Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,524,022   Online: 906
      
Page 20 of 20 FirstFirst ... 1014151617181920
Results 191 to 200 of 200
  1. #191
    Mike Té's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    863
    Images
    95
    David wins.
    Michael Robert Taylor
    Ottawa

    I wish I'D said that.... Bartlett

    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...imageuser=7358

  2. #192
    David William White's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hamilton, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,182
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    Arg! Those who venture forth and return with printable negatives win -- every day. You just never know how precious or valuable a photograph might become.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  3. #193
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,103
    Images
    60
    I gave up on this about 50 days in. I found that too often, my focus became one of taking daily photographs to fill the quota, rather than concentrating on getting photographs I wanted or expanding my photographic experiences.

    The back end administration was a real drag as well.

    I think that this might work better for me if I was already shooting regularly, and either developing and printing very regularly (3+ times a week?), or using a lab to develop and scan most of my negatives. The fact that my darkroom space is temporary, and that my scanning resources are slow, made a daily quota a real challenge.

    I also didn't like the fact that the practicalities of developing and printing daily work tended to push me toward 35mm black and white, whereas I often would have preferred to shoot Kodachrome (another project I am trying to complete) or medium format black & white.

    I may try this again with a different quota - something like three shots per week.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #194
    KWhitmore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Montreal
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    511
    Images
    13
    I haven't been here for a while so here's my thoughts.

    This has been a great challenge for me. I've missed a few days certainly but I've made my peace with that. :-)

    I've shot more film than I could have imagined in such a short space of time and had many interesting conversations with friends and family about the whys and hows of doing such a thing. I think I'll never get caught up in the darkroom even after using color film or digital to get me through the really tough days. I've enjoyed the mental stretch and will continue as best I can.

    Good luck to you guys!

  5. #195
    Rob Skeoch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Burlington, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    984
    It's the half way point of the Photo a Day Challenge. A group of us started Jan. 1 taking a photo every day. I think only David White has taken one each day, I know I haven't.

    The project would be much easier using a digital camera but most of the photographers who came along on the ride were shooting film. After six months of shooting you go through a fair bit of film and chemistry. You also learn a few things.

    1 - get the system better organized so you can streamline the processing, contacting and proofing stage. The darkroom seems to be the bottleneck of the exercise.

    2 - try and get into the darkroom every couple weeks to make high quality prints of the better images

    3 - try and work a theme for a few weeks so you can really get the technique down

    4 - enjoy getting out a taking photos

    5 - use different formats, it keeps things fresh

    6 - travel if you can
    Rob Skeoch
    This is my blog http://thepicturedesk.blogspot.com/
    This my website for photo supplies...
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com
    This is my website for Rangfinder gear
    www.rangefinderstore.com

  6. #196

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Washington, the state
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,089
    Images
    16
    This thread seems to have tapered off a little lately. I was just curious to know if any of the "participants" of this exercise had any thoughts. I guess that I will go first.

    1. I am probably somewhere in the 50% range (I made a photo or slide on about half of the days). I think that I only missed a couple of days in the first three months and after that I steadily missed more and more days. Things picked up more after summer was over.

    2. My organizational skills are really lousy.

    3. Somewhere about four or five months in, I hit a creative wall and could not think of fresh ideas.

    4. On a positive note, I used up a lot more film than I have in over ten years, and I am now taking a camera with me a lot of the time.

    Oh well, there is always next year.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  7. #197
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Monroe, WA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,094
    Images
    48
    Here's what I learned,

    (1) To make a single photo on each day for 365 days I will probably need to be retired. At least to make a meaningful photo. However, to make a photo for each day might be more realistic.

    (2) The logistics are indeed a killer. And the first thing to get killed was making darkroom prints for scan reproduction. Negative scanning was the only way to keep up. And negative scanning sucks.

    (3) The project consumed just about all available photographic resources. Kind of like NASA spending the last thirty years concentrating on only sending shuttles to the space station, instead of going on to Mars.

    (4) I made it through into April before succumbing. But I only managed to develop and scan through the middle of March. And I only posted throught the third week of February. (See #2 above.)

    (5) I need to live where it rains less than 10+ months out of each year. Yes, inclement weather can be good. And you'd be amazed how much subject material can be found right outside the car window. But still...

    (6) I'm seriously thinking about trying again starting this upcoming January 1st. (See #1 above.) Go figure.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #198

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    8
    this sounds both challenging and fun. Assuming I have my equipment together I'll try this out for 2011. I may wait until my second semester starts though, I only will have two classes to worry about.

    Thanks for the challenge,

    Daniel

  9. #199

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Southern Ontario-ish
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    517
    If I had the funds, this could be an interesting project with my Alpenhause Polaroid. Just scan the prints and post. No need to shoot partial or short rolls and process.

  10. #200
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,598
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Here's what I learned,

    (1) To make a single photo on each day for 365 days I will probably need to be retired. At least to make a meaningful photo. However, to make a photo for each day might be more realistic.
    I agree.

    I started but found real quick that my job's patterns pushed me to consider the same subjects over and over without being able to vary the time of day.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    (2) The logistics are indeed a killer. And the first thing to get killed was making darkroom prints for scan reproduction. Negative scanning was the only way to keep up. And negative scanning sucks.
    This goes back to #1 for me, gotta have the time regardless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    (3) The project consumed just about all available photographic resources. Kind of like NASA spending the last thirty years concentrating on only sending shuttles to the space station, instead of going on to Mars.
    For me it was just doing a shot a day without a real destination, that got old quick.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    (4) I made it through into April before succumbing. But I only managed to develop and scan through the middle of March. And I only posted throught the third week of February. (See #2 above.)
    Mid-Feb

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    (5) I need to live where it rains less than 10+ months out of each year. Yes, inclement weather can be good. And you'd be amazed how much subject material can be found right outside the car window. But still...
    I don't know if that is a fix. I live where there are 300 days of sun.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    (6) I'm seriously thinking about trying again starting this upcoming January 1st. (See #1 above.) Go figure.

    Ken
    I'm not, unless I find a subject that would warrant that. I think that's my limit.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin