field. The battery illustration is very good.

  10. #80
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    Reading these two posts has drained me - a dead short across my electrodes.
    juan

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