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  1. #21

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    I agree with Joe, I think we all go through this stage where our prints are technically very good but "boring." Or at least that is how I felt about my previous efforts.

    To a greater degree I beleive this comes from trying to emulate previous phtographers. Lets face it, somewhere we all have a photographer that we admire and wish to make photographs like they did. In my case I was always chasing the kind of images Paul Caponigro made.

    You have reach the stage where photography becomes truly enjoyable. It is time to develop your "style", what makes your vision unique? when you stop and take a photograph, examine the reasons why you want to take this particular picture, and evolve from that. IMO if all you do is take a picture because it lools like "xxxx" then you will always be dissatisfied with your efforts. Do your own thing, break all the rules and in time your work will be as unique as those that attract you.

  2. #22
    CPorter's Avatar
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    WOW! Pretty deep stuff! I have to go with the right brain left brain theory.

  3. #23

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    Learning technique isn't a prerequisite to taking soulful pictures, rather technical proficiency cuts down on the number of those images ruined by poor technique. I frequently return to a particular subject matter that resonates with me hoping to achieve photographically what I perceive. At a recent workshop with Clyde Butcher, he said he first visualizes an image, then sets up his camera to capture it - doesn't compose on the groundglass. Some would view that as careless technique, while many others appreciate the result.

    If you've achieved a plateau of technical proficeincy without having created any soulful images along the way, you need to take a different route.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    Ole,

    I vote for stupidity. After all how can something so elusive be so easily stated?
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomassauerwein
    I'm beginning to believe that "The Soul" is in the failures,
    Interesting. A lot of my current photographic style has more to do with "failures" and happy accidents than intended successes.

    Then again, I believe we each have an inner vision that given opportunity will assert itself. I'm often asked how I thought to make something look a certain way (my whacko movements and stuff like that) and honestly.. That's just what seemed right at the time. I rarely spend a lot of time deliberating over how to shoot something.

    So, shoot from the heart... and shoot loose enough that some of your instincts can come through.

  6. #26
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    A few years ago my wife and I designed and built our own home. When it was completed, it was a thing of beauty. All who saw the house remarked about the beauty of the finished product. Only my wife and I knew about the mistakes that were contained in the house. We no longer own that house; but we judge all houses by the standards to which that house was built. The only way we will ever be satisfied by another house is if we build another ourselves.
    I have yet to achive this level of achivement with my photography. So I continue to learn and try new techniques.

  7. #27

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    and I like what Cheryl had to say.

    I can't nail it down to one frame that changed my photography but it I know what roll it was when it all clicked for my 35mm work. and I know the day when my Large Format photos changed forever.

    Both were rooted not in technical details but in personal motivation and in connecting with why I was taking the photo.

  8. #28
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    Does it not all stem from a passionate response to what you see? The follow through to be able to work that passion further? The challenge? The time? The care? The frustration? The work!
    Non Digital Diva

  9. #29

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    I was shooting a project monday and tuesday, The second day my assistant came to me after the shot was about 80% set we were waiting on the models to get ready. She started wanting to work the details, I asked her to wait till the shot was underway. A little frustrated with me she asked "why do you always do that?" "it would be so much more efficient if..." At the time my response to her was, " just have the equipment set up and available, when we get into it I'll have a better understanding as to exactly where I want it, and at what value it needs to be". Though both of us knew pretty much what was going to happen and where everything belonged it just seems, to confining to make permanent decisions when the moment has yet to arrive. Her argument was, " it would be less stressful if everything was absolute" This thread got me to remember this discussion, She was right of course, but something in the last minute activity of an image creates for me an alertness to see things I might miss if everything was already cast in stone and we are trying to make things fit to a pre-conceived moment. Being flexible allows for us, the freedom to happen onto opportunity. This my be where the soul lies, I don't know.

  10. #30
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    You know, trying to define or categorize "soul" or "art" in photography is quite elusive at best. It reminds me of a high school professor back in ’50. We had a physics class with some football athletes upon which he looked with some disdain because of their seemingly casual approach to science specifically and learning in general (his thoughts – not mine). Upon observing that one student was falling asleep in mid lecture, he interrupted the athlete’s reverie with a question.

    Prof.: “Ok, what is electricity - Mr. Milo?”
    Milo (prompted by pokes and jabs of his teammates): “Uhh…I don’ kno’.”
    Prof.:: “Did you read your assignment, Mr. Milo?”
    Milo: “Yezzir, I knew then, but I forget.”
    Prof.: “WHAT? The only man in history who knew the what electricity is and he forgets???!”
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

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